The London Expat American Meetup Group Message Board › Sean Hoare: News of the World phone hacking whistleblower found dead‎

Sean Hoare: News of the World phone hacking whistleblower found dead‎

Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 3,609


News Of The World Whistleblower Reportedly Found Dead‎
Damn, Rupert don't play!
http://tpmmuckraker.t...­
http://www.dailymail....­

In another twist in the News Of The World scandal, a former reporter for the tabloid who initially alleged that editor Andy Coulson knew about the practice of phone hacking by his staff, was reportedly found dead Monday.

The Guardian reports that though police wouldn't confirm the identity of the man found dead, it is believed to be Sean Hoare, formerly of NOTW and The Sun, who worked under Coulson but was fired for alcohol and drug problems in 2005. According to the police report, "the death is currently being treated as unexplained, but not thought to be suspicious. Police investigations into this incident are ongoing."

From the police statement, via The Guardian:

At 10.40am today [Monday 18 July] police were called to Langley Road, Watford, following the concerns for the welfare of a man who lives at an address on the street. Upon police and ambulance arrival at a property, the body of a man was found. The man was pronounced dead at the scene shortly after.

Hoare reported on show business for NOTW, and was the first journalist to go on the record with allegations that Coulson knew about the hacking operations. He told the New York Times last September that Coulson not only knew about the practice, but "actively encouraged me to do it."

Talking Points Memo on FacebookLast week he explained to the Times that the paper would allegedly pay $500 a pop for "pinging," the process of illicitly tracking cell phones, which only law enforcement officials can do legally with case-by-case authorization. Hoare said that once he became aware of the practice, it was his understanding that the information was provided by police officers.

Hoare told The Guardian that reporters would go to the news desk to locate someone and would have an answer within "15 to 30 minutes": "You'd just go to the news desk and they'd just come back to you. You don't ask any questions. You'd consider it a job done. The chain of command is one of absolute discipline and that's why I never bought into it, like with Andy saying he wasn't aware of it and all that. That's bollocks."

Coulson, who was NOTW editor from 2003-2007, has maintained that he was unaware of the hacking. He was arrested for questioning in connection with the scandal, but released on July 8.

Sean Hoare - NoW Whistle-Blower Found Dead - Speaking About Hacking In March 2011



News of the World journalist who claimed Coulson encouraged phone hacking is found dead at home
Sean Hoare: Hacking was 'endemic' at News of the World
http://www.bbc.co.uk/...­

Found dead at his flat in Watford, Herts

Reporter's claims last autumn reignited scandal
Ex News of the World journalist said Coulson's denials of phone hacking were 'a lie'

Police probing former showbiz reporter's 'suicide'
Friends suggest he may have died of natural causes
Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 3,615




Murdoch hit by foam pie at 'humbling' British hearing
Transcript Highlights: Brooks Gives Evidence
The real issue is Murdock in the dock
http://uk.news.yahoo....­

Protester announces pie attack on Twitter
http://uk.news.yahoo....­

Tom Watson MP: Was criminality endemic at News of The World?

Rupert: Endemic is such a harsh word.....

But beyond all the joking, many Twitterers also pointed out the negative impact of the attack. "So Jonnie Marbles made the committee feel sorry for Rupes, and made the nation fall in love with Wendi #nottheplan #whatachump", wrote @emmacox.

Or, according to @jamesrbuk: "As well as being straight out wrong, foam attack distracts from Murdochs' evidence. Done 'em a favour. Idiot." Media fall all over themselves to defend Murdock.

Ruperts most humble day, yet







The Man Who Pied Murdoch
Jonnie Marbles, aka Jonathan May-Bowles
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May-Bowles gave his 1,000-plus Twitter followers hints that he was up to something when he tweeted, “Does anyone know what order the CMS select committee will be interviewing witnesses?” Soon thereafter, he revealed, “I'm actually in this committee and can confirm: Murdoch is Mr. Burns,” referencing Homer’s stereotypical corporate-America boss and villain on The Simpsons, and he’s not the first to make the comparison. Four years ago, Murdoch was parodied by the cartoon series and reportedly wrote his own introduction: "I'm Rupert Murdoch, the billionaire tyrant.”

Though the pie-in-the-face bit is a longstanding comedic gag, May-Bowles, who wound up receiving the brunt of the pie’s contents on his face in addition to Murdoch’s wife’s left hook, is probably not laughing. The police confirmed to The Guardian that he’s been detained, and the hearing resumed as if it never happened, minus Murdoch’s jacket.











