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Wild Edibles

The address to the park is:

 

2200 Rosstown Rd, Lewisberry, PA 17339

Until the meetup takes place, consider getting a copy of a wild edible field guide like Petersons or Bradford Angier.  Look through it to become familiar with how the plants are listed.  Most are alphabetically listed.  This way, when we come across a plant, you can turn to that particular page.  I will have colored pictures of some of the plants we'll come across, with as much info about the plant in regards to edible parts as I can.  These will be available to all that come, in case you don't have a field guide.

 

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  • Melissa D.

    Got this in an email from my local extension office:

    Poison Hemlock
    This year, poison hemlock, the same poisonous weed that killed Socrates, has “taken off” across the state, according to Bill Curran, Professor of Weed Science at Penn State University. “It’s just about everywhere” from Lancaster to Centre counties. It’s usually found growing in places such as roadsides, ditches, stream banks, fence lines, pastures, meadows, and field edges, preferring moist soil but able to survive in dry sites. Right now, it is very noticeable, with its towering stalks of white flower clusters forming large patches across the landscape.

    June 14, 2013

    • Melissa D.

      The plant is a biennial, which means that the first year, it produces a low rosette of leaves; in the second year, it produces the flowering stalk, sets seeds, and then dies. Reproduction is by seed, and one plant can produce thousands of seeds.

      I recently visited the Mechanicsburg community garden, only to find a poison hemlock plant sprouting at the edge of a plot. The gardener had been planning to leave it there – someone had told him it might be edible. I recommended careful digging and disposal instead.

      With food foraging becoming increasingly popular, it is essential that wild plants or weeds be correctly identified with absolute certainty before being consumed; when in doubt, leave it out (of your mouth).

      June 14, 2013

    • A former member
      A former member

      Thanks for the vital info

      June 14, 2013

  • l

    Oh, and thank you all for your positive feedback. Next year, we'll do better. But check it out. This morning I boiled some lambs quarters for about 45 seconds, drained them, put them in a frying pan with some guinea eggs Brain gave me, and scrambled them up. Very good taste without pepper, salt, or any other condiments. What can I eat next?

    3 · June 11, 2013

    • A former member
      A former member

      Dandelion !

      June 11, 2013

    • l

      Nah, this time of year, they don't taste the best. I think I'll have somemore cattail.

      June 12, 2013

  • l

    Bill, what book do you have?

    June 11, 2013

  • l

    I agree with the directions comments. I didn't realize, being knew to the tools of this site, that the members wouldn't see what I put in the comments section unless they specifically looked at it. So in the future, I will correct this. The next event that I posted regarding primitive fire making and knife skills, will have specific directions once Lou and I coordinate the places.

    1 · June 11, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    I have a medicinal plants textbook if anyone wants to know the particular uses for plants that you discovered this past weekend.

    Please send me a note and I will post information on particular plant. I will keep it concise and relevant.

    Cheers

    Bill

    1 · June 11, 2013

  • Elizabeth K

    as for directions...there were very detailed directions in the comments below, however it would be nice to have them up top in the event description where they are easy to find.

    1 · June 11, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    Fellow foragers, here is a fantastic website to check out.

    http://www.eattheweeds.com/

    2 · June 11, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    great

    June 9, 2013

  • Elizabeth K

    good times. very impressed with ed's fast track knowledge.

    June 9, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    Thank you Ed & Brian (and let's not forget Linda!!). Learned a lot!!! It will take me like, FOREVER, to know these but it's all worth it. I do remember quite a bit more than I thought I would when we left. I look forward to more meetups in the future!!

    June 9, 2013

  • Brian

    Always have a great time with this group got to renew my knowledge of some of these plants and even learn a few new ones! nice to see everyone old and new to the group and hope to see you all again soon!

    June 9, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    Thank you for putting this together, Ed and Brian. This was one of the more informative wild edibles walks I've been on. I learned a bit and had a great time.

    June 9, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    Thanks everyone who organized and/ or brought information to the event! Very informative and equally enjoyable.

    June 9, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    thanks for taggig the photos, nice to be able to recall what we learned

    June 9, 2013

  • Tony G.

    Finally, I am beginning to recognize some wild edibles! :-)

    1 · June 9, 2013

  • l

    John. I agree it's important to know how to prepare the edibles, but how much time do you have. Here's the thing. I want to know what plants and parts are edible for "on the fly". But I also have a book on preparation of some of the plants. Most plants that we covered today are eat on the go. Others are prepared, mostly by boiling if you want to. There are a few manuals that tell us how to prepare the edibles. Check out Samual Thayers Natures Garden and Natures Harvest. This guy goes into detail on how to prepare certain edibles. Although, as I mentioned at the meetup, in most survival situations, you're going from point A to point B. Say, from a car breakdown in the fall, to an area miles away where you know you'll find help. But you don't have time to stop and "prepare" the edibles. So you need to eat on the fly. These, my friend, are the plants I want to learn first. But DO get a copy of these books. He goes into depth and detail.

    4 · June 9, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    The information and education I got today was well worth the trip.
    Thanks

    1 · June 9, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    Thanks Ed and Brian. Look forward to more informative meet ups with you guys!

