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Re: [Wild-Foodies-of-Philly] Pokeweed root

From: Rich J.
Sent on: Monday, February 4, 2013 11:03 PM
The hospital will give her activated charcoal no doubt. It's always good to have it on hand there are many other uses also:

January 30, 2013 (hour 2) - Guest John & Kimberly Dinsley educates us on the benefits of Activated Charcoal
January 30, 2013 (hour 3) - rest of interview

How to download these archives:
Right click (mac-control click) and choose one of the following: Internet Explorer "save target as", Mozilla FireFox "save link as", Safari "download linked file", then select the location on your computer to save the file to (mac users should find the downloaded files in their download directory) 
Today's Guests

Being able to safely and effectively absorb toxins in your body is just one benefit of using charcoal among many. JOHN & KIMBERLY DINSLEY  will be explaining just what charcoal can be used for from gastrointestinal problems and food poisoning to pink eye!   

 

Activated charcoal removes toxins and other chemicals from air, water and blood. In particular, activated charcoal is a go-to therapy for people who have ingested poisonous materials or overdosed on drugs. Activated charcoal can be purchased without a prescription and used safely at home, but you should always contact a health professional when a poisoning or overdose occurs.

 

Charcoal Science

The simplest description of charcoal is the cold hard black remains left over after your campfire has gone out. Essentially all the water has been evaporated off (Pyrolysis), along with some volatile constituents, leaving behind the familiar crusty crumbly black chunks. Now charcoal can be made from the bones of animals, or coal, but for medicinal use it has historically come primarily from plant-based sources such as hardwood, bamboo, coconut, or peat. But, what is left after the fire goes out is, apart from a few trace minerals, pure carbon, just like the carbon atoms that make up the soft graphites in a "lead" pencil or the 345 carat diamonds in a golden crown. What makes the carbons different from each other is their distinct physical structures.

 

Activated charcoal works through several different mechanisms

Adsorption* (not to be confused with absorption), the most well known mechanism, acts by electrostatically binding molecules to the surfaces of the charcoal particle - technically known as Van der Waals forces, or chemisorption. Then there are chemical reduction reactions - as when charcoal is used to remove chlorine from water. Activated charcoal can also catalyze a number of chemical conversions, or can be a carrier of catalytic agents such as precious metals. An example is using silver impregnated charcoal to disinfect water. Charcoal can also act as a carrier of biomass, as in supporting material in biological filters used in your backyard goldfish pond. Another function is as a carrier of chemicals as in slow release color applications - food dyes and pigments. Are there more mechanisms? Scientists suspect there are.
*adsorb/adsorption - technically, a surface-based adhesion of atoms, ions, molecules from a gas, liquid, or dissolved solid, as distinguished from absorption which involves the entire volume of the material. To put it into simple terms - when you eat a banana cream pie you absorb it; when you get a banana cream pie thrown in your face you adsorb it.

 

For extensive information on Charcoal, visit www.charcoalremedies.com  

 

Click HERE to learn how to make a gel & regular Charcoal Poultice

 

Additional Resources:

>> View the Health Conditions page to see the number of conditions that can benefit from activated charcoal 

 

  Related Articles:

 

Video: Colobus Monkey Medicine 

Colobus monkeys have delevoped a novel way of healing themselves by using the man-made environment around them to it's full potential and stealing charcoal. Amazing wildlife film from BBC Worldwide.

 

Book: Charcoal Remedies (by) John Dinsley  - Available at ThePowerMall.com or by calling[masked] Mon-Fri, 8 to 4 Central Time.  

 

 

 

 

Additional Book: Charcoal: Startling New Facts About the World's Powerful Clinical Absorbent (by) Calvin Thrash M.D. and Agatha Thrash M.D.  

 

Products Available: Activated Medicinal Charcoal Powder or Capsules,



--- On Mon, 2/4/13, Carla <[address removed]> wrote:

From: Carla <[address removed]>
Subject: Re: [Wild-Foodies-of-Philly] Pokeweed root
To: [address removed]
Date: Monday, February 4, 2013, 5:27 PM

Ive been told only young leaves above the red on the stalk are edible if boiled three times discarding the water each time.  Ive also seen people boiling it once and getting away with it. but never the root.
I suggest bring her to the hospital, sooner the better, but Im wondering, how does she know its pokeweed because Its not up yet.  I would also suggesting bringing the root to someone that knows for positive identification.  Carla



On Feb 4, 2013, at 5:16 PM, Allison wrote:

> Thanks, everyone! I'm still checking out the links and I called The National Poison Control Center (who advised an ER trip). Just need to convince her to go now... I think she's more embarrassed than worrying about her health...
>
> Allison
>
> On 2/4/2013 1:49 PM, Betsy Bolton wrote:
>> I would call the National Poison Control center for advice.  Phytollacatoxin is a toxin, a poison.  People eat poke leaves but only (usually) after boiling in several changes of water.
>>
>> See symptoms at
>> http://health.nytimes.com/health/guides/poison/pokeweed-poisoning/overview.html
>>
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> From: "Allison" <[address removed]>
>> To: [address removed]
>> Sent: Monday, February 4,[masked]:20:35 PM
>> Subject: [Wild-Foodies-of-Philly] Pokeweed root
>>
>> Hi all,
>> I hope it's ok to post a question to this list--not sure where else to
>> get good info.
>> Does anyone know about safety eating the root of pokeweed? My
>> mother-in-law dug up pokeweed roots last week and soaked the sliced root
>> in water for several days, stir-fried it and ate it. Then she didn't
>> feel very well. Would this be an allergic reaction or possibly poisoning
>> that needs treatment?
>>
>> thanks in advance!
>> Allison
>>
>>
>>
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This message was sent by Carla   ([address removed]) from Wild Foodies of Philly.
To learn more about Carla  , visit his/her member profile: http://www.meetup.com/Wild-Foodies-of-Philly/members/14230397/
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