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Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 3,690

Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 3,702


"I hope Andy Coulson is going to be rushed through the courts, to send out a strong message." ~ Armando Iannucci
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http://inagist.com/se...­ hope Andy Coulson is going to be rushed through the courts
Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 3,726
ABC News Hacking inquiry puts heat back on Murdoch
Financial Times - Kiran Stacey, Tim Bradshaw - ‎20 minutes ago
http://www.ft.com/cms...­



James Murdoch was shown the explosive e-mail at the heart of the phone hacking scandal, contrary to what he told parliament earlier this year, a committee of MPs has heard today.

September 6, 2011 3:41 pm

Hacking inquiry puts heat back on Murdoch
By Kiran Stacey, Tim Bradshaw and Salamander Davoudi

Testimony by four former News International employees on Tuesday throws the focus of the investigation into hacking at the News of the World back on to Les Hinton, who led News Corp’s British newspaper business between 1995 and 2007, and Mr Murdoch, News Corp’s European chief and deputy chief operating officer.

Speaking before the culture, media and sport select committee, Colin Myler, the News of the World’s former editor, and Tom Crone, who left as News Group Newspapers’ legal manager in August, said it was “inconceivable” that Mr Murdoch was unaware in 2008 of the significance of the e-mail which proved hacking went beyond a single rogue reporter at the Sunday newspaper.

James Murdoch was shown the explosive e-mail at the heart of the phone hacking scandal, contrary to what he told parliament earlier this year, a committee of MPs has heard.

The meeting at which the “For Neville” e-mail was discussed saw Mr Murdoch authorise a payment of £425,000 plus legal costs to Gordon Taylor, a football executive.

“Since he gave us the authority we were asking for, I would take it that for the first time he realised News of the World was involved [in illegal voicemail interception] and that involvement involved people going beyond Clive Goodman,” Mr Crone said.

Until earlier this year, News International insisted that phone hacking had been limited to the work of Mr Goodman, the NoW’s former royal reporter who was imprisoned with private investigator Glenn Mulcaire for illegal voicemail interception in 2007.

“What document I showed and what I relayed in the meeting was that a transcript of Gordon Taylor voicemails had passed through our office back by email to Glenn Mulcaire,” Mr Crone said. “There was evidence that illegal activity had passed through our office and that NoW was implicated. I would have explained the background to the litigation and the stance we had taken up and would have explained what this document meant.”

The testimony makes it more likely that Mr Murdoch will be recalled by the committee for questioning, although MPs are yet to decide formally on whether or not to do so.

Mr Crone also told MPs that News International had employed a freelance journalist to investigate the private lives of lawyers acting for people claiming they had been hacked by the News of the World.

He said that he had seen “one thing or two” in relation to the private lives of two of the lawyers defending claimants in the civil suits against NI.

But he denied a string of other allegations, including that the Sun, News International’s flagship daily tabloid, also employed Mr Mulcaire.

Earlier in the same hearing, Jonathan Chapman, News International’s former director of legal affairs, and Daniel Cloke, its former group human resources director, told MPs that Mr Hinton had made the decision to keep paying Mr Goodman and his legal fees after his imprisonment, to avoid a public tribunal over claims of unfair dismissal.

“We didn’t take the decision,” said Mr Chapman. “The decision was taken by Mr Hinton. It was a stark choice: settle at a reasonable figure or end up in tribunal several months down the line, where Mr Goodman would be able to make a number of allegations in a public forum. This is a pragmatic and commercial business decision. Many big companies pay out on employment claims of little or no merit because they don’t want stuff to be raked up, even if allegations are unfounded.”

Mr Crone also said that Andy Coulson, the former News of the World editor at the time of the hacking who went on to work as the prime minister’s communications chief, had originally wanted to ensure that Mr Goodman was given a job at the paper after he had served his sentence.

The chairman of the select committee told the FT that no further decision on recalls would be taken until next week. News International declined to comment.
Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 3,845


Hacking 'made Milly's parents think she was alive'
By Danny Kemp | AFP – 28 minutes ago
http://uk.news.yahoo....­

The parents of murdered schoolgirl Milly Dowler told Britain's phone-hacking inquiry Monday they thought she was still alive after the News of the World tabloid deleted some of her messages.

