addressalign-toparrow-leftarrow-rightbackbellblockcalendarcameraccwchatcheckchevron-downchevron-leftchevron-rightchevron-small-downchevron-small-leftchevron-small-rightchevron-small-upchevron-upcircle-with-checkcircle-with-crosscircle-with-pluscrosseditemptyheartexportfacebookfolderfullheartglobegmailgoogleimageimagesinstagramlinklocation-pinmagnifying-glassmailminusmoremuplabelShape 3 + Rectangle 1outlookpersonplusprice-ribbonImported LayersImported LayersImported Layersshieldstartickettrashtriangle-downtriangle-uptwitteruseryahoo

Meet and Talk

Lets try and get started. Topic for the first meeting, the Imaginary, the Symbolic and the Real.... I find trying to wrestle with Lacan's ideas to be invigorating... if not always successful.  I'll post a starter definition of these three topics that I found on the web... but just what these ideas meant changed over Lacan's career. They are very strong ideas, and do not live in a settled, harmonious relationship to each other but grind together like some immense mill, endlessly spinning off new things to think about.

Join or login to comment.

  • A former member
    A former member

    Sounds great, but I'm always busy the third Thursday of the month. Have fun!

    January 6, 2014

  • ken t.

    If you search for Lacan and any of these three terms you will get lots of references...
    Here is one that takes another stab at diffinition:
    http://www.cla.purdue.edu/english/theory/psychoanalysis/lacanstructure.html

    January 6, 2014

  • ken t.

    The Real: very unlike our conventional conception of objective/collective experience, in Lacanian theory the real becomes that which resists representation, what is pre-mirror, pre-imaginary, pre-symbolic – what cannot be symbolized – what loses it’s "reality" once it is symbolized (made conscious) through language. It is "the aspect where words fail" (Vogler, 2), what Miller describes as, "the ineliminable residue of all articulation, the foreclosed element, which may be approached, but never grasped: the umbilical cord of the symbolic" (280). ...

    http://csmt.uchicago.edu/glossary2004/symbolicrealimaginary.htm

    January 6, 2014

  • ken t.

    The Symbolic: in contrast to the imaginary, the symbolic involves the formation of signifiers and language and is considered to be the "determining order of the subject" (Miller, 279). Seeing the entire system of the unconscious/conscious as manifesting in an endless web of signifiers/ieds and associations, Lacan claims that, "Symbols in fact envelop the life of man in a network so total that they join together, before he comes into the world, those who are going to engender him…" (Language, 42). And, "Man speaks therefore, but it is because the symbol has made him man" (39). The Symbolic Order functions as the way in which the subject is organized and, to a certain extent, how the psyche becomes accessible. It is associated with language, with words, with writing and can be aligned with Peirce’s "symbol" and Saussure’s "signifier." (see symbol-icon-index)

    http://csmt.uchicago.edu/glossary2004/symbolicrealimaginary.htm

    January 6, 2014

  • ken t.

    The Imaginary: the imaginary becomes the internalized image of this ideal, whole, self and is situated around the notion of coherence rather than fragmentation. The imaginary can roughly be aligned with the formation of the ego which serves as the mediator (as in Freud) between the internal and the external world (Vogler, 2). It becomes, in Lacan, the space in which the relation "between the ego and its images" (Miller, 280) is developed. For Pierce, the imaginary is aligned with the "icon" – an image which is "understood" with no (or little) mediation (Pierce, 102); for Saussure the imaginary becomes the "signified" the concept symbolized arbitrarily by a sign (Saussure, 114).

    http://csmt.uchicago.edu/glossary2004/symbolicrealimaginary.htm

    January 6, 2014

  • ken t.

    The Mirror Stage and the Symbolic Order
    According to Lacan, when the infant stumbles upon a mirror (see Mirror), she is suddenly bombarded with an image of herself as whole – whereas she previously experienced existence as a fragmented entity with libidinal needs. The image itself in the mirror is described by Lacan as the "Ideal-I" (Lacan, Mirror, 2). This ego ideal, for Lacan, provides an image of wholeness which constitutes the ego. ....

    ...

    This image in the mirror is the image of coherence – of what makes the world and our place as complete subjects in it make sense. It becomes a process of identification of internal self with that external image. The mirror stage thus represents the infant’s first encounter with subjectivity, with spatial relations, with an external sense of coherence, and with a sense of "I" and "You." .....

    http://csmt.uchicago.edu/glossary2004/symbolicrealimaginary.htm

    January 6, 2014

1 went

  • ken t.
    Organizer,
    Event Host

People in this
Meetup are also in:

Sign up

Meetup members, Log in

By clicking "Sign up" or "Sign up using Facebook", you confirm that you accept our Terms of Service & Privacy Policy