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The North Texas Aquaponics Meetup Group Message Board › Reputable Fish Source

Reputable Fish Source

Melissa F.
user 81968202
Richardson, TX
Post #: 1
I read the existing threads about fish, specifically tilapia. They are a little old, so I was wondering if new information is available. I would like to do some nile tilapia (probably white). I am aware that TPWD requires a license for all but the Mozambique variety. If anyone knows the requirements/costs of the license and a good source for the fish (breeding pair etc.) I would really appreciate it.

Thanks for any input in advance.

Melissa Fink
Adam
user 11075995
Santa Fe, NM
Post #: 44
Hi Melissa -- if you really want to raise a variety of Tilapia other than Mozambique, you will need to contact Luci Cook (Luci.Cook-hildreth@tpwd.state.tx.us) at TPWD for all the specifics relating to permiting and paperwork relating to Exotic Species. Parks and Wildlife has recently (last two years) gone through a rather large reorganization of staff and subsequently things are now being done very differently than they were a few years ago. I believe that the permit has an application cost of roughly $200, and an annual cost of $50.
In addition, you may be required to gain other permits (wastewater treatment or possibly the aquaculture certification), as I said the process has changed a great deal in the last two years.

As far as getting quality fish -- I would recommend Kellen up at White Brook Tilapia Farm (www.tilapiasource.com). He has the best fish that I know of and reasonable prices. He has many varieties that he stocks and can help you get the best ones for your purpose.

If you have any more questions, please feel free to contact me and I will do what I can to help.

Adam
Bob J.
user 18667641
Garland, TX
Post #: 52
http://diyaquaponics....­
That is only for the aquaculture license
You then have to deal with these guys and they think of them as an invasive species .

If you will be culturing species that are not native to Texas, contact Texas Parks & Wildlife Department at (512) 389-8037 for exotic species permit requirements
Bob J.
user 18667641
Garland, TX
Post #: 53
For additional information please refer to our rules regarding Harmful or Potentially Harmful Exotic Fish, Shellfish and Aquatic Plants. You can access them at the Texas Administrative Code, Title 31, Part 2, Chapter 57, Subchapter A.

Texas Administrative Code, Title 31, Part 2, Chapter 57, Subchapter A.
http://www.tpwd.state...­
http://info.sos.state...­
Melissa F.
user 81968202
Richardson, TX
Post #: 2
Thank you all for the very helpful information. After posting this, I did run across White Brook and had decided to go with them from another aquaponics site recommendation. I also continued reading and will probably stick with the mozambique strain to avoid conflict with what is acceptable in Texas. After I am more established, I may pursue the other, but the additional steps and expense aren't my main focus right now.
Adam
user 11075995
Santa Fe, NM
Post #: 45
Melissa - if you want something that will be more productive that your garden variety Mossie, I would highly recommend you get the Hawaiian Golds that Kellen offers. They are a pure-bred Mozambique strain that has been selected for color and for growth rate. From what I hear, they are not that far behind some of the Nile hybrids in that respect.

If you just want plain Mossies, I have some here in the DFW area that I am willing to part with. Just let me know.
Heather
user 84000242
Dallas, TX
Post #: 2
I'm just starting to set up a small aquaponics system, and I'm looking for fish. Are tilapia easy fish to start with? From what I've read so far, I like the idea of getting tilapia. Is the best way to buy them to order them online? How many fish would I want to start with in a 50 gallon tank?
Bob J.
user 18667641
Garland, TX
Post #: 55
Fish, Biology, and Plants make up the system balance. Growbeds are the biological filter and where the good bacteria live. You want fish volume based on the amount of grow bed area and amount of plant volume. Ex: 1 lb of fish for 10 lbs of plant mass is a fair ratio, assuming you have a growbed saw about 20 gallon size of so. There are lots of formulas. What seems to work best is keeping the fish volume low and the growbed and plant volume larger.

I'd recommend Goldfish of give a home to displaced Koi
Pat C.
PatChesney
Waco, TX
Post #: 7
I have raised tilapia, bluegill and gold fish. All do well. Bluegill grow slower. Both bluegill and goldfish can survive without heating the water. Mozambique tilapia do not. That is why Texas lets you have those. I have raised the Hawaiian Gold from White Brook. They did grow very well. Since I am striving for self-sufficient, solar greenhouses, I am moving to bluegill and carp (I hope).

I have a breeding pair of Common Carp in my farm pond and we haven't looked to see if the stock has taken hold or not. Carp are actually wonderful eating (ask a European-not an American) I was shocked at how good they are. (Don't eat the red flesh or you will think I am crazy.) Only eat the white flesh. Carp are the #1 aquaponic fish in the world. Koi are just expensive, fancy carp. "Koi" means "carp" in Japanese.

Once you try fried Cajun Carp balls, you will wonder why you haven't been eating carp before this.

Oh, I forgot catfish. They are very good too. If you eat non-kosher fish, then they grow well in our climate also. Carp are kosher.
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