addressalign-toparrow-leftarrow-rightbackbellblockcalendarcameraccwchatcheckchevron-downchevron-leftchevron-rightchevron-small-downchevron-small-leftchevron-small-rightchevron-small-upchevron-upcircle-with-checkcircle-with-crosscircle-with-pluscrossdots-three-verticaleditemptyheartexporteye-with-lineeyefacebookfolderfullheartglobegmailgoogleimageimagesinstagramlinklocation-pinmagnifying-glassmailminusmoremuplabelShape 3 + Rectangle 1outlookpersonplusprice-ribbonImported LayersImported LayersImported Layersshieldstartickettrashtriangle-downtriangle-uptwitteruseryahoo

Re: [screenwriters-261] Question re: screenwriting credit

From: Gini Graham S.
Sent on: Saturday, November 3, 2012 12:16 PM
If you change the story and characters enough so it's not identifiable where the story came from, then you can probably avoid the credits problem.  People get inspired by things all the time, but then make it their own.  Otherwise, I recommend getting permissions in advance. Many people, especially if they have written an obscure story, will be flattered by the attention and willingly agree, assuming you can find them; maybe even offer them a percentage of whatever you might get for the film -- and if it's nothing, so be it.  

Gini Graham Scott, Ph.D.
Director, Changemakers
Changemakers Productions
750 La Playa, #952
San Francisco, CA 94121
(415)[masked]; Fax: (415)[masked]
[address removed]
www.ginigrahamscott.com
www.changemakersproductions.com
www.linkedin.com/in/changemakersproductions
www.twitter.com/giniscott
www.facebook.com/ginigrahamscott

--- On Sat, 11/3/12, Lee <[address removed]> wrote:

From: Lee <[address removed]>
Subject: Re: [screenwriters-261] Question re: screenwriting credit
To: [address removed]
Date: Saturday, November 3, 2012, 12:10 PM

Why would it make a difference?
I have already written it... would I just tell them I haven't?

This short story is so obscure, I don't actually anticipate much of a problem (who knows though, of course)...

Lee


On Sat, Nov 3, 2012 at 12:07 PM, steve hovland <[address removed]> wrote:
You should get the rights before you do it.
 
If you write first and try for rights later you will have problems.
 
I thought about doing adaptations but getting rights is such a pain I decided to learn how to do my own stories.
 
That can be done- Truby, McKee, others.
 
Steve


From: [address removed] [mailto:[address removed]] On Behalf Of Eric
Sent: Friday, November 02,[masked]:45 PM
To: [address removed]
Subject: Re: [screenwriters-261] Question re: screenwriting credit

What do you plan to do with this?

-Make it into a short: to show in festivals?

-Make it into a feature: and try and sell it to a distributor?

It makes a big difference how you intend to show it and if you plan to make money off of it or not.

Lawyers are expensive and not a cost that shows up on the screen.

On Fri, Nov 2, 2012 at 8:31 PM, Lee <[address removed]> wrote:
I recently finished up writing a short screenplay. The screenplay is an adaption from a short story written by someone I don't know.

Right now, I have the credit as "Written by Lee Stokes, adapted from a Story by Book Writer".

Which if it was a straight forward adaptation, I would move ahead with.
HOWEVER, the truth is that as I wrote the screenplay, I realized that I hated the ending in the book.
I liked the characters, the setup, and most of the story, but when the payoff came, I pretty much hated it.
As the screenplay is now, I'd say like 2/3 or 3/4 of the story is the authors, but the final piece is wholly mine. I mean, my ending is nothing like his, nor based in any way on his original ending.

So two questions:
1. how do I credit the writing?
2. how do I broach the situation to the author when the time comes to try to obtain rights?

Any thoughts, insights or tips appreciated. If whatever I wrote isn't clear, I am willing to try and explain further.

Lee

--
*Mattina Presto Luce (2010)*
Full Movie: *http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=esm6hzwk1xY*
IMDB Page: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1777594/combined
*LooseCharm Offers*






--
Please Note: If you hit "REPLY", your message will be sent to everyone on this mailing list ([address removed])
This message was sent by Lee ([address removed]) from San Francisco Screenwriting Group.
To learn more about Lee, visit his/her member profile
Set my mailing list to email me As they are sent | In one daily email | Don't send me mailing list messages

Meetup, PO Box 4668 #37895 New York, New York [masked] | [address removed]





--
Please Note: If you hit "REPLY", your message will be sent to everyone on this mailing list ([address removed])
This message was sent by Eric ([address removed]) from San Francisco Screenwriting Group.
To learn more about Eric, visit his/her member profile
Set my mailing list to email me As they are sent | In one daily email | Don't send me mailing list messages

Meetup, PO Box 4668 #37895 New York, New York[masked] | [address removed]




--
Please Note: If you hit "REPLY", your message will be sent to everyone on this mailing list ([address removed])
This message was sent by steve hovland ([address removed]) from San Francisco Screenwriting Group.
To learn more about steve hovland, visit his/her member profile



--
*Mattina Presto Luce (2010)*
Full Movie: *http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=esm6hzwk1xY*
IMDB Page: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1777594/combined
*LooseCharm Offers*






--
Please Note: If you hit "REPLY", your message will be sent to everyone on this mailing list ([address removed])
This message was sent by Lee ([address removed]) from San Francisco Screenwriting Group.
To learn more about Lee, visit his/her member profile
Set my mailing list to email me As they are sent | In one daily email | Don't send me mailing list messages

Meetup, PO Box 4668 #37895 New York, New York[masked] | [address removed]

Our Sponsors

People in this
Meetup are also in:

Sign up

Meetup members, Log in

By clicking "Sign up" or "Sign up using Facebook", you confirm that you accept our Terms of Service & Privacy Policy