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Let's discuss Muriel Spark's short story "Bang Bang You're Dead".

This 22-page semi-autobiographical story, set in Africa, explores standard Spark themes of fate, foreknowledge, and perception, as in her famous novel "The Prime Of Miss Jean Brodie" . As novelist Malcolm Bradbury wrote, Spark is "a writer of brilliance and pain who from the start of her career has been exploring and developing some of the most complex aspects of the contemporary form of fiction". Dame Muriel Spark, a convert to Catholicism, was born in Scotland in 1918 and resided in Italy from 1967 until her death in 2006.

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  • dan

    I read the story only 1/2 hour before and learned as we went along. The story is a well written tour de force which requires careful examination. I perceived it as the tale of an expatriate, who becomes unstable from colonialist duty in Africa. Upon seeing an amateur film of her routine life in Africa, she projects her childhood games and friends into an imaginary and exciting later life in the dark continent. Otherwise the relation between childhood and adulthood becomes an inventive trick - repeating in adulthood the elements of a childhood would be amateurish and not the work of a professional writer.

    December 17, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    Sorry for the late change, but I have to stay late at work. Again. I really enjoyed the story and have been reading more of Spark's work, so thank you for introducing me to an author I hadn't heard of even if I can't be there to discuss!

    December 17, 2013

  • Rory P.

    I had planned to attend, but my copy of the book, ordered some time ago, still has not arrived in the mail. I guess I'll read it and discuss it with myself when it arrives. The Montesquieu selection next month should be no problem, since it is a free download (in French) at Gutenberg. See you then!

    December 16, 2013

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