Purisima Creek Redwoods Open Space Preserve: 7-Mile Moderate Hike

There are 10 total spaces available at the trailhead, including 3 on the roadside. There’s no way to know how many will be available on Saturday. When we scouted the hike on Tuesday, there were only two parking spaces left, so we need to consolidate into as few cars as possible so we can get everyone to the hike. Let’s rendezvous at the New Leaf Market which is on the NE corner of the intersection of 92 and highway 1. Meet at the New Leaf Market sign on 92, in front of the store and parking lot at 12:45. We can shuttle people back and forth from that parking lot if we need to. 

We will make this work so everyone can attend! 

This is a 7-mile loop that captures the best of this preserve: redwoods, creek, chaparral, and great views. This hike is moderate, due to the elevation changes. Total elevation change is about 1400 feet.  

Note: Please wear shoes with good traction -- preferably hiking shoes. You may wish to bring a sandwich or snacks.

Meeting Place: Near the New Leaf Market sign on 92 at NE corner of 92 and Hwy 1

Hike Leader: Steve

No entrance or parking fees. 

Hiking time: 3 1/2 hours.

Rules: Most trails are multi-use. A few trails are open to hikers only. Dogs are not allowed in the preserve. Preserve is open from dawn to 1/2 hour after sunset.

Pit toilet less than 0.1 mile up the trail. Maps available at the information signboard, also less than 0.1 mile from the trailhead.

Exposure: Mostly shaded, with some sunny stretches.

Trail traffic: Moderate. 

Trail surfacesDirt trails and fire roads.

SeasonNice any time; very pretty in autumn.

Get driving or public transit directions from Transit and Trails:
http://www.transitandtrails.org/trailheads/425

GPS Coordinates* for Trailhead:
Latitude 37°26'15.16"N
Longitude 122°22'14.20"W
(* based on Google Earth data, shown as degrees, minutes, seconds)

Gas, food, and lodging:
Pay phone, stores, gas, lodging, and restaurants back in Half Moon Bay. No camping in the preserve. Nearest camping is at Half Moon Bay State Beach. Other camping options: Butano State Park and Portola Redwoods State Park.

There is no direct public transportation to this trailhead.

The Official Story:
MROSD's Purisima page.
MROSD field office[masked]

Map Choices:
 This hike is described and mapped in 60 Hikes within 60 Miles: San Francisco, by Jane Huber. Order this book from Amazon.com.
• Map from MROSD (download pdf). 
• Peninsula Tales and Trails, by David Weintraub (order this book from Amazon.com) has an overview of the preserve, descriptions of hikes, and simple maps. 
• Afoot and Afield: San Francisco Bay Area, by David Weintraub (order this book from Amazon.com) has a great map and descriptions of a Purisima Creek hike. 
• Trail Map of the Central Peninsula, by the Trail Center (order this map from Amazon.com) is an excellent guide to the preserve.
• Peninsula Trails, by Jean Rusmore, has a simple map and trail descriptions (order this book from Amazon.com). 
• Tom Taber's The Santa Cruz Mountains Trail Book has a simple map and trail descriptions (order this book from Amazon.com).
• Jean Rusmore's The Bay Area Ridge Trail(order this book from Amazon.com) has a simple map and preserve descriptions. 

• View 81 photos from the featured hike."

Text above and below quoted from Jane Huber's Bay Area Hiker Web site.

"Purisima Creek Redwoods Open Space Preserve is the firstpreserve west of Skyline Boulevard as you travel south from CA 92. It's justifiably popular with cyclists and hikers; Purisima is a convenient distance from San Francisco (and the Santa Clara Valley) and is a pristine showcase for the Santa Cruz Mountains' western slope. Tall (most second-growth) redwoods, year round burbling creeks, and chaparral-studded slopes with views to the ocean all can be found here. 
     

With elevation ranging from around 400 to 2100 feet, and over 3000 acres, there are a few challenging long loop and out-and-back hikes.   
     

Purisima is truly a preserve for all seasons. From late winter into late summer there are a variety of flowering shrubs and deep woods wildflowers. Purisima Creek Trail and the forested section of Craig Britton Trail are reliably cool when summer temperatures soar, and coastal fog often reaches all the way into the western slopes of the preserve's mountains. Although winter storms soak the fire roads and trails, creating muddy conditions, cool weather encourages long hikes that are tougher in the hot months of the year. In autumn big leaf maples are pretty along Purisima Creek, one of several year-round streams that murmur with the soothing sounds of cool water.
     