    1 · June 9, 2013

  • l

    I learned about more plants than I could eat. That's a good day.

    2 · June 9, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    You guys did a grreat job!

    June 9, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    Good information. Presenter when too fast at the end, did not explain enough on how some particular plants are used. It is not enough to know the name and which part is edible. It's important to know how it must be prepared.

    June 9, 2013

  • Robin

    Great information! Seeing the different wild edibles in person is far better than just looking them up. Thanks Ed and Bryan for sharing ur knowledge!

    June 9, 2013

  • Brian

    Are you at the conewago day use area?

    June 9, 2013

    • Brian

      No go out to the ranger station and turn right go to Alpine Road turn right go 2 miles you will see the day use area on right look for a red Chevy Silverado

      June 9, 2013

    • Brian

      Wait there

      June 9, 2013

  • l

    With all due respect Kathy, it wouldn't be fair to the members who RSVP to an event, change their mind, and are courteous enough to change their RSVP so others can come. I would advise your friends daughter and husband to join the group. That way they can attend future events. Andrew. I've never met you and I've been to four events since joining in February. Brian has asked me to teach this one. And although my knowledge base is limited, I'd appreciate at least an introduction to whomever is making decisions that affect the members of this group. You feel me?

    1 · June 9, 2013

    • A former member
      A former member

      Ok thanks I will let them know

      June 9, 2013

    • A former member
      A former member

      Best wishes Ed. You will do great! Great leadership in you I have seen.

      3 · June 9, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    Oh how I wish I were attending. Gotta work tonight. Have fun, be safe, learn much! Bill

    June 9, 2013

  • l

    Oh...and your pot:)

    June 9, 2013

  • l

    Raymond, I'd really appreciate it if you could bring your stove, water, and fuel. Thank you sir.

    June 9, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    The 2 friends of mine that are comimg just called and said her Daughter and husband are up for a visit an would like to come along. Is this ok ? I know only one spot is left

    June 8, 2013

  • l

    Yeah, you can bring what ever type you want, I just want to be able to heat up some water to a boil but I need to be able to get enough for the whole group.

    May 28, 2013

    • A former member
      A former member

      Did you get what you needed as far as stoves? I could bring one and also a water buffalo of water and a pot.

      June 8, 2013

  • Erica

    Boo! Got an unexpected appointment tomorrow. Can't make it :( Hopefully there will be another wild edibles meetup soon?

    June 8, 2013

  • Steve

    Had an injury in my house a few days ago and I'm now playing nurse. Going to miss this one. Bummer!

    June 8, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    Sorry Brian! New plans.

    June 3, 2013

  • l

    As Matt pointed out to me this past weekend, bring bug/tick repellant. You may also want to bring a camera or cell phone with picture taking capabilities, a note pad, and pen. I don't know what the temp will be but either way bring something to drink, preferrably non caffeine if the weather is hot. And speaking of hot, I will be bringing my two burner cook stove to make a warm drink for those that want it. Does anyone else have a stove like this that they can bring to help get the water going?

    May 28, 2013

    • A former member
      A former member

      Maybe someone with a Stovetec may be able to bring one to the event?

      May 28, 2013

  • l

    Okay members. After looking at different sites on the net about edible plants, and finding out what it would cost me to have colored pictures printed out for 40 some people, I will be providing written information on the plants but the pictures themselves won't be happening. Sorry, I really wasn't expecting this much of a turn out. However, there's a plethora of sites with some excellent pictures on the net. And with 13 days left before the event, you could still buy a manual if you don't have one. I've seen second hand stores that have these manuals if you don't want to buy new. Sorry for the late notice.

    3 · May 27, 2013

    • A former member
      A former member

      Thanks so much, Ed, for taking the countless hours and personal resources to help us with learning very helpful skills! Have a good rest of the week.

      2 · May 28, 2013

  • l

    Hey Scott. Brian and I were discussing that recently and I told him I'd like to schedule some events this side of Lancaster since I live in Dover. With the amount of people we have in this group, we'll probably see events being duplicated for those that live west of Lancaster as well as those that live East of Lancaster. This might be a good way to do things since members that can't make one of the given events can attend the duplicate. I told Brian that I'm working diligently to increase my fire making knowledge...primitive fire making. In a given situation, fire will be a priority. I'm sure all of the members will agree. I plan to learn numerous ways to make fire without anything but natural materials, and I plan to teach it...a lot. So, I will coordinate with Brian to teach it in my area and his. When I first joined, there were I believe on 96 members. We now have 164. So depending on the subject taught, we'll have to have duplicate meetings out of necessity.

    2 · May 24, 2013

    • A former member
      A former member

      A lot of really nice areas up here in Perry Co. if you want to go rural my end of the county is the placce to be. Even the people in Perry co. ask why do you live so far out!

      May 24, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    I was REALLY looking forward to attending this event but a recent scheduling conflict came up. Maybe we'll be able to have more events at this location... I just moved to Dillsburg so it's rather close.