Sally Dowler described how she told her husband "She's picked up her voicemails Bob, she's alive!" after an investigator working for the tabloid erased some of the 13-year-old's voicemails following her disappearance.


The Dowlers were the first victims of illegal hacking by the Rupert Murdoch-owned paper to testify to the televised hearing in London chaired by a senior judge, and were to be followed later by Hollywood star Hugh Grant.

The News of the World, Britain's top-selling Sunday newspaper, was shut down amid public revulsion after revelations about the hacking of Milly's phone emerged in July.

The Dowlers sat beside Grant at the hearing, before taking the stand and telling the inquiry that after Milly went missing in March 2002 they initially checked her voicemails "all the time".

At first, a recorded message left by their daughter before her disappearance would come up, but the voicemail box soon became full and an automatic message would play instead, Sally Dowler said.

But one day, she added, her voice rising with emotion: "I rang her phone and it went on to her voicemail. So I heard her voice, and it was just like I jumped, 'She's picked up her voicemails Bob, she's alive!'"

"I told my friends, 'she's picked up her voicemail, she's picked up her voicemail'."

In fact, Milly had been abducted and was later found murdered. British serial killer Levi Bellfield was convicted of her murder in June this year.

As well as listening to Milly's voicemails, the News of the World's private detective Glenn Mulcaire erased some messages to make room for new ones.

Mulcaire was jailed along with the News of the World's former royal editor Clive Goodman in January 2007 after they admitted intercepting voicemail messages left on phones belonging to royal aides.

Sally Dowler said that earlier this year, when they were told by police about the hacking of their daughter's phone, "the first thing I thought" was about the deletion of the messages.

"As soon as I was told it was about phone hacking, literally I didn't sleep for about three nights because you replay everything in your mind and just think, 'oh, that makes sense now, that makes sense'."

The couple also described how the newspaper intruded on their grief by using a picture of them retracing Milly's route when she was abducted.

Sally Dowler also said that for the British press, the inquiry was an "opportunity to do things right in future and have some decent standards."

Separately Graham Shear, who is the solicitor for England footballer Ashley Cole and previously represented actor Jude Law, told the inquiry that in 2008, paparazzi began to arrive at his house before his clients did for privately arranged meetings.

The hacking scandal led to the resignations of some of Murdoch's key lieutenants, two of Britain's top policemen and prompted Prime Minister David Cameron to set up the Leveson inquiry into the standards of the British press.

Grant, the star of "Four Weddings and a Funeral" and "Notting Hill", is expected to say that press intrusion is making the life of the mother of his child a misery.

The actor is expected to condemn paparazzi for hounding Chinese actress Hong Tinglan, the mother of his baby daughter, who was recently granted a High Court injunction prohibiting harassment of her and the child.

Lord Justice Brian Leveson's inquiry will hear this week from other alleged victims of media intrusion, including actress Sienna Miller, Harry Potter author JK Rowling and Gerry McCann, the father of the missing Madeleine McCann.

Leveson has made it clear that the inquiry will hear evidence that the News of the World was not the only newspaper engaging in harassment.


Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 3,846


Hacking 'made Milly's parents think she was alive'
Professor Brian Cathcart, one of the founders of the ‘Hacked Off’ campaign for a public inquiry into phone hacking and works closely with the Dowler Family
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Hacking 'made Milly's parents think she was alive'
By Danny Kemp | AFP – 28 minutes ago
http://uk.news.yahoo....­
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The parents of murdered schoolgirl Milly Dowler told Britain's phone-hacking inquiry Monday they thought she was still alive after the News of the World tabloid deleted some of her messages.

Sally Dowler described how she told her husband "She's picked up her voicemails Bob, she's alive!" after an investigator working for the tabloid erased some of the 13-year-old's voicemails following her disappearance.


Sky, the news channel owned by Rupert Murdoch's News Corp is accused in court of reporting kidnap release too soon
Reuters – 30 minutes ago
http://uk.news.yahoo....­

Sky is the news channel owned by Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. Not learned thier lesson~ Unless thet lesson is that they can continue to get away with it!

LONDON (Reuters) - The Attorney General was given the go-ahead on Monday to launch contempt of court proceedings against Sky News for being too quick to report the release last year of a British couple kidnapped by Somali pirates.

