Gardening by Moon Sign

Gardening by the signs of the moon. I don't really understand it myself, yet it's something I've been doing off and on for about 10 years. I say off and on, because ultimately I'm a lazy gardener and I'm alway playing catch up, so I don't always have the info I need in time to make it work. I'm also subject to the issues that most Seattle gardeners struggle with, which is a small planting window in the early spring. Between work, rain, wet soil, and a serious lack of daylight hours, I often feel lucky just to have found time to get things in the ground.

Today I feel doubly lucky. I only have a couple of hours at the office, there's no rain on the horizon, and my planting guide says that it's the perfect day to sow my spinach, cabbage, peas, and beans directly in the garden. And while I'm at it, it's also the perfect day to start flower and vegetable seeds inside. Which is just what I was planning to do anyway.

Now, like I said, I'm not fully versed on the why and how of mood sign gardening. And those of you who have met me know I'm not the airy fairy type. Far from it. I'm a snarky eye roller on the best of days. I started off grabbing a little Ed Hume Garden Guide off of a seed rack when I was a t Chubby & Tubby (remember them?). I sort of worked some of it into my routine. But a few years ago I experimented with planting as my time permitted, and planting a row according to the guide. Some nights I was out in the dark and cold getting seeds in barely before the stroke of midnight. And I have to say, I saw a clear difference. The rows planted according to the guide were stronger, healthier plants, which obviously led to heavier yields.

So, a few years ago I asked for a proper planting guide as a birthday gift. I got it, and was dumfounded. It assumed a knowledge much greater than mine. It would list a zodiac sign, and assume you knew what to do during that sign. I didn't. So now it's back to the Ed Hume guide. It's a whopping $1.79 a year, but an invaluable investment if you're taking the time to do all that work anyway. Give it a try. If you're rolling your eyes at the end of the growing season, tell me about it. I'd like to hear about your experience.

Since you're most likely reading this after today, here are a few future dates to look out for: March 9th and 10th, plant spinach, cabbage, lettuce and chard. March 13th and 14th, start flower, veg, and tomato seeds inside. March 20th, plant onions (Ouch! I don't want to wait that long, but I'm going to try). March 22, apply organic fertilizer. March 24th and 25th, plant radishes, dahlias, and potatoes.

A bit more info? Gardeningbythemoon.com

Table of Contents

Page title Most recent update Last edited by
Gardening by Moon Sign March 5, 2011 1:31 PM former member
Natural Health Nutrition March 1, 2011 11:14 AM Jirius I.
Biodiesel March 5, 2011 1:55 PM former member
Dehydrating March 1, 2011 11:00 AM former member
Chickens September 19, 2011 1:25 PM Michelle R.
Sewing and home crafts March 1, 2011 10:57 AM former member
Bees March 25, 2011 9:47 AM former member
Plants March 1, 2011 10:51 AM former member
Gardening- Home or Small Scale vegetable March 1, 2011 11:09 AM Jirius I.
Canning March 1, 2011 10:46 AM former member
Gardening- Large Scale Agriculture or Permaculture March 1, 2011 10:42 AM former member
About Urban Homesteaders March 1, 2011 10:37 AM former member

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