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August 15, 2010 - 25 went

Wild Food Walk and Water Procurement

Water Procurement from tree (willow)

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Added by Pascal B.
on Aug 15, 2010.
 

Comments

  • christopher m.

    Be sure to use nontoxic plants as the resulting fluid is more of a "tea" than water. Eucalyptus and Willow are the best for CA. Environmental factors that affect the rate of transpiration: 1. Light Plants transpire more rapidly in the light than in the dark. This is largely because light stimulates the opening of the stomata (mechanism). Light also speeds up transpiration by warming the leaf. Put transpiration bag on the sunny side of the tree. A clear bag lets in the most light. 2. Temperature Plants transpire more rapidly at higher temperatures because water evaporates more rapidly as the temperature rises. At 30°C, a leaf may transpire three times as fast as it does at 20°C. 3. Humidity The rate of diffusion of any substance increases as the difference in concentration of the substances in the two regions increases.When the surrounding air is dry, diffusion of water out of the leaf goes on more rapidly. Rotate bags on branches daily to prevent them from being "burned" or "asphixiated". 4. Wind When there is no breeze, the air surrounding a leaf becomes increasingly humid thus reducing the rate of transpiration. When a breeze is present, the humid air is carried away and replaced by drier air. 5. Soil water A plant cannot continue to transpire rapidly if its water loss is not made up by replacement from the soil. When absorption of water by the roots fails to keep up with the rate of transpiration, loss of turgor occurs, and the stomata close. This immediately reduces the rate of transpiration (as well as of photosynthesis). If the loss of turgor extends to the rest of the leaf and stem, the plant wilts. Plants in dry creek beds are likely to have year-round access to groundwater. This is one reason why willow is an excellent choice for transpiration.

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