The Philadelphia Vegetarian Social Club Message Board › Do Vegetarians and Vegans think they're better than everyone else?

Do Vegetarians and Vegans think they're better than everyone else?

Himanshu
aggieliberal
Group Organizer
Philadelphia, PA
Post #: 30
An interesting blog entry on NPR this morning, to get everyone thinking.

http://www.npr.org/bl...­

My question is this: If you think vegetarian or vegan lifestyle is better, why not just live by example and let others come and ask you questions and learn more about it, rather than going out there to proselytize? I can tell you this: every time some religious guy (of any religion) tries to proselytize me to their particular brand of religion, I'm generally offended and tend to take a negative view of that religion. That's what aggressive conversion tactics do to me, at least. So I say, I'm fine with my dietary choice and am happy to explain it to anyone but I'm not going to say I'm better than a meat-eater. But that's just me, perhaps. :)

I'd welcome a discussion.

If people are interested, we could even do a Sunday morning meetup discussion in a coffee shop and make such philosophical discussions.

If anyone knows an author or speaker who wants to lead such discussions, let me know and I can work on arranging a meetup event.
Gina R.
user 13601043
Philadelphia, PA
Post #: 4
i'd be open to a group discussion. and to answer the question, no, i don't think i am better than anyone else. i'm proud of my choice to be vegan because it's extremely beneficial to animals AND humans. i believe strongly in leading by example in all aspects of my life---so much so that if i am at a street corner and a child is nearby, i never cross on a red light because i don't want the kid to think it's ok. as for vegetarianism and veganism, it's important that we talk to others about it because the animals can't speak for themselves. if millions of animals were not suffering and dying needlessly every year, i'd be whistling a different tune on this, but right now, as i type, animals are chained up, cramped in small crates, confined to cages, bleeding, terrified, overheated, you name it. if one doesn't want to look at the ethical reasons to not eat meat, and instead wishes to focus on the health benefits and the environmental benefits, well, we can't keep silent there either--not while whole segments of our population have diabetes, not while water is polluted with runoff from factory farms, etc etc. keep in mind that aggressive protesters and sales people turn me off every time. however, there are ways to inform the public without turning them off, through education on the streets, peaceful protest, tabling at festivals, etc. i think that if anyone thinks they are better than everyone else, it's fundamentalist religious people, which is ironic because their religions are supposed to encourage tolerance, acceptance, and good works based on humility.
Beaumont
user 12650117
Philadelphia, PA
Post #: 14
Yes, I think we are better because we don't kill animals to eat them. I don't see any justification for eating animals if we can eat something else and stay healthy. I don't share my beliefs unless asked. I do always think when I'm going past Jim's Steaks on South Street, all those people standing inline to eat dead animals. Ugh.
Himanshu
aggieliberal
Group Organizer
Philadelphia, PA
Post #: 31
Gina, fantastic reply!

I know I clearly state in the group intro that I'm not wanting this group to be an advocacy platform, which is why I'm staying away from organizing pamphleteering or tabling at events, but it would be fun to have regular and thought-providing discussions on such topics. And if some group members then want to organize and take some action, that could be a way to go?

I was really hoping to find a vegan or vegetarian soup kitchen in Philly area that we could help by organizing events to volunteer for them.

If anyone knows of such a thing in Philly, do let me know and we could look into it further and organize some volunteering event.

Gina R.
user 13601043
Philadelphia, PA
Post #: 5
Hi. Food Not Bombs is similar to a soup kitchen and serves vegan food in a few spots in the city, including west Philly (on Wednesdays). I am open to volunteering for them.
Himanshu
aggieliberal
Group Organizer
Philadelphia, PA
Post #: 32
Awesome! I'll look into the details.
Sharon R.
sfwelfair
Philadelphia, PA
Post #: 26
I don't think I'm better than everyone else, but I really believe that a vegetarian/vegan diet is a much better diet for good health, the environment and the animals!!
This topic is especially timely because of the latest horrible undercover video to emerge, showing cows being handled in a brutal, violent way.
I think this would get some people motivated to adopt a more humane diet, especially the folks that profess a great love of animals..
The only rational way to help the situation would be to change eating habits and adopt a cruelty-free diet to eliminate or cut down on the use of animals in the food and clothing industry..
Yes, I'd be willing to volunteer with Food Not Bombs.. It's a great idea, I think. It's a double win situation; they feed the homeless vegan food, which involves a lot of chopping & cutting vegetables! I think they feed at a few different locations on different days of the week..
A former member
Post #: 8
I don't think vegetarians and vegans CAN be better than everyone else; everyone has a violation against society that they need to atone for--if it's not eating animals, it's gossiping or lying about a neighbor...if it's not lying, it's cheating on our spouse, or failing to return that extra change we got from the cashier...or it's looking down on others, as if the spirit of the Universe doesn't shine through them as well. I don't think it's healthy to separate eating animals from all the ways we add negative karma to the Universe...which means NO, we're not at ALL better, just different, in the same way that everyone is different--unique, anyway.
Amanda M
user 58221652
Philadelphia, PA
Post #: 1
I don't think I am better than those who eat meat, but there are definitely other vegans/vegetarians out there that do act like they are better and that really bothers me. I feel like everyone has their own passion or mission in life and that we shouldn't judge others or look down on them just because they do not share the same passions as we do. I know a lot of good people who are passionate about a lot of issues related to people, but they just happen to eat meat and vegetarianism is not what they focus on.

Saying that, I do still find it hard sometimes not to want to tell people I am close with about the treatment of the animals they eat, though I agree with Himanshu that if I was on the recieving end of someone proselytizing, I would be more irritated than interested in what they have to say. It is especially hard for me to deal with the fact that many of my family and friends just DO NOT CARE about what they eat. For example, I recently had a friend order Foia Gra (not sure how it is spelled?) in front of me. I got really upset and tried to explain to him what it was and what happened to the animals, but he was not phased by it. When I asked him why he ordered it he just said he heard it was illegal in some states and wanted to try it before it was illegal everywhere. I am still dissapointed/upset at him, but am trying to realize that he is just someone who will not worry about those sorts of things and that I should not try and convince him not to eat what he does because it will only cause problems in our friendship.
Himanshu
aggieliberal
Group Organizer
Philadelphia, PA
Post #: 33
Amanda, I agree: people tend to usher in lasting change in themselves only of their own volition. You have to accept your friend for who he is otherwise it will cause problems in your friendship. You can tell him more about vegan or vegetarian options if he is receptive and that could help him wean away from meat, just gaining that knowledge and if he is open-minded to give it a shot. If he's not, and you preach him all the positives about switching diets, he might just stop being receptive to anything further and then he's just become a lost cause...and worse, your friendship might take a hit. In my life, friends and family have made positive (and negative) impressions on me, and for what it's worth, those experiences put together is what I am. Those acquaintances that don't accept me for my vegetarianism (or anything else...race, faith or lack there of, ethnicity, etc.) don't end up being very close to me, for better or worse... so they don't mold my future. Those that are loving and appreciative of my differences end up teaching me some valuable lesson and hopefully I make positive change in their life too.
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