Shaolin Australia Message Board › Injuries

Injuries

Dan W.
DanJohnWatson
Sydney, AU
Post #: 13
Afternoon all.

I'm not sure if anyone else has ever had this problem - but I find I'm impatient.

I'll be in training admiring the magnificent physiques or marveling at the flexibility of my contemporaries - and envy leads me to attempt something along the lines of effort.

So of course, imagining myself much fitter than I am, I'm out the door for a quick 10k run. Which leads to me falling over at about 2kms and spending the next two days walking like a Greek cabin boy.

Of course then I turn to flexibility - and hold stretches I shouldn't really be doing (i.e. pain, not just an intense stretch) which leads to several days of complaining that my poor wife could probably do without.

Of course, if I run two meters, or don't stretch at all, I'll remain the poor slovenly eastern suburbs lady-boy I am forever

Sometimes I'm prone to under-do... no real need of a solution here... but as right now I'm prone to overdo - below is the jow that I buy (on the advice of one of the SOS's, I believe on the advice from Serge) which seems to help with sore muscles, joints and even fists after I've been punching a wall for a while.





Do any of the other SOS's have any other tips for avoiding/fixing injuries as they occur?

http://en.wikipedia.o...­



Terry
user 9312439
Sydney, AU
Post #: 66
I note in the Wikipedia link that the Dit Da Jow contains cooling herbs and warming herbs for different purposes.

Not having any training in chemistry, pharmacology, herbalism etc - can someone explain to an ignorant layman like me how these do not cancel each other out?
Martyn
user 10536907
Katoomba-Wentworth Falls, AU
Post #: 29
An obvious but useful suggestion is the old Epsom Salts (Magnesium sulfate). I find it very effective, but you need to use about a kilo in a hot bath. To be this excessive you need to buy it in bulk from a chemical supply company, it should be less the a dollar per kg. It is alleged to have many benefits. We also use it on the plants to correct magnesium deficiency. It will correct (and perhaps over correct?) a deficiency in you, as magnesium is most easily absorbed topically.

Please note I have no medical expertise, and will not be responsible for anyone becoming chronically dehydrated from this treatment.


Martyn
user 10536907
Katoomba-Wentworth Falls, AU
Post #: 30
I remembered that I have a copy of this book. Secret Shaolin formulas for the treatment of external injury
chapters one through ten of Shao Lin Si mi fang ji jin : highlights of Shaolin monastery's secret prescriptions




It can be half read on google books here

The preface says "The original text was orally transmitted by the 31st Patriarch of the Shaolin Monastery, the Abbot De Chan, to the monk (Dr) De Qian (b.1907)."

I have never made anything from it but is very interesting none the less. I found it at China Books in the discount bin. It contains, Emergency, Stop bleeding, Trauma Formulas, Medicinal Wines, Herbal Plasters ect.

I have no idea if it is any good?



Dan W.
DanJohnWatson
Sydney, AU
Post #: 14
Looks interesting - pipe tobacco to stop bleeding :)
Adam G.
user 10360630
Sydney, AU
Post #: 5
Interesting - when I read your post Dan, I just wanted to say take it easy, find a balance and look at the envy and impatience that’s causing the injuries, rather than looking for liquids, creams or salts that provide symptom relief.

Over the years, though I too have overdone, overstretched, over pushed muscles to the point of injuries and re-injuries. So, your message speaks to me quite loudly……Lots of emotions and related mental states have also come up for me to look at. Before injuring, there has usually been some kind of disturbing emotion and lack of balance. Then following injuries, there has usually been some of what I call anger and frustration at not being able to continue what my ego-self wanted to be doing and so on.

So, I’ve started to ask myself a couple of things. One is what is the gift or lesson I can learn from each injury? Two is how can I bring more awareness or change into my practice so as not to keep reinjuring?

My practice has changed and continues to change from day to day. I think there’s something about starting to recognize what is appropriate to your/our energy on the day……..And then if the energy calls for a strong training session, then that’s what builds or develops, perhaps after some warm ups. And if the energy calls for some kind of restful practice or even a sit down or a lay down, then that is also allowed…….

It’s an interesting journey………
Dan W.
DanJohnWatson
Sydney, AU
Post #: 15
Good wisdom Adam.

I've noticed as well that despite being frustrating, injuries also teach me something... firstly that I should have taken it easier and not been as greedy.

Secondly when I'm sore or injured I find having a different 'feel' to a muscle helps to give a different point of reference when I'm checking out 'how things are' - which can be useful.

Cheers

Dan
James A.
userJames
Sydney, AU
Post #: 3
In China they also often use 红花油 Hong Hua You (Red Flower Oil). I found it to be really effective when recovering from various aches and pains. To be applied in moderation though. Here's a pic:


Terry
user 9312439
Sydney, AU
Post #: 1,139
An interesting blog i came across today:
Physiotherapy: The Child of Massage Therapy
. . . . . . . . . . . .

