IN THE COMPANY OF MEN at Profiles Theatre (+Pre-show Reception and Talk-Back)

 

A WORLD PREMIERE

IN THE COMPANY OF MEN
by Resident Artist Neil LaBute
Directed by Resident Artist Rick Snyder
http://www.profilestheatre.org/company_of_men.html

Two frustrated young executives vent their pent-up rage via a childish prank and end up paying a price in the psychological dark comedy, In the Company of Men. Former college buddies Chad and Howard, now in their late 20s, work for the same company. When the two begin expressing their mutual frustration regarding their lack of rapid advancement at work and their recent bad luck with women, they hatch a nasty scheme to be enacted over an upcoming six-week-long business trip: Find a vulnerable young woman to court, slather with affection, and then callously dump. They choose a lovely, hearing-impaired typist named Christine, but soon their scheme creates escalating tension and psychological games not only with hapless Christine, but also with each other.

SPECIAL CHICAGO THEATER GOERS MEETUP GROUP RATE:
TICKETS: $20.00 ($15.00 SAVINGS)
INCLUDES:
7:00pm: Pre-Show Reception in the Lobby of Profiles Theatre at 4139 N. Broadway.
8:00pm: IN THE COMPANY OF MEN by Resident Artist Neil LaBute
+Post-Show Talk-Back with members of the cast and crew.

To purchase tickets online:
http://boxoffice.printtixusa.com/profilestheatre/eventcalendar
USE THE CODE: MEETUP

To purchase tickets by phone, please call (773) 549-1815.
MENTION THE CODEWORD: MEETUP

YOU ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR BUYING YOUR OWN TICKET.
Please buy your tickets from Profiles Theatre so they can have an accurate count of Meetup members.

All tickets at Profiles Theatre are General Admission.

Seating is on both sides of the stage, so the audience has a great view from anywhere in the theatre. Please arrive at least 20 minutes before showtime. Due to the intimate set-up for the theatre, there is no late seating. Profiles Theatre is a handicap accessible venue.

Profiles Theatre
The Main Stage
4139 N. Broadway
Chicago, IL 60613
http://www.profilestheatre.org

DIRECTIONS AND PARKING INFO:
Profiles Theatre is conveniently located in the Uptown/Buena Park neighborhood, and very easily accessible by CTA or Lake Shore Drive.
http://www.profilestheatre.org/attending.html

DRIVING:
If coming off of Lake Shore Drive, take Irving Park exit. Make a right on Broadway and continue North to 4139 N. Broadway

If coming off of 90/94, take Irving Park exit and head East to Broadway. Take a left on Broadway and continue North about 2 blocks to 4139 N. Broadway

A pay parking lot is conveniently located at 4100 N. Clarendon, one block East of Profiles for $11.00-$12.00

PUBLIC TRANSPORATATION
TRAIN: The SHERIDAN RED LINE STOP at Irving Park Rd & Sheridan is two blocks from the theatre. Head East on Irving Park Rd for 2 blocks. Turn left on Broadway, continue North to the theatre at 4139 N. Broadway.

BUS: #36 BROADWAY bus stops right in front of the theatre, at the corner of Broadway and Buena. #80 IRVING PARK and #151 SHERIDAN are also nearby.
http://www.transitchicago.com/  

FOLLOW PROFILES THEATRE ON:
FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/ProfilesTheatre  
TWITTER: https://twitter.com/#!/ProfilesTheatre  

PROFILES THEATRE IS A PROUD SPONSOR OF CHICAGO THEATER GOERS MEETUP GROUP

Join or login to comment.

  • Scott C.

    Marvelous show. Fantastic acting. Great set design. They really used the space well. A MUST SEE!
    And, of course, another wonderful pre-show reception.

    1 · May 28, 2013

  • David

    Very enjoyable show.

    May 24, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    You can definitely see parallels here with the play's subject being about love, with the critique on contemporary metropolitan culture, Chad as the rakish figure, the "game" that's being played with Christine, the primitive longings to conquer that the Chad and Howard characters have, the restraints they feel from their society, etc. Jesse S. Darnay
    Author of "The History of Now"
    Check out my bio @ Amazon Author Central
    http://www.amazon.com/Jesse-S.-Darnay/e/B009JW1LYO/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1353897120&sr=8-1

    May 23, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    The satiric import of Restoration comedy resides in the dramatist’s awareness of a familiar incongruity: that between the image of man in his primitive nature and the image of man amid the artificial restraints that society would impose upon him. The satirist in these plays is chiefly concerned with detailing the artful dodges that ladies and gentlemen employ to satisfy nature and to remain within the pale of social decorum. Inevitably, then, hypocrisy is the chief satiric target. The animal nature of man is taken for granted, and so is the social responsibility to keep up appearances; some hypocrisy must follow, and, within limits, society will wink at indiscretions so long as they are discreetly managed. The paradox is typical of those in which the Restoration comic dramatists delight; and the strongly rational and unidealistic ethos of this comedy has its affinities with the naturalistic and skeptical cast of late 17th-century philosophical thought."

    May 23, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    "English comedy of the later 17th century is cast in the Jonsonian mold. Restoration comedy is always concerned with the same subject—the game of love—but the subject is treated as a critique of fashionable society. Its aim is distinctly satiric, and it is set forth in plots of Jonsonian complexity, where the principal intriguer is the rakish hero, bent on satisfying his sexual needs, outside the bonds of marriage, if possible. In the greatest of these comedies—Sir George Etherege’s Man of Mode (1676), for example, or William Wycherley’s Country-Wife (1675) or William Congreve’s Way of the World (1700)—the premium is on the energy and the grace with which the game is played, and the highest dramatic approval is reserved for those who take the game seriously enough to play it with style but who have the good sense to know when it is played out.

    May 23, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    "In the Company of Men" was such a powerful performance! Loved it.

    According to Neil LaBute, in his interview with Profiles Theatre's Artistic Directors (page 13 of the brochure we were handed), LaBute "based a lot of the structure and characters on [Restoration Comedy]," which goes all the way back to 17th century England. Here's what the Encyclopedia Britannica says about Restoration Comedy:

    May 23, 2013

  • Mandy G.

    Due to an expected emergency at work, I will not be able to attend. Boo. Next time!

    May 23, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    Look forward to meeting other people who are interested in the arts.

    May 23, 2013

  • Scott C.

    Cross-posted with Free & Cheap Culture & Night Life Meetup Group : http://www.meetup.com/nightlife-657/

    May 11, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    We are looking forward to the show

    April 27, 2013

23 went

Our Sponsors

People in this
Meetup are also in:

Sometimes the best Meetup Group is the one you start

Get started Learn more
Katie

I'm surprised by the level of growth I've seen since becoming an organizer, it's given me more confidence in my abilities.

Katie, started NYC ICO

Sign up

Meetup members, Log in

By clicking "Sign up" or "Sign up using Facebook", you confirm that you accept our Terms of Service & Privacy Policy