For the featured hike, start at the Higgins-Purisima Trailhead on Purisima Creek Trail. After about 200 feet, there's an information signboard, and a few steps further, a pit toilet. Whittemore Gulch Trail and Harkins Ridge Trail start off to the left at a signed junction. Keep going straight on Purisima Creek Trail. 
     

This wide, multi-use trail is initially almost level, as it follows along the banks of the creek. Redwoods provide shade and habitat for many banana slugs, as well as redwood sorrel, thimbleberry, huckleberry, hazelnut, stream violet, trillium, ferns, starflower, and forget-me-not. Alder, elderberry, and big leaf maple occupy the middle ground, way below the redwoods but above the flowers and shrubs. Purisima Creek Trail stays cool on a hot day, but can be very muddy in the winter and early spring. Perhaps the peak time to hike the trail is mid June to mid July, when the berries ripen on the prolific thimbleberry plants. With so many bushes, it's acceptable to taste a berry or two (of course, large scale collecting, while tempting, is against the rules).The berries, which look a lot like raspberries, are juicy and tart, and may be the most beloved of all the bay area wild edibles. Also look for tiny wood strawberries, which ripen just before the thimbleberries, hiding beneath their distinctive club shaped leaves. At about 1.05 mile, Borden Hatch Mill Trail begins on the right side of the trail at a signed junction.Continue straight on Purisima Creek Trail.
      

The grade picks up a bit, but it's still an easy walk. Elk clover and stinging nettles are common in the dampest areas along the trail. After crossing a bridge, you'll reach the junction with Grabtown Gulch Trail, at about 1.42 miles. Continue straight on Purisima Creek Trail.
     

The trail crosses over another bridge, and begins to climb with more purpose. Wild rose, blue witch nightshade, and iris brighten the shaded redwood forest in spring, while creambush can be seen in bloom later in summer. Tanoaks make an appearance. There's one more bridge to cross, and then Purisima Creek Trail curves left and climbs steadily to a signed junction at about 2.30 miles. Purisima Creek Trail continues uphill another 1.8 miles, to the smaller Skyline Boulevard trailhead. Turn left onto Craig Britton Trail (formerly Soda Gulch Trail), which is signed as a hiking only trail (but does get bicycle traffic, so beware).
      

Narrow Craig Britton Trail winds along canyon walls through a deep redwood forest. This quiet path is a segment of the Bay Area Ridge Trail. Water flows downhill, on the way to join Purisima Creek; the first bridge is a short distance from the junction. Look for clintonia blooming in late spring; in summer the plant's small blue berries are conspicuous. Craig Britton Trail rises to a grassy spot, where views to the south reveal the ridge with the preserve's highest elevation. The vegetation differs dramatically through this stretch, where monkeyflower, lizardtail, scorpionweed, poison oak, ceanothus, coffeeberry, creambush, strawberry, and honeysuckle accompany a few coast live oaks. As you continue to climb through the forest, look for a handful of huge tanoaks, as well as some maple, blue elderberry, and hazelnut.Soon, Craig Britton Trail dips back under the redwoods, crossing Soda Gulch Creek. In August, look for red baneberry and helleborine, a summer orchid. A landslide forced an irregular and steep trail rerouting just past the bridge, and then the grade picks up some more. When you reach the next open and grassy area, look to the west for views all the way to the ocean. On a hike through here one day in June, the trail was overgrown with grass, and California sister butterflies seemed to be present in plague proportions. Cow parsnip, fringecups, rosilla, yarrow, beeplant, and blue-eyed grass may be seen trailside. As Craig Britton Trail climbs uphill through a series of switchbacks, the vegetation shifts to chaparral. Coyote brush, toyon, yerba santa, California coffeeberry, ceanothus, and poison oak are common. The bright blossoms of Indian paintbrush and monkeyflower contrast the army green of the shrubs in spring. A patch of madrones sits off the side of the trail, across from a swath of thimbleberry bushes. Hazelnut is common through here as well. Tanoak, coast live oak, and Douglas fir gain prominence as you edge closer to the end of the trail at about 4.90 miles.  From this signed junction, Harkins Ridge Trail climbs to the right (taking the Bay Area Ridge Trail with it), on the way to the preserve's main trailhead. (If you'd like to extend this hike, turn right on Harkins Ridge, turn left onto North Ridge Trail, and then take Whittemore Gulch Trail back to the trailhead. This option adds about 2 miles, and climbs to about 1800 feet before dropping back down to 400 feet.) Turn left onto Harkins Ridge Trail.
     