Paul and Rachel Chandler were freed in Somalia on Nov 14, 2010, more than a year after they were seized aboard their yacht near the Seychelles archipelago.

To protect them during their captivity, the British Foreign Office had obtained an injunction banning news organisations from releasing any information about them until they were freed and had reached a "place of safety" out of Somalia.

Sky was one of the first news outlets to report the couple's release, and the government says the channel violated the order because the pair were not yet out of harm's way when it broke the news.

Sky is the news channel of satellite broadcaster BSkyB's, part owned by Rupert Murdoch's News Corp.

Lord Justice Martin Moore-Bick, sitting at the High Court, said: "We are satisfied this is a proper case for the Attorney General to be allowed to pursue the matter," according to the Press Association.

Sky, which was not represented at the brief hearing, said it had "scrupulously observed" the terms of the injunction and had "followed the spirit, if not the letter" of the order.

Journalistic practices are under intense scrutiny in Britain following a scandal at News Corp's now-closed News of the World tabloid, in which people working for the paper illegally listened to phone messages to unearth stories.

Murdoch's News Corp failed in its bid to buy the share of BSkyB it did not already own in the summer, as politicians turned against the firm.

Earlier on Monday, BSkyB said it had appointed external lawyers to review the emails of some of its most successful journalists to check that there were no signs of illegal newsgathering.

(Reporting by Stefano Ambrogi)



Nothing merely "happens" any more: every occurrence is now an "event", which leaps up and down pointing excitedly at itself. Once, the end of a school term would be marked with a shabby disco down the village hall; you'd turn up wearing the one pair of jeans you owned and circumnavigate the dancefloor nodding your head to the sound of Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go. Now, in 2011, teenagers don outfits chosen by their personal stylist weeks in advance and arrive at their school "prom" in a stretch Hummer. Come, friendly asteroids, and fall on Earth.
http://www.guardian.c...­

Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 4,045
Phone hacking: News of the World journalists lied to Milly Dowler police
Surrey police report released by MPs reveals reporters interfered with investigation as well as hacking missing girl's phone

Murdock tampered with missing girl's phone
http://www.guardian.c...­
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Phone hacking: a newly released report has revealed that News of the World journalists interfered in Surrey police's investigation into the Milly Dowler case.

News of the World journalists who hacked Milly Dowler's phone told a string of lies and interfered with the investigation into her disappearance in 2002, according to a Surrey police report released by a parliamentary committee.

In a month that has already seen the News of the World apologise for hacking three dozen celebrities and crime victims, the Surrey report released on Monday paints an even more graphic picture of tabloid methods. It parallels the evidence revealed at the current Leveson inquiry into press behaviour.

However, the Surrey police report does not shed any further light on the still unresolved question of how voicemails came to be deleted from Dowler's phone. They say the Metropolitan police, which are investigating phone hacking at the News of the World, have still not reached a final conclusion.

"When and the extent to which Milly's mobile phone voicemail was unlawfully accessed (and whether any messages were deleted) are matters which form part of the MPS's ongoing investigation."

Last July, the Guardian reported that the NoW hacked Dowler's phone and deleted messages in the first few days after her disappearance in March 2002. After further inquiries, the Metropolitan police suggested in December that while the tabloid did hack Dowler's phone, it was unlikely to have been responsible for specific deletions that caused her parents to have false hopes that she was alive.

Today's published Surrey timeline, based on police logs from 2002, depicts a news organisation that tried to bully detectives into backing its own misguided theories, as police searched desperately for clues about the girl who went missing on March 21 2002.

According to the file, the reporters were so confident of their own power that they openly admitted the paper had obtained tapes of the voicemails on Dowler's phone. Their misinterpretation of the messages then made them mistakenly believe she was still alive.

Rather than tell her family and police of this important information, however, it appears they concentrated on getting a scoop. Reporters made calls to an employment agency with which they thought she had registered, and sent what the agency called "hordes" of reporters to harass them. Only on the Saturday immediately before publication, did they contact the authorities.

The Surrey files have been edited to withold the names of the journalists, two of whom are currently under criminal investigation by the Metropolitan police's Operation Weeting. What Surrey police do describe, however, is the way they first learned of interference in their investigation.

