Southern Arizona Preppers Message Board › Tip: never ending supply of green onions

Tip: never ending supply of green onions

Joe P.
Group_curmudgeon
Tucson, AZ
Post #: 144
When using green onions or scallions, you can insure yourself an endless supply. Did you know if you replant the white bulb of the green onion and scallion, they will send up new green shoots? If you have them in your garden harvest only the green stalks to use in cooking. In a few days the onions will start to send up new green leaves. The same can be done with store bought green onions. Just trim back the roots to about 1/4- 1/2 inch and trim the greens just above the white and put in a jar of water. In a week or two you will have enough new growth to work with, and just repeat the cycle. A pinch of sugar in the water will act as food and keep the plants going. Oh yeah, be sure to change the water every couple days or so.
Jennifer
user 20654681
Tucson, AZ
Post #: 158
Awesome tip! Thank you!
John M.
user 57348672
Tucson, AZ
Post #: 6
Love green onions. Gonna try it today. Thanks.
James
user 7981064
Tucson, AZ
Post #: 99
Great tip!
Sandra
user 10746910
Phoenix, AZ
Post #: 78
Excellent Tip!
Ronald Frederick G...
user 3921570
Tucson, AZ
Post #: 39
Beyond stems sprouting from root fragments, many plants can be “cloned”. The book "Plants from Test Tubes" provides detailed guidance for those who want to set up a scientific, yet home-scale cloning operation. The starting material can be meristems, shoot tips, macerated stem pieces, nodes, buds, flowers, peduncle (flower stalk), rhizone tips, root pieces, and in theory a single cell. The cited text is strongly recommended.
Many types of plants can be propagated by a cutting from a vegetative plant part. Take cuttings with a sharp knife to reduce injury to the parent plant. Clean the cutting in alcohol, peroxide, etc., to avoid transmitting diseases (you hope there are none). Looks for modes (bumps on the stem - see reference material for your particular choice of plants). At least one node must be in the rooting medium. Preferred is two up, two down.
Remove flowers and buds to allow the cutting to focus its stored carbohydrates on root and shoot formation rather than fruit or seed production. Rooting can be improved by application of a rooting hormone, with a fungicide if possible. If you do not have access to a commercial product hormone, consider cutting and mashing the growing tip of any other plant. A particular example of a homemade rooting hormone from the web.
1) Gather a handful of willow twigs. Fresh branches work best so avoid fallen and dead twigs. All varieties of willow contain indolebutyric acid which is the active ingredient needed in a rooting hormone. This acid acts to reduce the plant cuttings ability to stop growth at the place of the wound (where you cut the leaf or stem).
2) Cut the willow stems into pieces about two to four inches long. You will want about 1 cups of clippings to make one half gallon of rooting hormone.
3) In a large container pour boiling water over the clippings and allow the mixture to steep overnight.
4) Store the rooting hormone in the refrigerator in a sealed container. The mixture will be viable for up to two months.
Insert cuttings into a rooting medium like coarse sand, which is sterile, well drained, yet constantly moist. Find a way to keep the container sealed. Put stem and leaf cuttings in bright, indirect light. Put root cuttings in the dark until new shoots appear. Expect the process to take 4 to 6 weeks, or for the cuttings to rot.
Mist propagation involves suspending the cuttings, with as MUCH leaf as possible, in a mist chamber with relatively intense light, to the level of potential heat damage. The mist keeps the cells moist while providing the maximum drive for the leaves to produce food and hormones to prompt rooting.
Layering is a cloning method where stems that are still attached to the parent plant is encouraged to form roots where the stem touches a rooting medium. Expect this to have much greater success than cuttings.
"Air Layering" is just a matter of cutting wounds in a living stem, (generally a 1/2 to 3/4 inch branch, but larger works) and surrounding it with most airy mass, (say damp moss) surrounded by a semi-permeable membrane (saran) to encourage root growth. Once the moss has visible roots, cut the new plant free just below the roots, and plant.
Jennifer
user 20654681
Tucson, AZ
Post #: 242
I have tried 4 separate plantings and nothing. Could it be that they need to be organic Green Onions? I'm so frustrated. I will not be defeated by little green onion roots!
Ronald Frederick G...
user 3921570
Tucson, AZ
Post #: 49
I tend to plant the root end of nearly everything… Carrots, beets, radish, green / yellow / red onions… Not all come back, but many do, probably something like 10% overall as a guess. They are put in “potting soil” from Walmart, the soil being 2 to 3 inches deep in a foil tray, with an upside down bottle keeping a layer of water on the bottom.
Jennifer
user 20654681
Tucson, AZ
Post #: 244
Oh, thanks. 10% doesn't put me on too much of a guilt trip. I will try the potting soil instead of the vermiculite and compost/mulch.
Joe P.
Group_curmudgeon
Tucson, AZ
Post #: 175
Jennifer,

Try this. Cut down the green onion to about 1/2" from the white. Trim back the roots to about 1/2 inch. Then put them in a glass with water about a third of the way up the onion. Change the water every other day. It takes about a week. I have done this in the sun, on the kitchen counter with only indirect light. And there is no need for organic. I used green onions from regular grocery stores like Safeway.
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