Screenwriting Group: Scene Readings

Fourth Wednesday meetup - Bring short scenes from your work in progress or completed script - 5-10 pages is ideal - to read and discuss. First time attendees and contributors are especially encouraged to share work, which should be able to be read / performed in around ten minutes or less allowing plenty of time for discussion and feedback.

Meeting is at the Borderlands Cafe, 870 Valencia st. (between 19th and 20th streets), in the Mission District of San Francisco.  The location is easily accessible via BART (Mission & 16th or 24th Street), MUNI 14 or 49 bus or the J-Church.  

 

Please bring printouts of your scenes, enough for as many people as you need to read.  There is no pressure to bring work to every meeting.  Just bring youself and be prepared to participate and have fun!

 

Call Howard,[masked] if you have any questions.

Special thanks to Borderlands for providing space for tonights meetup.

Join or login to comment.

  • steve h.

    Currently reading "Writing Screenplays That Sell" by Michael Hauge. I highly recommend it- fills in a lot of gaps.

    March 30, 2013

    • Leo M.

      I took a class from him about 13 years ago. His book is a bible of mine and has become quite dog-eared and tattered from use. He taught about MOS (without sound) and b.g. (back ground).

      March 30, 2013

    • steve h.

      Another good one: The Art of Dramatic Writing by Lajos Esri, mentioned in Paul Chitlik's book Rewrite.

      March 31, 2013

  • steve h.

    I thought I got more useful feedback on a few pages than I typically get on more. With a lot of pages it's hard to get to the content. What you hear about a few scenes will flavor what you do with all the scenes. It we wanted to get the larger scope of the piece it might be a good idea to read through the outline.

    I've been listening to interviews with producers and most of them talk about story story story- the need for a good one supporting the script.

    By the way, on a typical movie 5% of the production budget goes to story and screenplay. With movies often costing 10's of millions, that's a lot of money. Interested?

    March 28, 2013

  • Leo M.

    These 2 to 2 1/2 hours go by all too quickly. Pleased to report that every minute is put to good use. Last night there were 6 ambitious writers who stepped into the spotlight. Each of us benefited greatly.

    1 · March 28, 2013

    • Leo M.

      Merci, merci.

      March 28, 2013

  • David G H.

    I always come prepared with 9-10 pages (4-5 scenes) and if not read this time will certainly be read next time. To save time, why not limit the writer's explanation to a two or three sentence log-line and let the reader's questions flow from the understanding of the scene as it relates to the log-line. More like a pitch fest if there's a lot of writers attending.

    1 · March 28, 2013

  • steve h.

    Getting read is an important part of the creative process, which is the main reason why I think limiting the number of pages to 5 is a good idea when a lot of people have stuff.

    March 27, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    My niece is visiting from Oregon. Can't make it this time.

    March 23, 2013

  • steve h.

    The most important creative tool: Some way to capture ideas as they come to you. You've probably notice that ideas fly out of your head very quickly and are gone for good most of the time. My favorite way to capture them is a small stack of 3x5's which I always have in my shirt pocket. Ideas go into the slug list (outline) and then into the script.

    March 23, 2013

  • steve h.

    Key to moving your project forward: Daily effort. Well, maybe Saturday or Sunday off.

    March 19, 2013

    • David G H.

      Yes. Unless you're burned-out on a project. Then step away, do something else and go back with fresh eyes.

      March 19, 2013

    • steve h.

      True. I took a month off between draft and rewrite on Dark Twin and have worked other stories while doing the rewrite.

      March 19, 2013

  • steve h.

    How many scenes in a movie?
    247 slug lines in Chinatown.
    164 in Almost Famous.
    177 in Amadeus.

    1 · March 14, 2013

    • David G H.

      Thanks for the reality check, Steve. DH

      March 15, 2013

  • Nick R.

    If you go by emotional event / plot point / character value change, it's 40 to 60. Hard to count in a screenplay because they aren't always 1-to-1 with slug lines.

    1 · March 14, 2013

15 went

Your organizer's refund policy for Screenwriting Group: Scene Readings

Refunds are not offered for this Meetup.

Our Sponsors

People in this
Meetup are also in:

Create your own Meetup Group

Get started Learn more
Allison

Meetup has allowed me to meet people I wouldn't have met naturally - they're totally different than me.

Allison, started Women's Adventure Travel

Sign up

Meetup members, Log in

By clicking "Sign up" or "Sign up using Facebook", you confirm that you accept our Terms of Service & Privacy Policy