Silicon Valley Automotive Open Source Message Board › "Should Automakers Get Out Of The Infotainment Business?"

"Should Automakers Get Out Of The Infotainment Business?"

Eunice
user 9678161
Palo Alto, CA
Post #: 9
No, I am not buying this article, although there are a couple of valid points.

http://seekingalpha.c...­
Alison C.
user 8979363
Group Organizer
Mountain View, CA
Post #: 517
I hear this argument all the time. The problem is that folks don't want to leave the phone in the car when they depart, so appealing features like using the navigation on the phone to find a car in a big parking lot, or using the phone to check a car's state of charge, or remotely starting the car's climate control system, will not work without installed connectivity. It's not clear from the safety and security point of view allowing a brought-in device to *control* vehicle systems while driving is. While I'm sure we'll see phones and tablets co-exist along with installed systems, there's no reason to choose. I don't want to store my contacts list (for example) in the car's database or download music and games to it. There streaming from a device makes sense.
Dean L.
user 8824341
Mountain View, CA
Post #: 16
I would tend to agree with the article (I had to do the free registration in order to read the entire article). Current ownership life cycle of a car is much longer than a smart phone, add to that the software update cycle.

I think having an industry defined HMI/interface approach is a good one. On the one hand, I think consumers would desire the agileness of mobile apps ecosystem for non-safety critical applications; but on the other hand, their rapid-to-market approaches should be tempered for safety critical or driving information applications (navigation, etc).

Regarding connectivity, I agree that current day automobiles still solely rely on the occupant's smart phone for such. But it doesn't mean it has to stay that way. I thought I heard that the Chevy Volt has build-in connectivity capability? It may currently be enabled thru their OnStar service, and that also doesn't have to stay that way.

I think from the auto maker's perspective, it's still down to revenue. How could they package features such that they could get consumers to fork over $$.

Example: I might be shopping for a new vehicle later this year. I have no desire for the build-in core GPS navigation feature on the car and pay in order of ~$1k for it. I would like to use my choice of mobile GPS nav apps instead for their route finding capability with rapid peer-to-peer traffic updates. BUT, for the cockpit HMI symbology, etc, I want that to be provided by the auto maker HMI designers instead of mobile app developers.

Of course, the automakers package other desirable features such as blind spot monitoring, land departures, etc... along with their GPS nav function. Argh!
Noah R.
user 90711022
Palo Alto, CA
Post #: 1
The Nissan Versa is best selling in the sub-compact class because of it's low price point, but I'm sure everyone that buys it still has a smartphone.

And I would guess the chipsets are relatively cheap and an easy plug-in to the relay box while the software is an expensive development item.
... am a I correct?

So the most elegant solution may be to simply provide a optional hardware solution that can mirror ios jellybean or ubuntu.

This would keep customers sane and keep the car pricing competitive.
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