April 15, 2011 - 23 went

Hike Mission Peak and Catch Sunset

In this photo:

There are no tags for this photo

Added by A former member
on Apr 20, 2011.
 

Comments

  • May

    very cool bob! is this with a long exposure?

    or cancel

  • Steven C.

    I think I know where he got the idea (http://blog.starcircleacademy.com/2011/03/driven-to-abstraction/)! I like it Bob! Trivia question: Bob took this shot by moving his camera while the lens was open... why do the lights look "dotted" instead of continuous?

    or cancel

  • A former member

    I actually hadn't seen that blog post. It's an excellent explaination of camera movement and focus adjustment during long exposures though. I really need to read the Star Circle Academy blog more often. May - Yes, it was about half a second exposure at f5 and iso 100. One of the tricks is trying to remember that the movement in the image will appear as the opposite of the camera motion. So in this one the camera moved in a U shaped motion. Steven - That is a powerful question.

    or cancel

  • A former member

    Flickering lights and short exposure and fast movement? =)

    or cancel

  • Steven C.

    @Alex - close. Why were all the lights apparently flickering at the same time and rate?

    or cancel

  • A former member

    i don't know =) was making a semi-educated guess.

    or cancel

  • Steven C.

    Here is the answer: Nearly every light source in this photo is fed by 60 hz AC current. Our eyes don't notice it, but all those lights are flickering at a rate of 60 cycles per second. The movement of the camera in this case reveals the 60 hz cycle and shows each of the lights as dashed lines. All the lines are similarly dashed because they are all fed by 60 hz electricity. If you take a photograph lit by indoor light without a flash at 1/200 of a second you are likely to notice that sometimes your subject is lit, sometimes not - due to the same flickering lights phenomenon. So, give these each a try and see what you get! PS, I *think* it's possible to use the dashes to measure the angular speed of the camera motion AND the length of the exposure. I think it's also possible to determine the relative distances of each of the lights by comparing the lengths of their dashes. Anybody feel enough geek coming on to take a stab at these?

    or cancel

Want to comment on this photo?

Sign in, if you're already a member of this group or Join The Bay Area Photography & Exploration Society

Other photo albums

Move photo

Do you want to move this photo to “__ALBUM_NAME__”?

Are you sure you want to delete this photo?

Yes, I'm Sure

Are you sure you want to delete this comment?

Yes, I'm Sure

Our Sponsors

  • SlickPic

    SlickPic is a secure place to host and share your photos.

People in this
Meetup are also in:

Sign up

Meetup members, Log in

By clicking "Sign up" or "Sign up using Facebook", you confirm that you accept our Terms of Service & Privacy Policy