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Sketch On! Message Board Resources and References - Public viewable › Copying after the Masters . . . a resource

Copying after the Masters . . . a resource

Regina
erginartesia
Group Organizer
Alexandria, VA
Post #: 123
One of the core uses of drawing is to copy after master works and artists. A highly prized technique (that at one time was mandatory teaching and still is in eastern art), one thing we artists know is that drawing something gives you a whole new way to see it.

Here is the virtual collection of drawings from the Metropolitan Museum of Art! There are nearly 6,000 works in this database! Now, I'll give ya that not every piece has a corresponding photo of it. But it appears that better than half of the collection is photographed.

So, enjoy! Share your favs on this forum! Shall we pick a fav and all share? (A sort of artist version of a book discussion love struck?
Regina
erginartesia
Group Organizer
Alexandria, VA
Post #: 124
Head popping out the page!
(Jean-)Antoine Watteau (French, Valenciennes 1684–1721 Nogent-sur-Marne)

is particularly famous for his drawings, and you can see why from this image (also, I think he might have had something to do with the whole way we use pastels these days, not sure).

It appears to me that his chin is literally walking out the page. If you examine the image closely, it is not particularly overworked, heavily filled in... it's all the more magnificent for those attributes.

One subtle technique seems to be a very light rubbing in of the colors of the man's skin into the background part of the pic. You almost don't even see it unless you deliberately look. The variation between that background and the head is just enough to make the head pop to life.

Amazing!
A former member
Post #: 241
One of the core uses of drawing is to copy after master works and artists. A highly prized technique (that at one time was mandatory teaching and still is in eastern art), one thing we artists know is that drawing something gives you a whole new way to see it.

Here is the virtual collection of drawings from the Metropolitan Museum of Art! There are nearly 6,000 works in this database! Now, I'll give ya that not every piece has a corresponding photo of it. But it appears that better than half of the collection is photographed.

So, enjoy! Share your favs on this forum! Shall we pick a fav and all share? (A sort of artist version of a book discussion love struck?

Thanks for the link, I will look at it. I too learned from this way.
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