Tucson Atheists Message Board › women, men, atheism, sexism?

women, men, atheism, sexism?

Katie
FastHikr
Tucson, AZ
Post #: 53
short piece w/ many interesting links....enjoy!

http://msmagazine.com...­
A former member
Post #: 497
Thanks Katie for the post.

Read it and thought that many of the comments in the article could be used to stereotype the wants and needs of women whether they are Atheists or not. I wonder if anyone will one day figure out one day that women are people and come in many shapes and sizes with different thoughts and values. Some aspects of biology around child bearing time kick in, but they certainly didn't with me, so that stereotype is not functioning here either. My thoughts were able to decide, not my biology.

A lot of stereotypes are breaking down in society and the article was still working within the framework of stereotypes. They didn't EVEN consider another possibility for women not being leaders (which really showed off the stereotypical framework of the writer) that perhaps, just perhaps, we are comfortable and confident enough about our own views that we don't feel like being the group mom anymore. (Definitely a leadership position. A lot of men are group moms and if they weren't particularly good with their own children, how well do you think they will be at leadership?) Really. Think about it. It takes a tremendous amount of time, constructing your point-of-view, then defending it, as well as, group organizing, referee for nasty internal disputes, figuring out group activities acceptable to everyone and being the cheerleader for future activism, etc. How do you really want to spend your life? Do you really care about every knee-jerk angry person with an axe to grind to add toxicity into your world? The article basically said that there are very few female Atheists and the Atheists are primarily angry white males. I have not seen that as a generality, but hey, we live in laid back Tucson except for election season. (hehehehe) The ability to accomplish those said tasks is what leadership can demand. The job entails becoming a psychologist with services given for free.

Do women still have the role of taking care of everybody and the required function of being available to everyone 24/7 or are they a selfish bitch because they don't care or do just what they want to do when they want to do it with the time they have left on this earth (some of which may include kindness and caring to people they select, not who demand it or constantly need validation?) It is the same old story of a male doing what he wants is not considered selfish, just male. Perhaps the women just figured out that the job may have no relevance to their own life plan. They just may have figured out the downside of power and it isn't worth their time.

Also, is it worth their time to proselytize or disparage another point-of-view? The article assumes that it is the female lack of confidence in action. In the most polite of terms-oh, BS. There just isn't any point to it. Not worth someone's time, raising of one's blood pressure or adrenaline levels. Not all women function as public service announcements.

As an atheist, during this lifetime, what the hell are we waiting for? As the old saying goes, "life is no dress rehearsal". Death comes and it is final, so get on with it. Anybody in their right mind needs to examine their need for leadership - what does it fulfill for them. Most of its fulfillments are for personal gain (usually some sort of control or emotional demand and if not, for altruism, is their altruism probably going to serve a good outcome? Being an Atheist woman is basically stepping away from just about everything society has demanded of us and perhaps it takes a very confident smart person to do that. So, popsicles anyone after we go to the park?

That being said, will people now think there are no ethics in that woman, or that they may be promiscuous because they "live in the moment" and not for some afterlife or whatever dumb assumption they need to put on another human being because they can't wrap their head around it because their world view never experienced that point of view in a woman.

So, leadership within Atheism, regardless of the sex - aside from what I said above, would need a mission statement. We as a group haven't even defined our mutual beliefs and therefore defined Atheism. It has diverse meanings within just our small local group, but we have all agreed upon separation of church and state as our "like mind".. If we ever do give it a group definition, it will be called a religion. If that happens, I'm outta here. I just like "hanging" with the folks and sometimes agreeing and sometimes disagreeing and sometimes having fun together that neither of those things is relevant. In fact, option three is my preference. It is a loosely defined community for me that isn't always of like thinkers but at least I don't have to listen to the someone about their God or their constant interjections of godlike phrases.

After all of that, many thanks to our incredibly tolerant and hardworking leader, Don Lacey who tirelessly works to do all of the tasks of leadership I have mentioned above. It is recognized, appreciated and I am glad I get to enjoy just being part of the group, but I am having a sudden urge to go rewrite the dictionary - starting with the word stereotype.

Mitchell
zenguy
Tucson, AZ
Post #: 81
My main thought after reading this article is that we should separate our disbelief in gods from our dislike of the established religions. The former is what we mean by "atheism", the latter does not have a common name. Perhaps there is a better term than "anti-religion"?

There are far more people, including women, who have antipathy for established religion, than there are those who firmly believe that there is no god. Many people, although not believing in the Old Jew in the Sky, still believe in some kind of mysterious force or universal mind that permeates the universe in some way.
My own feeling is that we should welcome such people.

I don't know how we would go about emphasizing anti-religion as opposed to dogmatic atheism, but I think it would help the movement quite a bit.

Another complication is that we don't all agree that religion is bad. There are some atheists who think that the common people need religion, even if they themselves don't.

M
A former member
Post #: 501
Mitchell:

I think the topic was sexism in the Atheist Community. But out of curiosity, you posted:

"still believe in some kind of mysterious force or universal mind that permeates the universe in some way.
My own feeling is that we should welcome such people".

So are you saying that you are exploring atheists and how they believe while you maintain a belief in the mysterious force? "My own feeling is that we should welcome such people." Just curious.

Deb
Mitchell
zenguy
Tucson, AZ
Post #: 82
Mitchell:

I think the topic was sexism in the Atheist Community. But out of curiosity, you posted:

"still believe in some kind of mysterious force or universal mind that permeates the universe in some way.
My own feeling is that we should welcome such people".

So are you saying that you are exploring atheists and how they believe while you maintain a belief in the mysterious force? "My own feeling is that we should welcome such people." Just curious.

Deb

Yes, it's true that the article was about the shortage of females among the publicly professed atheists. I'm not sure what I was smoking when I wrote my reply. :) (Actually, I don't smoke anything nowadays.) Fortunately, there are plenty of women in our local atheist community.

I personally believe in mystery. I think that we know nothing, we are immersed in mystery, swimming in it. You can call that a religion if you wish, but it's kind of the opposite of traditional religion, which pretends to knows fundamental truths.

"Embrace the Mystery"
A former member
Post #: 502
Ah-ha! Mitchell, I did giggle at your comment about the Old Jew in the Sky. Very comical. biggrin
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