The San Diego Philosophers' Roundtable Message Board › Suggestions for future meeting discussion or debate topics.

Suggestions for future meeting discussion or debate topics.

A former member
Post #: 24
Probable Reasoning

"in reasoning from causation, and concerning matters of fact, ... absolute necessity cannot take place, and the imagination is free to conceive both sides of the question [e.g., the Sun will rise tomorrow]... Wherein consists the difference betwixt incredulity and belief?..."

David Hume, A Treatise Of Human Nature, Book I, Part III, Section VII

"Thus all probable reasoning is nothing but a species of sensation. 'Tis not solely in poetry and music, we must follow our taste and sentiment, but likewise in philosophy. When I am convinced of any principle, 'tis only an idea, which strikes more strongly upon me. When I give preference to one set of arguments above another, I do nothing but decide from my feeling concerning the superiority of their influence. Objects have no discoverable connection together; nor is it from any other principle but custom operating upon the imagination, that we draw any inference from the appearance of one to the existence of another."

David Hume, A Treatise Of Human Nature, Book I, Part III, Section VIII
A former member
Post #: 25
Partial Affection

"In vain shou'd we expect to find... a remedy... or hope for any [natural] principle of the human mind, which might controul those partial affections [selfishness] and make us overcome the temptations arising from our circumstances... Now it appears, that in the original frame of our mind, our strongest attention is confin'd to ourselves; our next is extended to our relations and acquaintance; and 'tis only the weakest which reaches to strangers and indifferent persons. This partiality, then, and unequal affection, must not only have an influence on our behaviour and conduct in society, but even on our ideas of vice and virtue; so as to make us regard any remarkable transgression of such a degree of partiality, either by too great an enlargement, or contraction of the affections, as vicious or immoral. This we may observe in our common judgments concerning actions, where we blame a person, who either centers all his affections in his family, or is so regardless of them, as, in any opposition of interest, to give the preference to a stranger, or mere acquaintance. From all which it follows, that our natural uncultivated ideas of morality, instead of providing a remedy for the partiality of our affections, do rather conform themselves to that partiality, and give it an additional force and influence."

- David Hume, A Treatise Of Human Nature, Book III, Part II, Section II.
A former member
Post #: 26
Objective Reality

"... the more necessity any knowledge carries with it, the more there is in it of what cannot possibly be otherwise thought or represented in perception - as, for example, space relations; hence the clearer and more satisfying it is, the less is its purely objective content, or the less reality, properly so called, is given in it. And conversely, the more there is in it that must be conceived as purely accidental, the more it impresses us as given only empirically, then the more that is properly objective and truly real is there in such knowledge, and also at the same time the more that is inexplicable, in other words, the more that cannot be derived from anything else."

Schopenhauer, The World As Will and Representation, Vol. I, Book II, Section 24.
A former member
Post #: 29
Narcissism

"Large quantities of libido... are in this way drawn into the formation of the narcissistic ego-ideal and find outlet and gratification in maintaining it. The institution of conscience was at bottom an embodiment first of parental criticism, and subsequently of that of society; a similar process takes place when a tendency towards repression develops out of a command or prohibition imposed in the first instance from without. But the revolt... springs from the person's desire to liberate himself from all these influences... His conscience then encounters him in a regressive form as a hostile influence from without.

The lament... shows that at bottom the self-criticism of conscience is identical with, and based upon, self-observation. The activity of the mind which took over the function of conscience has also enlisted itself in the service of introspection, which furnishes philosophy with the material for its intellectual operations. This must have something to do with the characteristic tendency... to form speculative systems."

Freud, On Narcissism, III
A former member
Post #: 30
Good

Those who resolve the sense of morals into original instincts of the human mind, may defend the cause of virtue with sufficient authority; but want the advantage, which those possess, who account for that sense by an extensive sympathy [and compassion] with mankind. According to the latter system, not only virtue must be approv'd of, but also the sense of virtue: And not only the sense, but also the principles, from whence it is deriv'd. So that nothing is presented on any side, but what is laudable and good.

Hume, A Treatise Of Human Nature, Book III, Part III, Section VI
A former member
Post #: 32
Utility

"Of two pleasures, if there be one to which all or almost all who have experience of both give a decided preference, that is the more desirable pleasure... Now it is an unquestionable fact that those who are equally acquainted with, and equally capable of appreciating and enjoying, both, do give a most marked preference to the manner of existence which employs our higher faculties. Few human creatures would consent to be changed into any of the lower animals, for a promise of the fullest allowance of a beast's pleasures; no intelligent human being would consent to be a fool, no instructed person would be an ignoramus, no person of feeling and conscience would be selfish and base, even though they should be persuaded that the fool, the dunce, or the rascal is better satisfied with his lot than they are with theirs."

John Stuart Mill, Utilitarianism, II

Tim
Ctrl_F4
San Diego, CA
Post #: 26
What constitutes sufficient evidence for inductive reasoning?
A former member
Post #: 35
I think we've talked about this implicitly over time but a more thorough look at the Problem of Universals would be a good discussion.
Tim
Ctrl_F4
San Diego, CA
Post #: 31
What is romantic love? Is such love a compromise of ideals (e.g. most romantic interests are not the "perfect lover")?
Tim
Ctrl_F4
San Diego, CA
Post #: 32
Why should we not steal/murder/cheat if we can get away with it? To avoid social persecution? That would beg further questions (e.g. What compels people to persecute; is it conformity, tribalism, etc.?). As social animals, are we biologically programmed to shun stealing/murdering/cheating?
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