In 1939 the Australian Massage Association was re-named the Australian Physiotherapy Association. There were many reasons for this name change in the context of Australian health care; distasteful connotations associated with the name ‘massage’ and the fact that the teaching of massage therapy had already been part of the University system for over thirty years in Australia and they wanted to rebrand the profession.

The real heroine for both massage and physiotherapy in Australia was Eliza McCauley, a doctor’s daughter who took an anatomy course at MelbourneUniversity in 1890 after being convinced that massage had therapeutic benefits. Her work came close on the heels of Per Henrik Ling, the father of [modern] Western massage and the inventor of "swedish" massage.

The discipline of physiotherapy, up to the 1960’s was never very far away from the techniques of massage. The skills that the Universities identified as essential to applying physiotherapy to patients in Australia had been gradually drawn away from honouring the human somatosensory system and linked to strict biomechanical, reductionist medicine.

But paradigms can get blurred. This new millennium has seen a quantum shift in health care. The road to wellness in the West now has many vehicles on the healing highway and I have seen several paths in Australia, Asia and in my many workshops overseas.

This article outlines how physiotherapists are revisiting and relearning the techniques that the great Eliza McCauley advocated so long ago. It seems to me that the therapeutic model used by early physiotherapists is now of some interest to the modern practitioner.

My workshops around New Zealand, Austria and Norway over the past two years have attracted many physiotherapists who have been eager to learn a range of new techniques such as manual vibration and remedial techniques using thermal stones to complement their physiotherapy practices. They are not new techniques but many have been lost to the physiotherapeutic field due to machinery replacing skilled human touch.

Perhaps my four years or study, research and dissection at UNSW on the Iliopsoas made me of special interest to them but it is rewarding to share insights between two therapeutic disciplines that share the same mother. There are a few lessons to be learnt from these workshop encounters;

  • Physiotherapists have gone much further into scientific proof through robust research for their belief in ‘what works.’ Their therapeutic truth is built on a well-worn process of assessment, treatment and outcome based, biomechanical results, but they are finding that a number of their patients are dissatisfied.
  • Patients who are in pain need to be touched. Distress is symptomatic of pain and a biomechanical approach to healing does not honour the somatosensory path to healing. Massage therapists and others who employ educated touch know that the style of touch that does not elicit pain is a powerful way to facilitate healing. Sometimes I think that European physios are more receptive to this idea as they still do use palpation to a greater extent than Australian counterparts.
  • Palpatory literacy is a skill that excites both physiotherapists and massage therapists and presentation of our skills through educated palpation combined with sound, anatomical knowledge is the language of engagement between our two professions.
  • Palpatory literacy is a skill that excites both physiotherapists and massage therapists and presentation of our skills through educated palpation combined with sound, anatomical knowledge is the language of engagement between our two professions.
  • The massage therapist who has limited anatomical knowledge relies way too heavily on metaphysics to successfully explain what they do; this language is foreign to the physiotherapist. In response, the physiotherapist who considers machinery or deep, painful palpation as ways to heal are relying mostly on placebo for success; brutality and touch are opposite healing forces for the massage therapist.
    ]*]The massage therapist who has limited anatomical knowledge relies way too heavily on metaphysics to successfully explain what they do; this language is foreign to the physiotherapist. In response, the physiotherapist who considers machinery or deep, painful palpation as ways to heal are relying mostly on placebo for success; brutality and touch are opposite healing forces for the massage therapist.


The lessons learnt across the globe while teaching physiotherapists, sometimes in the University setting, indicates to me that a profession never strays too far from their mother for too long. Eliza McCauley's passion for massage therapy initiated the profession of physiotherapy in Australia and her therapeutic soul still exists in every physiotherapist. Care is common between us.

There is a role, a very strong role, for palpatory literacy in therapeutic practice, whether it be physiotherapy or massage therapy. A massage therapist will gain respect from physiotherapists if they are able to communicate intelligently with them in their own language; functional anatomy. A physiotherapist envies the skills, art and freedom a massage therapists has in their experienced hands. A well know physiotherapist, my client for several years, once said to me, ‘I want your hands!’ I replied to her, ‘I want your (anatomical) knowledge.’ When I am at UNSW, in the dissection room, I sometimes wonder if she ever completed a massage course to learn what Eliza knew.

Greg Morling M.Ed. DRM, Wat Bo practitioner, Dip QA
Greg has been Head of Massage for ATMS and President of the AAMT. He is a world expert on the Iliopsoas and lectures mainly in Europe to to a broad range of therapists.

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