The Boulder Lisp Users Group Message Board › Next Lisp meeup is a week from tomorrow (Oct. 15th)

Next Lisp meeup is a week from tomorrow (Oct. 15th)

Martin M.
martinmuggli
Group Organizer
Lafayette, CO
Hi there,

Something happened with the last meetup I scheduled such that some folks were only alerted a day before. I'm just sending this out to make sure everyone has a bit more advanced notice.

I'm thinking the 3rd Thursday of the month would be a good regular meeting date. If anyone has a regular conflict with this, we can try to find a better date.

I think it would be cool if people could give presentations on various topics. I'd like to do one on approaches to continuations in Common Lisp at some point for example. We can talk more at the meetup.

Martin
Mark M.
mmiller
Boulder, CO
Post #: 2
I wanted to add a little clarification to Martin's note. We're meeting in a back room of "The Cup". That's where we met in September. I didn't even know they had a back room. You come through the front entrance, go all the way past the counter where you can order stuff, go down the hallway, which is just straight ahead of you, and you'll come upon a room on your right that has some tables. That's our meeting spot. Poor Martin said that this is where he was for our meeting in July, sitting by himself thinking that no one had shown up! (a few of us were sitting at the front table of the restaurant having a great time. :) ) Just a thought, but at future meetings we should probably let the people at the counter know that we're back there, in case anyone asks.
Mark M.
mmiller
Boulder, CO
Post #: 3
If anyone's interested, I just saw this yesterday. Alan Kay made another book recommendation (it was from this discussion):

"Besides SICP, another book in the same vein that I like a lot is 'Essentials of Programming Languages' by Friedman and Wand. I’d call this a 'real computer science' textbook."

This book is co-written by Daniel P. Friedman, the author of "The Little Schemer".

A frequent topic of discussion that Kay gets involved in is asserting that what's taught now as CS is not a real science, and then pondering the question, "What would CS be like if it was a real science?" So when he says a "real computer science" textbook he's talking about it in this vein.

I looked it up on Amazon, and the description says that it delves deep into the structural elements of programming languages by having students construct language interpreters. I believe it said somewhere that it uses the Scheme language.

One of the reviewers said that the 2nd Edition is better, as the more recent one is watered down.

I'm not suggesting at all that we divert from the idea of using SICP. Just making a note here about another good book for future reference.
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