This wide, occasionally rocky multi-use trail signals its intentions right away, as it begins a sharp descent to the west. Douglas fir, redwood, and tanoak provide some shade, but there are numerous opportunities for views to the north (which include parts of North Ridge Trail), and to the west. In the understory you may see huckleberry, creambush, strawberry, columbine, lupines, ceanothus, gooseberry, hazelnut, and pinkflowering currant. There are a few chinquapins and even a handful of manzanita. Stay alert for cyclists descending on the trail; some sections are very steep.  Harkins Ridge Trail throws a few short ascents at you, but they are always followed with abrupt drops. After about a mile of rolling downhill, the trail makes a broad sweeping turn to the left and begins a final descent at a moderate grade. Broom, lizardtail, coffeeberry, coyote brush, California sagebrush, and poison hemlock line the trail. Redwoods begin to take over, and the trail enters deep shade. You might see pinkflowering currant, which puts forth bright pink blossoms in winter. At about 6.90 miles, Harkins Ridge Trail runs out of steam and ends at a signed junction with Whittemore Gulch Trail. Turn left, cross one final bridge, and then turn right to return to the trailhead." 

TrailheadPurisima Creek TrailSoda Gulch TrailSoda Gulch TrailChaparral on Soda Gulch TrailA look back uphill on Harkins Ridge TrailView from Harkins Ridge TrailHarkins Ridge Trail

Text above quoted from Jane Huber's Bay Area Hiker Web site.

*****

The organizer, assistant organizers and event hosts in this group are not professional guides. The function of the organizer is only to organize the trip. each person who signs up for a trip/meetup/ or outing is responsible for his or her own safety and the safety of his or her guests. By signing up for a hike, or any other event organized by this group, you are acknowledging that you are aware and have made your guests aware of the risks, dangers and hazards associated with any outdoor activity and freely accept and fully assume all such risks, dangers and hazards, and further agree to release and discharge the organizer, assistant organizers and event hosts of this Meetup group from and against any and all liability arising from your and your guest's participation in the group activities. 

*****



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  • Annette

    Thanks Steve for scouting the hike earlier in the week, driving us to the trail head and leading us. Im guessing due to trafiic it was a small group but a beautiful hike with great trails and great conversation! See you next time.

    January 18, 2014

  • Annette

    Its 1:05 we are still waiting at new leaf for another 10 minutes...message back if yiur still coming

    January 18, 2014

  • Annette

    Its 1:05 we are still waiting at new leaf for another 10 minutes...message back if yiur still coming

    January 18, 2014

  • Steve

    See you all at 12:45.

    January 18, 2014

  • Brian

    Hamdanil, Yes, I can give you a ride at PH P&R. Will set mtg time next week. MY car is filled now. Brian

    January 7, 2014

    • Hamdanil R.

      Hi Brian. Sorry, something else come up and I won't be able to make the hike this time. Feel free to offer the seat to somebody else who wants a ride

      January 12, 2014

    • Guan H.

      Whoops. Work has come up so I gotta cancel too. I'm sure you'll find some other folks from the waitlist.

      January 14, 2014

  • christine d.

    Love to be on the waiting list for this one! ;) Looks awesome!

    January 13, 2014

  • A former member
    A former member

    How do I get on the wait list?

    1 · January 11, 2014

  • Brian

    Guan, I can give you a ride at PM P&R. Will probably set mtg time next week. Brian

    January 7, 2014

    • Hamdanil R.

      Can I join you too if you still have space? What time are you leaving from PM P&R?

      January 7, 2014

    • Guan H.

      Thanks. You can call or text me at[masked] when you want to get in contact.

      January 8, 2014

  • Brian

    I can provide rides at the Page Mill Park and Ride.

    January 6, 2014

    • Guan H.

      I can meet up there if you still have space. Thanks!

      January 6, 2014

  • Mai T.

    I am coming from San Jose/Saratoga if you want to carpool

    November 26, 2013

    • Mai T.

      Jojo, something came up so I'm unable to attend this one. I hope you find a ride! See you on another hike :)

      January 6, 2014

    • Jojo V.

      Thanks Mai. Hope to see you on another hike.

      January 6, 2014

  • Jojo V.

    I am interested to ride with a carpool coming from San Jose close to 280/Winchester Blvd. Thanks

    January 6, 2014

  • Guan H.

    Any cars looking for passengers? I can bike or bus to any of the locations to meet up. Thanks!

    January 6, 2014

  • Johanna

    Is there a waitlist?

    January 5, 2014

  • Hamdanil R.

    Should we organize a meeting point for carpool, since the parking is small?

    January 5, 2014

  • Nalini

    Plan to be there.

    January 5, 2014

  • Marzban

    Love to hike among redwoods, but got roped into helping a friend move.

    January 2, 2014

  • Marzban

    Love to hike among redwoods. :-)

    January 1, 2014

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