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Re: [alternativeenergy-224] Solar Power at Grid Parity Cost in Several Countries

From: Rohn B.
Sent on: Thursday, April 11, 2013 5:40 PM
Apparently even in the United States we are getting close to grid parity for individual rooftop solar.  It may depend on who's numbers one is looking at and it probably depends on location.  At any rate 2/3 of the cost of rooftop solar is installation cost so that looks like a ripe area to reduce cost perhaps more so than concentrating on the cost of solar cells.  However, as the efficiency of the cells increase if the cost of the cells remains about the same then the installation cost goes down since the area required for the same amount of power is less.  My comment about coal for heat actually pertained to heat for power generation not space heating.  Apparently TEP still uses a large amount of coal in the power station in the south part of town by the freeway.  Their plans are to sign long term coal contracts 10 to 15 years in the future.  That's the coal I was talking about. We in the dessert of Arizona have so little need for space heating that it makes it very difficult to justify a solar heat system on a cost basis.  However, on Philosophical grounds it just seems like the right thing to do especially if one can piggyback the space heating on a water heating system or on a PV power system.  At any rate it seems to me that solar proponents are looking at the grid parity of rooftop solar and making the leap to overall grid parity for any solar electric power.  The trend is in the right direction but it remains to be seen how soon we will get there and to what extent, as a percent of overall electric supply, solar can supply.  The percent that solar can supply to the total demand obviously varies by where it is i.e. Arizona ought to eventually have a high percentage but other areas of the US will have more challenges.



From: David R <[address removed]>
To: [address removed]
Sent: Thursday, April 11,[masked]:00 PM
Subject: Re: [alternativeenergy-224] Solar Power at Grid Parity Cost in Several Countries

I think that's because they are talking about large scale solar systems (like the one in the Mohave) competing with grid power costs.  You're talking about individual solar panels mounted on each home requiring installers.  Those are still not cost effective versus cheap coal, wherever it comes from.....that and they cut out most of the free government money which helped lower the price somewhat.....

Not to worry, solar's day will come soon.....


On Thu, Apr 11, 2013 at 12:07 PM, Rohn Brown <[address removed]> wrote:
Mean while in Tucson, the most progressive city in Arizona, Solar installers have laid off about half of their employees and we ship coal over a thousand miles (some even from Wyoming) for heat (guess the sun doesn't shine here).  Go figure.
 

From: Mitchell <[address removed]>
To: [address removed]
Sent: Thursday, April 11,[masked]:05 AM
Subject: [alternativeenergy-224] Solar Power at Grid Parity Cost in Several Countries

German bank reports solar power cost in India and Italy has reached grid parity

http://phys.org/news/2013-04-german-bank-solar-power-india.html?goback=%2Egde_94811_member_231102802

(Phys.org) —Germany's Deutsche Bank has released a report that
concludes that generating electricity using solar collectors has
reached grid parity—cost competitiveness with other industry standard
sources—in some countries. Analysts with the bank claim that both
India and Italy have reached grid parity and that other countries are
poised to do so over the next couple of years. Ads by Google
Affordable Solar Power - Solar Solutions That Fit Any Budget $0/Down,
Pay Nothing Out of Pocket - paramountsolar.com/anybudget From the time
solar collectors were invented and made for sale, deriving electricity
using them has cost more than doing so from traditional sources—mainly
coal fired plants. Because of that, solar energy has not grown as fast
as some would like and its increased use in recent years has come
about only because of government subsidies. Over time however, prices
for solar panel components has slowly dropped making them much more
price competitive. To achieve grid parity, solar power must be cost
competitive with coal or other sources without relying on government
or corporate subsidies. The German Bank is particularly optimistic
about solar power price parity in India, the U.S., China, the U.K.,
Germany, Spain and Italy and because of that is forecasting a 20
percent (30 GW) increase in worldwide demand this year—it's already
pushed above 100 GW. They note that Germany alone accounts for
approximately a third of all solar power production, but project that
China will soon surpass that country because of a very strong push by
the government there. India too is making a strong push—the government
has set a goal of producing 20 GW by 2022. The U.S. is also making
strides with construction underway in the Mojave Desert of what will
soon be the largest solar farm in the world. Because of the optimistic
numbers seen over the past year, the Deutsche Bank is suggesting the
world is on a path that will mean moving from solar power as a
subsidized source to one that is considered sustainable much sooner
than industry analysts had predicted. Also, despite the large increase
in numbers of solar farms, and their size, the bank believes that
rooftop solar installations will lead the way to grid parity and that
it will happen without the traditional government subsidies used to
entice both commercial and residential customers.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-04-german-bank-solar-power-india.html#jCp



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