    1 · May 22, 2013

  • l

    I bought a few more books recently that Jennifer recommended, and I'm glad I did. One was the Petersons field guide, Edible Wild Plants. All I remembered of this manual when I last saw it two years ago or so, was that it didn't have any colored pictures. I was wrong. It does, although they aren't necessarily with the plant. But, this manual has some information that the others that I have, don't have. What I've learned from this is it's helpful to have a collection of manuals because what one doesn't have, another one may. The other ones I got are Tom Browns Field Guide, Wild Edible and Medicinal Plants, as well as his Wilderness Survival manual. In the edible and medicinal manual, there are no pictures and only a few drawings, but he does put a different perspective on things. His wilderness survival manual is damn nice. I've been using it in conjunction with other sources and have increased my survival skills over the past three weeks. Wait til the next fire course:)

    2 · May 21, 2013

  • l

    If anyone has any concerns about where to go, please send me an email.

    May 20, 2013

    • A former member
      A former member

      I will be relying on mapquest to get to 2200 Rosstown rd Lewisberry PA Is there anything else I need to know once I get to where ever that is? [masked]

      May 20, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    I have another to bring along but won't let me bring more than 2? It will be me, my husband and another couple. Is that a problem?

    May 20, 2013

    • Brian

      Sherri have the other couple sign up for the group its free to join and they can leave the group at anytime ...

      May 20, 2013

    • A former member
      A former member

      Ok, I let them know, Brian.

      1 · May 20, 2013

  • Rich

    It looks like my plans will be changing.

    May 20, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    To those who might decide at the last minute not to attend please let it be known so that those of us on the wait list can go....please!
    Thanks

    1 · May 19, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    I will be coming from Philadelphia to attend so please if anything changes please let me know.
    Once I get to park how will I know exactly where to go?

    May 19, 2013

  • l

    Okay folks, we're going to meet at the Conewago Day Use Area off of Alpine Road. Once you make your turn into the park, you'll go all the way to the end of that road. This becomes the huge parking area. I'll have a white sign made up with the letters SEPA on it. Bring a notepad if you need one, a camera if you want.

    May 18, 2013

  • Bobby S.

    This wild edibles thing could be important. Survival definitely depends on eating enough throughout the day. Preps only last so long, as does a garden. One must learn to prepare for the worst...

    3 · March 20, 2013

    • Steve

      Also 'gardening' doesn't need to stop because of seasons. Aeroponics, hydroponics, aquaponics, greenhouses, etc.

      1 · March 20, 2013

    • A former member
      A former member

      This is exactly the kind of thing I was looking for

      May 17, 2013

  • l

    I will send out that info in about three to four weeks Raymond. I need to go up to the park and take a looksee.

    April 2, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    Pinchot Park is huge, exactly what part of the park are we meeting at?

    April 1, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    Does anyone have The Encyclopedia of Edible Plants of North America: Nature's Green Feast by Francois Couplin? Based on the reviews on Amazon, it looks like a pretty comprehensive book but with few images. If anyone has it, is it worth having?

    March 27, 2013

  • Bobby S.

    I'm so uninformed about all this stuff that one session with the bushcrafters and my chances of survival are increased 1000%. This in itself is super cool. Edibles are a must. I saw a guy eating ants on a doomsday prepper show. He had balls to do it, but said that the ants didn't taste bad. The chick with him couldn't eat the ants. I guess I'd eat ants too if they were all that was around. However, if bushcraft identifies more vegan stuff to eat in the woods I'm all in. Hope that's the case in June.

    SAV

    March 27, 2013

    • Steve

      Diversity in your food sources are best because no one thing will keep you alive. Rabbits for example don't have the nutritional value to keep you alive, but if you supplement with edibles it can help with deficiencies. As that goes, edibles don't have the calories you need to keep you going by themselves. Also consider that by diversifying you don't use up a food source in one area.

      2 · March 27, 2013

    • A former member
      A former member

      Well so much for my steak, wings and beer survival plan...lol. on a serious note, I have been to three of these classes and I find myself grabbing greens from my front yard to add to salads.

      1 · March 27, 2013

  • l

    I received some books three days ago that Brian recommended for wild edible plants. The first one is Edible Wild Plants by Elias and Dykeman. It has a time of season for all the plants in the book, so you can see when the best time to harvest is, and it tells you the region for the plant, the habitat, and the edible uses. All the pictures are in color. The second book is Nature's Garden by Samuel Thayer. I think out of the three that I have, this is the best one. It's more insightful then the first book and the one by Angier, Edible Wild Plants. He also tells you when to harvest, the region for the plant, the habitat, and the edible uses. But the cool thing about this book is he gives you multiple colored pictures for all the plants. This makes it much easier to identify the plant, at least for me. Check them out on Amazon.com and see the inside of them if you want.

    2 · March 26, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    March 24, 2013

34 went

  • Brian +1
    Organizer,
    Event Host
  • l +2
  • Elizabeth K +1
    Assistant Organizer
  • Robin +1
  • A former member
  • A former member
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  • A former member
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    +2 guests
  • A former member
  • A former member
    +1 guest
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    +2 guests
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    +2 guests
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