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The Internet of Things

Two market dynamics promise to have an equally significant impact on the way we live, work and play: the Internet of Things and the Internet of People. In the realm of the Internet of People, ad-tech companies have led the way, pushing the limits of scale while managing billions of objects and terabytes of data with millisecond response times. But when you have to scale from serving hundreds of millions of people to billions of things, what are the opportunities and challenges that arise? What are the similarities and differences? What technologies can be reused, and what problems still remain to be solved? Marie-Anne Neimat will moderate a lively panel of experts as they define the Internet of Things vs. the Internet of People, examine what companies are trying to do and why, explore the various tech options that can support these use cases, and discuss the challenges and tips in implementation.

Panel participants:

Marie-Anne Neimat, Aerospike Advisor – moderator
Alok Batra, Chief Engineer & Chief Architect of GE Global Research – panelist
Mahbubul Alam, Head of Internet-of-Things at Cisco – panelist
Sukanta Ganguly, CTO, QuickPay – panelist
Brian Bulkowski, Aerospike Founder and CTO – panelist

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  • A former member
    A former member

    I think, the panel showed their perspectives, and those of their employers and their proposed approach to the opportunity. Their approach seems to be creating vast opportunity, as they appear to not be addressing a good number of key points. And, they are also legitimizing this business area with their marketing spend. So its a good thing at the end of the day :-) One of the beautiful aspects of the IoT business is the barrier to entry is reasonable, and the world is wide open. I want to thank Aerospike for hosting, and with wonderful hospitality. And I want to thank the panel for validating that there are indeed vast amounts of whitespace in this market that can/will be addressed by others - that they can later acquire :-) Just my $0.02 :-)

    June 6, 2013

  • Scott J.

    As my comment might have looked a *bit* grumpy, I'd like to build on Scott McNeil's comments that Aerospike was indeed an excellent host (and their speaker actually kept to their time limit which was very much appreciated)

    I guess I'm a bit of a dreamer and fully expect IoT to be very disruptive, overturning the entrenched players and creating (as well as destroying) a lot of value. The talks from Cisco and GE were perfectly fine but were a bit generic frankly. This will not business as usual! I was disappointed that *none* of the speakers addressed the significant opportunities (and challenges) of open standards. It is after all the internet of things, not a bunch of silos of things. I didn't hear anything last night that discussed or encouraged the need to break down those silos.

    1 · June 6, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    Thanks to Aerospike for not only hosting the Meetup, but for providing more than enough food, drink and chairs for the attendees.

    I'm not used to being so well cared for at a Meetup event, you've set the bar for all others. :-)

    1 · June 6, 2013

  • Godfrey

    Thank you Monica and Aerospike (thanks for the t-shirts too!). Appreciate time and effort put into the Meetup. Found the talks useful. Agree Q&A could have been longer. Good, inquisitive crowd.

    June 6, 2013

  • Jayna S.

    Personally, I would have to agree with Scott that this kind of event should be much shorter on the formal part and longer on spontaneous conversations. The panel presentations do help to establish a context for the rest, but rigorously enforced time limits (and actually less than ten minutes would be good) are needed, followed by more informal networking and followup time. I would love to have been able to get to know many more of the other attendees.

    June 5, 2013

    • Monica P.

      Great feedback. Felt like the conversation just got going when we ran out of time. This was our first IOT meetup. Moving forward, we will limit the scope of the topic so we can go deeper into the various questions that were brought up.

      June 6, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    Great speakers, awesome food and arrangements!

    June 6, 2013

  • Richard C.

    Good panel - interesting topics.

    1 · June 5, 2013

  • Scott J.

    Unfortunately, it was a rather 'typical panel' program where each person mostly talked about their company, each going way over their time slot. Nothing really substantive or insightful was covered.

    While it was a great place to meet other people and chat, almost everyone I talked to was very underwhelmed. There is so much amazing potential for the IoT. We need much more than corporate roadshows to inform and inspire...

    June 5, 2013

  • Marga

    I'm interested in the topic

    June 5, 2013

  • Madhu K.

    Sorry, have a conflict.

    June 5, 2013

  • Scott J.

    Brian, there are likely various 'compatibility layers' we can use to break down this problem. For example, we might be able to separate this problem into layers: protocol, communication, data storage, and access. For example, if your yet-another-zigbee net is gathering data in it's own freakish way, I may not care, as long as you store it in a standard format in a server I can get access to. If on the other hand, you want to mix/match vendors on the same net, then we've got a LOT of talking to do. My guess is that we'll start from the top, data storage/access as initial steps and work our way down.

    June 4, 2013

    • A former member
      A former member

      This is the model some of our partners are looking at. However, even the first step, say "federate home appliances" is a royal pain. Then, when you add it all up in a metro area like Tokyo, and add in the personal side of things in addition to the equipment side, it gets messy, very quickly. Looks like the meetup is going to be really useful for learning. I look forward to this.

      June 4, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    Sorry for it can't make it

    June 4, 2013

  • brian b.

    The federation angle is really interesting. Some of the SV IOT discussion have also focused on who "has the keys" - can we agree on an flavor of OpenID? Or will buying a sensor include a shrink-wrap that allows sharing of the data?

    Today the internet of things are still islands - the island of parking information, the island of traffic information, the island of power information. All with their own web services interfaces. Honestly, we're unlikely to get a one-stop-shop without services that use this data pushing for some form of standardization.

    Aerospike's interest is that a high-scale database is needed to serve that kind of centralized data - and storing & querying each data pool (?"mart") individually.

    I look forward to the discussion.

    June 4, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    food for thought : http://www.scribd.com/doc/144630994/The-Future-of-Wiretapping-–-The-IEEE-Security-Privacy-webinar

    The concept of what is being "wiretapped" is also open for grabs. I expect we'll generate a ton of legal precedents along the way :-) Looks like we're going to have a lively event ...

    May 30, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    Scott, I agree with the top level premise. Some of the use cases I'm tinkering with include medical monitoring as well as energy; which get interesting. The sales-push aspect of LBS is also very interesting and leads one to think of opt-in models. In all these cases r/t response as part of the SLA can add value, and all tie in to the UX and end-value. I look forward to an active discussion next week ...

    May 30, 2013

  • Scott J.

    Manu, I hope we have have a tiered discussion around security. Some public devices will want to interact with you freely (think bus stops/movie posters). Others will clearly need identity and security. What I hope we can get is a federated ID system so a system can know if it is really you and act accordingly. This puts most of the security UX up front, on first usage.

    May 30, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    Interested in standards for equipment interfacing, as well understanding how privacy and security will be integrated into solutions. And what the panel sees as key application drivers and use cases.

    May 30, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    Scale -IS- the 800-pound Gorilla in the room...

    May 24, 2013

  • Chuan L.

    sorry, out of country

    April 29, 2013

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