addressalign-toparrow-leftarrow-rightbackbellblockcalendarcameraccwcheckchevron-downchevron-leftchevron-rightchevron-small-downchevron-small-leftchevron-small-rightchevron-small-upchevron-upcircle-with-checkcircle-with-crosscircle-with-pluscrossdots-three-verticaleditemptyheartexporteye-with-lineeyefacebookfolderfullheartglobegmailgooglegroupshelp-with-circleimageimagesinstagramFill 1linklocation-pinm-swarmSearchmailmessagesminusmoremuplabelShape 3 + Rectangle 1ShapeoutlookpersonJoin Group on CardStartprice-ribbonShapeShapeShapeShapeImported LayersImported LayersImported Layersshieldstartickettrashtriangle-downtriangle-uptwitteruserwarningyahoo

Alley Pond Park

The next in our park series is the second largest park in Queens and the 9th largest in the city. We may walk along one of the many hiking trails and/or have a little picnic, visit one of the nature centers or just enjoy a nice day in the park. There is no set agenda for this event. We will try to cover as much ground as we can to fully explore the park.

We will meet at the Alley Pond Adventure Center. 

By Public Transportation
Take the E or F train to Union Turnpike station. Transfer to the Eastbound Q46 bus and get off at the Winchester Boulevard stop. Walk north on Winchester Boulevard towards the Grand Central Parkway overpass. The entrance is on your left underneath the Grand Central Parkway. Walk across the parking lot and soccer field to the Alley Pond Adventure Center. Contact info will be emailed.

http://www.nycgovparks.org/programs/rangers/adventure-course/directions

You may want to wear hiking shoes or rugged sneakers. We will be doing a lot of walking. You may also want to bring a light lunch/snack. Only severe weather will cancel the event.

From nycparks.org:

Alley Pond Park offers glimpses into New York’s geologic past, its colonial history, and its current conservation efforts. Because of its glacier-formed moraine, the park has numerous and unique natural features, like its freshwater and saltwater wetlands, tidal flats, meadows, and forests, which create a diverse ecosystem and support abundant bird life.


The park is also home to New York City's first public high ropes adventure course (the largest in the Northeast), part of the Urban Park Rangers' larger Alley Pond Park Adventure program. A low–cost outdoor education and adventure program, Alley Pond Park Adventure teaches participants how to canoe, use a compass, fish, and enjoy a natural setting without leaving NYC.

This park is the second largest in Queens. The site is named for The Alley, an 18th century commercial and manufacturing center formerly located here. The origin of that center’s name is the subject of some debate. One theory is that “alley” refers to the shape of the glacier-made valley. Another holds that colonial travelers, who passed through the valley to Brooklyn, en route to the Manhattan ferries, named it “the alley.” The well-traveled passage is believed to have been the route George Washington [masked]) took while touring Long Island in 1790.

The park lies on a glacier-formed moraine, a ridge of sand and rock that formed 15,000 years ago, marking the southern terminus of the Minnesota Ice Sheet. The glacier dropped the boulders that sit on the hillsides of the southern end of the park and left buried chunks of ice that melted and formed the ponds dispersed throughout the valley. Geologists call these “Kettle Ponds.” Fresh water drains into the valley from the hills and bubbles up from natural springs, mixing with the salt water from Little Neck Bay. As a result, the park is host to freshwater and saltwater wetlands, tidal flats, meadows, and forests, creating a diverse ecosystem and supporting abundant bird life.

The native Mattinecock once inhabited the area around Alley Pond Park, attracted by the shellfish in Little Neck Bay. In 1673, King Charles I of England gave a 600-acre land grant to Thomas Foster, who built a stone cottage close to modern-day Northern Boulevard. Two other Englishmen, Thomas Hicks and James Hedges, built mills that harnessed water flowing into Alley Creek. Although the area supported light industry, it stayed essentially rural throughout the 19th century and attracted residents with its natural beauty. William Vanderbilt’s (1849–1920) privately run Long Island Motor Parkway was built through the area in 1908, a harbinger of the age of automobile travel that would continue to shape the park through the 20th century.

As the borough of Queens expanded rapidly, its population doubling in the 1920s, the City moved to protect open spaces. The City of New York acquired this site for park purposes on June 24, 1929, pursuant to resolution adopted by the Board of Estimate (a now defunct municipal body) on July 28, 1927. Parks acquired 330 acres of land surrounding the alley later that year, the most significant acquisition in the creation of the park, and cleared several older structures from the property. “This is an attractive offer and parks must be anticipated for the good of the increasing populations,” Mayor James J. Walker (1881–1946) said after the Board of Estimate approved the $1.3 million acquisition. “There is no better site in Queens.” At the same time, the City obtained an option on 500 acres for a parkway connecting other parks in Queens, one of the first steps in a move to connect the City’s parks via “greenways.”

