Silicon Valley Automotive Open Source Message Board › smart headlights that bend around corners and use adaptive LED control to im

smart headlights that bend around corners and use adaptive LED control to implement high-beams

Alison C.
user 8979363
Group Organizer
Mountain View, CA
Post #: 490
Noah R.
user 90711022
Palo Alto, CA
Post #: 3
I wonder if Apple maps controls the headlights? wink Seriously though how could GPS improve on the speed/steeringwheel algorithm for headlight control?

The adaptive high beams aren't legal in the USA if I recall correctly.
Alison C.
user 8979363
Group Organizer
Mountain View, CA
Post #: 525
@noahrogers In drive-by-wire systems, the steering wheel signals driver heading intent to the vehicle, but does not directly control it. The vehicle systems will correct for oversteer and understeer and route around potholes and debris in the fanciest shipping vehicles already.
Noah R.
user 90711022
Palo Alto, CA
Post #: 7
Hmmm... I was referring to the headlights, not steer-by-wire...

I understand steer-by-wire is beneficial for traction control, but like ELSD, it has another benefit. While I'm neither a fan of anything overriding , nor replacing my inputs, because I enjoy driving, I absolutely believe steer-by-wire is the correct choice for every car for a physics reason: The effective ackermann geometry changes under load as tire deflection increases. Current systems are compromised with a static solution, often tuned to the OEM tire and suspension choices. In other words a car will often experience oversteer in low-g slip and understeer in high-g slip. You might have noticed race cars using negative ackermann, ie F1 cars the outside wheel turns more than the inside wheel which seems backwards, but this is to negate the huge deflection of the soft-sidewall tires (which I would call a safer tire for lots of reasons) under the premise that the outside wheel's contact patch is being consistently placed closer to a straight line path under the relatively high-g cornering... and in a car the corners slowly the ackermann might even be tuned to 120% or exponential rate of rise in the thought that it's better to scrub off the inside tire like it's worthless (throw some ridiculously large sway bars in there too! lift that inside wheel!) for consistency and comfort (all the above to decrease spring-rate) rather than outright cornering efficiency. Steer-by-wire solves this compromise and gives more traction potential "under the curve" so to speak with simple algorithims and can be updated with tire change or magnetic suspension "patch updates" and, like fuel injection with throttle mapping, (i like to relate all electric-drivetrain-type innovations to fuel injection) it becomes second nature to the driver, and is simply an easier maneuver to perform. So just like fuel injection and ELSD the car simply becomes more capable, effiecient, cheaper, lighter, simpler, and flexible... infinitely tunable. Can even do fun stuff like twelves inches of toe-in in the event of a brake failure!!!

I've met many-a-bay-area-engineer who discounts cornering ability in an economy car, but slowing down to corner is often overlooked part of real-world fuel economy. It would be an interesting test to find the EXACT number of curvy miles it takes to have eco tires' benefits negated because safely cornering at 0.3g instead of 0.6g means you have to keep slowing and accelerating between turns (or just go half the speed limit as they do haha).

Can you link the routing around potholes/debris in shipping vehicles?
Alison C.
user 8979363
Group Organizer
Mountain View, CA
Post #: 535
The pothole work is by Mercedes. The link should be earlier on this forum.
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