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Commute Orlando Animations and Videos

John Brooking
JohnB38
Westbrook, ME
Post #: 1,457
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Keri Caffrey at CommuteOrlando.com is beginning a series of animations about car/bike collisions types and how to avoid them. Here's the first one. Future posts in the series will be linked to here.



Because Meetup doesn't allow embedded Flash, you'll have click the picture or the following link to see the animation work and read the accompanying blog post. She's got animations and explanatory text for each of the four scenarios listed: Narrow Lane, Wide Lane, Bike Lane, and Passing a Queue.

Yea, Keri! love struck
John Brooking
JohnB38
Westbrook, ME
Post #: 1,657
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Here's Keri and Mighk's latest video, on the real advantages of lane control on a road consisting of multiple narrow lanes.



Full blog post and comments
Troy Moon
user 7180168
Portland, ME
Post #: 7
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Thanks for posting these, John.

I've been taking the lane much more recently. Even though I know it makes me more visible it sometimes "feels wrong" as, in my experience, cyclists have long been taught to stay right. I still worry about a distracted driver rear ending me, though.
John Brooking
JohnB38
Westbrook, ME
Post #: 1,658
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I'm not aware of any studies to back this up, but there is a theory is out there among those who practice lane control that you may be more likely to be seen by a distracted driver when you are in the middle of the lane than off to the side, because even distracted drivers regularly look straight ahead of them, while the peripheral vision is more compromised. And, as this video shows, they sometimes have a longer time period in which to notice you when you are in the middle of the lane.

Of course, if they don't see you in either case, common sense would imply that they are more likely to hit you in the middle of the lane than off to the side, so I guess in practice it's a matter of how much better the increased visibility is. But also keep in mind that bicyclists have been struck and killed while riding in shoulders, probably because they were not noticed, so staying off to the side is no guarantee either.

Being taught to stay too far to the right in too many situations is one reason some people oppose bike lanes on principle, because bike lanes reinforce exactly that teaching. Even worse when they are painted all the way to an intersection, where staying to the right is often inappropriate. (Unless you are turning right or there is no right turn allowed, and even then taking the lane can have advantages too.) Staying to the right is considerate and appropriate in shareable lanes between intersections, and is Maine law in those situations, but most of society (clearly including some police officers) has simplified that law to mean just "stay out of the way of cars". It's hard even for experienced cyclists to overcome this taboo against trying to mix with faster traffic.
mike
user 3053132
Portland, ME
Post #: 552
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I still worry about a distracted driver rear ending me, though.

I was rear-ended by a distracted driver (who totally admitted fault) yet I still take the lane in the exact same stretch of road when I ride to work because I still feel it is the safest thing to do in that area/situation.

In that case I was hit solidly from behind and shot forward. Luckily I did not fall and there was no car in front of me. If I had been off to the side maybe I would have been pushed sideways or propelled into a curb or another lane and it could have been worse. Or maybe I would have been missed entirely. There's no way to say really. I just go with what experience and statistics tell me!
John Brooking
JohnB38
Westbrook, ME
Post #: 1,663
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Cycling a Massive, High-speed Interchange
An example from Orlando



There is also lots of explanatory text on an accompanying Commute Orlando post.

We need video like this for our I-295 interchanges!

I know that members Jim Tasse and Erik West have been doing some filming, not sure exactly where. Maybe Dylan and I can work on the South Portland Exit 2/3 interchange down Westbrook Street from the Mall to Broadway, that stretch past Ricetta's and the Irving station. That involves some similar lane control and lane changing as this video, though not on that scale. You have to bias left in the right lane approaching the I-295 entrance slip lane that opens up, then change lanes left again right after the first red light to avoid the right turn only lane that it turns into (unless you're actually turning right).
John Brooking
JohnB38
Westbrook, ME
Post #: 1,674
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This one's not by Keri, but features Keri and some of her students. Normal people, all, and only one bike lane in the entire 12 minutes. The roads are for all people.


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