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The Sickness Unto Death

This text is a psychological exposition of the difficulties in consciously being a "self," in wanting to develop and preserve one's personal identity. Kierkegaard considers the problems which arise, respectively, from being unaware of, denying, and desiring fully self-conscious existence in the face of one's mutability and mortality.  He is addressing what many take to be the fundamental problem of the human condition.

I'd like us to have read the text before meeting, though the format of the discussion will follow the major themes in the text in the order in which they were written. 

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  • Poe

    I was watching Ingmar Bergman's 'Persona' and it reminded of this book! Elizabeth turns mute and is happy in the company of her nurse (seemingly reunited with her soul), until the two begin to distance themselves from each other & Elizabeth falls back into despair. This is probably but a footnote in the broader narrative, but it was a fun thought. It's a wonderful movie, so I wont ruin it entirely.

    1 · July 7, 2014

  • Tom

    I enjoyed the group; everyone seemed engaged and had great insights to offer. I feel like I understand Kierkegaard better than when I arrived. Thanks.

    2 · July 6, 2014

  • Imran M.

    We'll be in the right Cafe side, upstairs in the couch room

    July 6, 2014

  • Imran M.

    “There is so much talk about human distress and wretchedness—I try to understand it and have also had some intimate acquaintance with it—there is so much talk about wasting a life, but only that person’s life was wasted who went on living so deceived by life’s joys or its sorrows that he never became decisively and eternally conscious as spirit, as self, or, what amounts to the same thing, never became aware and in the deepest sense never gained the impression that there is a God and that “he,” he himself, his self, exists before this God—an infinite benefaction that is never gained except through despair.”

    Excerpt From: Kierkegaard, Søren. “The Sickness Unto Death.” Princeton University Press, 1980. iBooks.

    July 6, 2014

  • Brian

    The Dreyfus courses are helpful. Free online

    July 3, 2014

5 went

  • Imran M.
    Co-Organizer
    Event Host
  • Poe
  • Tom
  • A former member
  • A former member

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