The Portland Hiking Meetup Group Message Board Gear Talk › Freeze-dried food recommendations

Freeze-dried food recommendations

duane
user 6564426
Portland, OR
Post #: 188
In my limited experience with freeze-dried food, I recall them being a mixed success. Some are quite good and others are not so much. Unfortunately, I haven't taken notes over the years. I will soon need to eat lots of this stuff on a backpacking trip to the Sierras. I'm looking for recommendations on preferred brands and/or flavors, or ones to stay away from. Thanks.
Claudio
user 4250936
Beaverton, OR
Post #: 85
Duane,

The source I use is www.trailfoods.com They are very tasty, easy to prepare, single serving and not a lot of salt. I compliment that with stuff I get from www.minimuz.biz. You can also try www.packitgourmet.com that also has some good stuff.
duane
user 6564426
Portland, OR
Post #: 189
Low salt, maybe, but definitely not low sodium. A spot check of the Enertia meals shows most have more than 40% of the DV. The Three Cheese Mac has a whopping 79%. But I'm fine with that...
Tyler
user 6494937
Portland, OR
Post #: 4
First off, I tend to like high quantities of salt on a multi-night outing. As far as I'm concerned, I'm sweating out a lot more that my daily value of salt, therefore I need to replace it, and then some. But to each his/her own on that topic.

As for preferred backpacking food, I swear by MaryJane's Organic backpacking meals. They come in echo friendly pouches, the fully burn away in a camp fire, and taste pretty darn good. http://www.maryjaneso...­ I usually get the bulk 3 lbs packages and make my own servings with reusable zip lock bags, "cooking" them directly in a pot, but they do sell individual servings as well. I usually cook up some quinoa, and add a basic freeze dried meal to this. It bumps up the volume considerably, and gives you some great protein content as well (veggie here).

I highlight this company because they are all organic and give a decent selection for this genre of backpacking food. FYI, their oatmeal is amazing!
Warren
user 9676491
Portland, OR
Post #: 8
No freeze dried food, most backpacking intended freeze dried stuff tends to be bulkly, but some options:

New Seasons lentil soup mix available in bulk is a pretty good staple sometimes I throw in a handful of couscous. Light, low bulk and doesn't need much water to rehydrate. Top with some cheddar cheese, spice to your liking. I can do five days with just a zip loc of the stuff and some couscous.

Tomato sauce and salsa both dehydrate well at home using a dehydrator and can be done in an oven with some experimentation. I tend to use my own sauce but for longer trips I'll use store bought for an even longer in pack shelf life.

Bulk refried beans powder can be used for simple tacos in the woods.

Pesto sauce keeps well, prosciutto does as well, combine with angel hair spaghetti for a low fuel, low weight meal.

Chicken, tuna and salmon in a packet can be used to augment any of the above.

The Indian food in a foil packet thats really easy to get these days is heavy as it as it has all it's water but if you'll be camping away from water or if you'll need to use water sparingly they can be a nice spicy change of pace.
A former member
Post #: 157
Mountain House is my preferred brand for extended camping trips. I love the higher protein/fat products they offer and the ease of just boiling water. I tend to use the two serving packets for days with 12-14 miles of hiking. 

A few of my favorites:
 - Beef or Chicken Stew w/optional bagel or tortilla for getting ALL the stew sauce
 - Lasagna w/meat sauce w/bagel or tortilla
 - Mexican Chicken and Rice
 - Beef Stroganoff

For breakfast, I eat their instant eggs w/ham and bell peppers. I tend to eat a fair quantity of nuts, dried fruits, and beef jerky during the day with lots of water while I hike too.  
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