The park, including 26 acres of newly constructed playing fields and the Alley Pond Park Nature Trail, the first such trail in the city’s park system, officially opened in 1935 at a ceremony attended by Mayor Fiorello H. LaGuardia (1882–1947) and Parks Commissioner Robert Moses (1888–1981). The new park offered users a 23-acre bird sanctuary, bridle paths, tennis courts, picnic areas, and a 200-space parking lot. Title to the Vanderbilt roadway was transferred to Parks in 1937 and the next year it was converted into a 2.5-mile bicycle path.

In its zeal to convert the area for recreational uses and through the construction of the Long Island Expressway and Cross Island Parkway in the 1930s, Parks filled in much of the marshland. This land now is now recognized as a vital link in nature’s ecosystem. In 1974, Parks created the Wetlands Reclamation Project and began rehabilitating the natural wetlands of the park. The Alley Pond Environmental Center opened in 1976 to provide the public with an understanding of the park’s history and ecology.

Alley Pond Park offers glimpses into New York’s geologic past, its colonial history, and its current conservation efforts. Over $10.9 million was spent from 1985 to 1999 to acquire more land for the park, ensuring that historic Alley Pond remains a place of respite and recreation for many years to come. In 1993, almost $1 million was spent to restore the Picnic Grove, renovate two stone buildings, and reconstruct the playground and soccer field, guaranteeing that future generations will continue to be able to enjoy the park.

Hiking Trails:

Numerous trails wind through native hardwood (oak-hickory) forest and kettle ponds. The north end of the park boasts splendid salt marsh views.

All trails are less than a mile, so we could easily do a few. Most are found "behind ballfield 6 by Winchester Boulevard, north of Union Turnpike."

For those who may want to get there early:

Fitness Bootcamp

Saturday, June 14, 2014

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

This event repeats every week on Saturday between 2/1/2014 and 6/28/2014.

Come join in! Bootcamp is a total body workout that  helps muscle tone, improve strength and endurance, and addresses muscle strength and endurance while keeping the heart rate up to burn calories and improve cardiovascular health. Location Alley Athletic in 

Alley Pond Park

 Queens  

Directions to this location

Cost: Free  
Event Organizer

Northeast Queens Parks

Contact Number

(718)[masked] x301

Contact Email

[masked]


Join or login to comment.

  • Marcos N.

    Hope all had a good time, I did my best to show you the cool parts of the park and I know it can be a bit difficult to keep up with me , but y'all seem to have done just fine in my book. Hope y'all enjoyed the hike and hope no one has any sore legs.

    1 · June 29, 2014

  • Eddie C

    Thanks to everyone who came out. I owe a debt of gratitude to Gary and Marcos. Gary for helping host the event and Marcos for being our trail leader. Beautiful day for a hike!

    1 · June 29, 2014

  • Kent

    I missed it too. Ended up walking around for 2 hours in hopes of running into the group, but no luck.

    June 28, 2014

    • Eddie C

      Sorry to hear, Kent. The meeting details were in the description, though. See you next time!

      June 29, 2014

  • A former member
    A former member

    Very challenging and enjoyable hike.

    1 · June 28, 2014

  • Raymond

    Hey guys, I missed that email completely and started at Union Tpke and Winchester Blvd. then hiked around for an hour. It was a nice big park for wonderful sightseeing. Thanks for the invite and sharing. I'd probably go back some day. Hope you guys have/had fun.

    June 28, 2014

  • Lake

    Have you guys left?

    June 28, 2014

  • Gary

    We are under the overpass at Grand Central

    June 28, 2014

  • Marcos N.

    Please read meetup description and the e-mail that was sent out carefully as to our meeting point because Eddie is without a phone at the moment

    1 · June 28, 2014

  • Elizabeth

    Unfortunately I cant make it due to work I have to do. Will try to stop by later at rapture

    June 28, 2014

  • Elizabeth

    Hi everyone coming by bus here are the directions from the nyc parks department. Hope this helps

    By Public Transportation
    Take the E or F train to Union Turnpike station. Transfer to the Eastbound Q46 bus and get off at the Winchester Boulevard stop. Walk north on Winchester Boulevard towards the Grand Central Parkway overpass. The entrance is on your left underneath the Grand Central Parkway. Walk across the parking lot and soccer field to the Alley Pond Adventure Center.

    June 25, 2014

  • Elizabeth

    Or an address to hopstop it

    June 6, 2014

    • Eddie C

      Other than bus and car, there are no nearby trains.

      June 25, 2014

    • mission: b.

      I see. Thanks!

      June 26, 2014

  • Eddie C

    Please note the date change from June 14 to June 28. Sorry for any inconvenience.

    June 7, 2014

  • Elizabeth

    Eddie do you know directions from astoria?

    June 6, 2014

  • Marcos N.

    Whoa is this really happening?

    June 5, 2014

    • Eddie C

      I told u I was gonna do it. Lol. Now join up.

      June 5, 2014

9 went

Sign up

Meetup members, Log in

By clicking "Sign up" or "Sign up using Facebook", you confirm that you accept our Terms of Service & Privacy Policy