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'Blindness'­ by Jose Saramago

A driver waiting at the traffic lights goes blind. An opthamologist tries to diagnose his distinctive white blindness, but is affected before he can read the textbooks. It becomes a contagion, spreading throughout the city. Trying to stem the epidemic, the authorities herd the afflicted into a mental asylum where the wards are terrorised by blind thugs. And when fire destroys the asylum, the inmates burst forth and the last links with a supposedly civilised society are snapped.

No food, no water, no government, no obligation, no order. This is not anarchy, this is blindness.


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  • Joseph S.

    This was best summed up as "bleak" by pretty much everyone! But it was so uncomfortable reading it that I won't forget it for a while. Which makes it an awesome book!

    January 18, 2014

  • Ray O.

    Hi guys, it was nice to meet everyone last night. Im sorry I didn't introduce myself, as in why I like post apocalyptic fiction more: I am attracted to this kind of fictional work because I believe it speaks more to today's situations as opposed to novels contained within a present/past "known" time-frame. This is of course when a post-apocalyptic world merges with sci-fi outlook. I think this kind of fiction leads us to ask more questions about our present day as it acts as a reflective mirror to know that the power to prevent or perpetuate such outcomes lie in our hands. So in a way it is empowering from an egotistical point of view to read such material for as they say each latest generation believes it to be the last. I enjoyed last night's topic, and feel encouraged to read the book again, warts and all. I think some viewpoints i.e. the Marxist dialectic and the reading as seeing, and feeling the blindness has re-energized my approach towards this book. Peace out folks.

    3 · January 15, 2014

  • Daniel

    Hi everyone, this is the Spanish post apocalyptic film about an agoraphobia epidemic I talked to you about in the last meeting:
    http://variety.com/2013/film/reviews/hold-film-review-the-last-days-1200407509/
    (for fans of post apocalyptic films only)


    And the trailer:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iorFqRXiZA0
    (the only one quote that you hear is "¿Qué ha sido eso?" that means "What has that been?" :-)

    1 · January 14, 2014

  • Ray O.

    Hi guys, I have a copy of the book. I haven't been to one of these meetups before and was wondering where would I find you guys at the bar

    January 14, 2014

    • Rachel H.

      Hi Ray, we'll be the little room with the fire behind the bar. I have the book with me so look out for that.

      January 14, 2014

  • Rachel H.

    Hi Everyone l, im in the second room behind the bar at the Britons Protection. I need some troops to help me keep the little area ive secured. Grab a drink when you arrive and come and find me x

    January 14, 2014

  • A former member
    A former member

    Hi, thankyou! :)

    December 29, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    Hi folks. Nice to meet you!

    December 29, 2013

    • Rachel H.

      Hi Dom, welcome to the group :)

      December 29, 2013

  • Emily B.

    Big thumbs up for this one! Will have to get re-reading over Christmas :)

    1 · December 7, 2013

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