Westside Science & Religion Discussion Group Message Board › How old is the invention of writing?

How old is the invention of writing?

This message board is read-only.

A former member
Post #: 1,424
For a long time many people did not believe that writing existed in the time period of the biblical Moses, but during approximately the past 100 years archaeologists have discovered writings which date to about 3500 BCE to 3000 BCE. Thus while much of the Bible has been shown to be incorrect, some of the claims of the Bible are true, such as the existence of writing during the time period of about 1500 BCE to 1400 BCE (the time period which the Bible dates to Israelite exodus from Egypt).

This web page talks about when and where writing was invented. It says that it was invented about 3500 BCE and that the invention of it is credited to the ancient Sumerians in Mesopotamia. This web page dates Egyptian writing to about 3400 BCE.

Interestingly, the name "Moses" is of Egyptian origin, at least according to this scholarly article on jstor.org.
A former member
Post #: 1,467
Did the ancient Hebrew scribes learn how to read and write from the ancient Egyptians, Phoenicians, or others, or did they invent it independently?
A former member
Post #: 10
Interestingly, the name "Moses" is of Egyptian origin, at least according to this scholarly article on jstor.org.

I have read that the name Moses is actually Hebrew, meaning "To Draw Out" since he supposedly was taken out of the water.
A former member
Post #: 1,473
Interestingly, the name "Moses" is of Egyptian origin, at least according to this scholarly article on jstor.org.

I have read that the name Moses is actually Hebrew, meaning "To Draw Out" since he supposedly was taken out of the water.

I was told the same thing, though in Watchtower publications, but I no longer believe everything that the Watchtower teaches. I am also aware that other Christian publications also teach it is a Hebrew name with the meaning which you state. Would you mind stating the publication source which you read?

A Wikipedia article called "Moses" presents both ideas, for it says the following:

Name
Moses and the tablets of law

The biblical text explains the name Mošeh משה as a derivation of the root mšh משה "to draw", in Exodus 2:10:

"[...] she called his name Moses (משה): and she said, Because I drew him (משיתהו­) out of the water." (KJV).[8]

The name is thus suggested to relate to drawing out in a passive sense, "the one who was drawn out". Those who depart from this tradition derive the name from the same root but in an active sense, "he who draws out", in the sense of "saviour, deliverer".[9] The form of the name as recorded in the Masoretic text is indeed the expected form of the Biblical Hebrew active participle.[10] Josephus argued for an Egyptian etymology, and some scholarly suggestions have followed this in deriving the name from Coptic terms mo "water" and `uses "save, deliver", suggesting a meaning "saved from the water".[11]

Another suggestion has connected the name with the Egyptian ms, as found in Tuth-mose and Ra-messes, meaning "born" or "child".[8][12]

Powered by mvnForum

Our Sponsors

People in this
Meetup are also in:

Log in

Not registered with us yet?

Sign up

Meetup members, Log in

By clicking "Sign up" or "Sign up using Facebook", you confirm that you accept our Terms of Service & Privacy Policy