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The Suncoast Linux Users Group Message Board › New, old, laptop.

New, old, laptop.

Corry
user 17190121
Riverview, FL
Post #: 6
Not big news to anyone else, likely, but I'm a little excited. I bought an old laptop from a friend for < $100 and just installed Ubuntu 12.04 LTS on it. Looking forward to finally getting my hands more into this. This wil be my development practice system, and my first time with a Linux desktop that I actually use.
Art E.
Art_Eaton
Pinellas Park, FL
Post #: 3
I myself have been restricted to Linux at a home desktop. At the office, I have always had to make all my gear available to other volunteers etc... and THEY need to use scanners, windows shares etc... that are not that easy (and sometimes impossible) for them to deal with on a new Ubuntu user account. My old HP only has a 50 gig drive, making dual boot scary. My new laptop, despite other wishes, has Win8 Pro. This also (sigh) makes dual boot impossible without serious jacking around. It also means that I have to continue to depend on the old machine; lots of drivers are STILL not available for Windblows 8. It seems to have most every problem that Linux desktops have. Go figure.
Sam L.
samuelelliot
Santa Ana, CA
Post #: 40
Corry, What did you get for under $1--?
I bought an old laptop from a friend for < $100 and just installed Ubuntu 12.04 LTS on it.
What are you planning on delving into?
Looking forward to finally getting my hands more into this.
What will you be running on it as far as a development environment?
This wil be my development practice system
What exactly is a development practice system, I assume it has something to do with this being your first time?
...my first time with a Linux desktop that I actually use.

Corry
user 17190121
Riverview, FL
Post #: 7
What I got:
It's an Acer that was built in 2006. It has a Pentium M 1.7ghz CPU, 120G HDD, 1G DDR, 802.11b/g wireless, DVD +-RW and Intel Graphics/ 15.4" LCD. It had Windows XP Media edition on it, and has an activation code sticker on it, so If I ever wanted to go back, I could probably find an install disk somewhere.

Delving:
I'm not exactly sure yet. I installed Ubuntu on a server at home, and then added the desktop to it. I don't remember the name of it but it starts with the command "startx". But, I really haven't used it much. Most of what I have done on it I did through the shell, sitting at my windows computer. I'm interested to how well I like Ubuntu as a desktop operating system. So far, it's not too bad. I can find what I need and do what I want.

Developing:
I'll be installing NetBeans and hooking up with github and doing some PHP programming. I'll probably be asking for some help over at the other Meetup.

Practice:
I work as a developer, but I use a windows system there, and I don't use any IDE. I am hoping that havng this laptop will encourage me to play as a devloper more, and in so doing, increase my marketable skillset. In addition, since the sites I work on are hosted on a linux system, the skills I pick up just using this computer should help me in those few instances where I have to change gears from Web Application Developer to Linux System Administrator.
Art E.
Art_Eaton
Pinellas Park, FL
Post #: 4
I too want to get my machines rigged out and start developing from a full open source platform. I understand the difficulties in transition. I have not had any trouble developing from Ubuntu (hey, you start netbeans and you are there), and grep and GIT don't actually require you to use command line anymore. I just miss the ability to use peripherals, and I miss some of my old favorite alternate editors like Winmerge and Crimson Editor. Netbeans is not as slick as it might be in some areas (like "save" ain't a button...).
XP Media edition isn't something you would want to go back to. For a windows environment, I will be depending on xppro for a while yet until some Samba and Cups issues start getting solved.
In any case, that old acer sounds like a good lightweight portable machine that will be perfect for on-the-go work. I bet Ubuntu runs far faster than the original OS. Unfortunately, the Unity desktop make simple chores like putting a share link ("launcher"?) a bit of a hit or miss for me. Sometimes I miss .bat files...
Sam L.
samuelelliot
Santa Ana, CA
Post #: 41
What "you" got
That sounds like a powerful enough system for developing with. I would just suggest tweaking the GUI, removing as many of the "niceties" to improve performance and response. Turn off all the unnecessary graphical charms, bells, and whistles you can, possibly even change the desktop back to Gnome. If you decide to do the latter, you'll want to do the previous modifications after logging into GNOME Classic.

  • Open the Ubuntu Software Center
  • Search for gnome shell
  • When you find GNOME Shell, click the Install button
  • After the install, logout out of Ubuntu
  • From the login screen choose GNOME Classic

IBM blog entry on Reverting to GNOME Classic
Now you have GNOME Classic, if you want to revert in the future Unity is still installed.

Delving
I know I've mentioned this before, but I just want to reiterate, installing a GUI on a server makes the server slower; remote management via SSH is the typical methodology, as you've done. The GUI you were using was called "X" hence the command "startx".

Developing
Net­Beans, though faster than most of the competing Java-based IDEs and providing as many if not more plugins, can be somewhat of a beast. Make sure to disable/remove as many of the non-essentials as possible. It may not consume a lot of memory, but during certain internal processes (ex: project scan) NetBeans can become significantly slower or temporarily non-responsive.

Practice
No IDE, what a cumbersome and trying process, but the experience can harden you instincts.
Sam L.
samuelelliot
Santa Ana, CA
Post #: 42
... I miss some of my old favorite alternate editors like Winmerge ...
Try using Meld, it should provide you with what your looking for.

Netbeans is not as slick as it might be in some areas (like "save" ain't a button...).
I'm not certain I know what you're referring to, but I have a save button on the toolbar in my NetBeans install. In fact I haven't seen a screenshot of NetBeans which doesn't have the save button there.

... Sometimes I miss .bat files...
Though technically different, shell scripts (.sh) fill that role on pretty much all non-Windows based operating systems; and are used heavily.
Corry
user 17190121
Riverview, FL
Post #: 8
... Sometimes I miss .bat files...

In my (limited) experience, shell scripts and bat files might as well be the same thing. I mean, if you were explaining to someone who had no idea what either was, you'd probably come up with some pretty similar wording. (A text file that contains commands for the operating system to perform.) Now, my experience with either is not exhaustive, but enough to see their similarities.
Art E.
Art_Eaton
Pinellas Park, FL
Post #: 5
Netbeans has a "save all" button, but you have to go to the file menu to hit "save" for one file only. You can't get a context menu (rclick) that gives you a save option, at least from what I have found so far. I am sure I could manage the toolbar items if I wanted to. I am less hopeful about the context menus, but hey, I haven't looked into it.
Sam L.
samuelelliot
Santa Ana, CA
Post #: 43
I prefer just using the standard (OS agnostic) key-combination Ctrl+S (or Cmd+S on Apple), much faster than switching from the keyboard to the mouse and back.

Netbeans has a "save all" button, but you have to go to the file menu to hit "save" for one file only.

If your looking to have a "Save" button on your toolbar in NetBeans, you can add it. To add "Save" to the toolbar follow the following steps.

  • Right-click on the toolbar to bring up the context menu (or goto View > Toolbars)
  • Choose Customize... this brings up the Customize Toolbars dialog box
  • Under the System section choose Save
  • Drag & Drop the icon onto the toolbar to your preferred location

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