In mid-April 2002, an employment agency in the north of England, which had no involvement whatever with Dowler, rang to complain. Staff arrived for work "to find hordes of reporters from the News of the World waiting". The firm said: "We have had a News of the World reporter harassing us today. He says that our agency has recruited Milly as an employee, demanding to know what we know and saying he is working in full co-operation with the police." However, the Surrey report says "the NoW reporter's assertion that he was working with the police was untrue".

The previous day, someone also had rung the agency pretending to be Milly's mother. The files show a NoW reporter subsequently claimed to police that the agency had admitted the 13-year-old Dowler was registered for employment with them. This claim also proved untrue.

On 13 April, the police heard from the NoW directly. A journalist demanded "to be put in touch with a senior police officer". He claimed "he had what could be significant information". The journalist disclosed that "the recruitment agency had telephoned the mobile phone number of Milly Dowler [and left a voicemail message] with an offer of work".

Police at first thought this story of a voicemail must be the work of a hoaxer. They eventually discovered that it was "a pure coincidence … of no evidential value". The agency had merely rung the wrong number by mistake, and left a message for "Nana", which the reporters had persuaded themselves sounded like "Amanda", Milly's proper name.

But the News of the World refused to accept its story had been knocked down. One reporter insisted that it could not be a hoax because "the NoW had got Milly's mobile phone number and pin from school children".

The NoW had five reporters working on the story, it told police, and it printed a story in its first edition on 14 April 2002 claiming police were "intrigued" by the alleged new lead. It quoted verbatim from three voicemails, and gave the impression they had been retrieved by the police themselves. After protests from Surrey police, the story was modified in later editions to suggest that the employment agency message was merely a hoax.

The paper wrote detailing further voicemail messages it possessed, and demanding police supply more information.

One reporter said "what the Surrey police press officer was telling him was not true and was inconceivable … the NoW was moving its investigation to the north of England, that Milly had been there in person and that she had applied for a job in a factory. The unidentified reporter whose name has been redacted said that the NoW "know this 110% – we are absolutely certain".

But according to the newly released report, the NoW's "110%" certainty was simply based on illegal interceptions, a misunderstanding of the facts, and an apparent confidence that police would not dare take action against it for phone hacking.

The former News of the World journalist, Neville Thurlbeck, told Channel 4 News last week that he had been acting as news editor at the time of the hunt for Dowler. But he said he had not been aware that her voicemails had been hacked by the paper.

The Surrey police flatly contradict the suggestion that they could have been the source of the Dowler voicemails which were published in the News of the World at the time, a claim made both by Thurlbeck and by Tom Crone, the NOW's former lawyer, in his evidence to the committee. They say: "The NoW obtained that information by accessing Milly Dowler's voicemail". No one at Surrey police was aware of its existence until told by the NoW journalists.

The committee chairman, Conservative MP John Whittingdale, told Sky News the paper "appears as if they may have actually interfered or impeded the police in their investigations".

Conservative committee member Damian Collins said: "Of all of the documents and evidence that have been produced by our phone-hacking inquiry, this is the most sickening and exposes the black hearts of those involved in perpetrating and covering up this scandal."
Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 4,046
Phone hacking: News of the World journalists lied to Milly Dowler police
Surrey police report released by MPs reveals reporters interfered with investigation as well as hacking missing girl's phone

Murdock tampered with missing girl's phone
http://www.guardian.c...­
http://www.guardian.c...­



Phone hacking: a newly released report has revealed that News of the World journalists interfered in Surrey police's investigation into the Milly Dowler case.

• To contact the MediaGuardian news desk email editor@mediaguardian.co.uk or phone 020 3353 3857. For all other inquiries please call the main Guardian switchboard on 020 3353 2000. If you are writing a comment for publication, please mark clearly "for publication".
Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 4,047


Phone hacking: MPs delay publishing Milly Dowler police report
Document understood to detail News of the World journalists' dealings with Surrey police during search for schoolgirl
http://www.guardian.c...­

Murdock tampered with missing girl's phone
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Phone hacking: a newly released report has revealed that News of the World journalists interfered in Surrey police's investigation into the Milly Dowler case.

Phone hacking: MPs have delayed publishing a Surrey police report on the Milly Dowler case.

The Commons culture, media and sport committee has delayed publication of a report from Surrey police into the hacking of Milly Dowler's phone by the News of the World.

Lawyers representing the hacking victims are understood to have objected on the grounds that the Dowler family ought to be consulted first. As a result, Friday morning's planned publication, scheduled for 11.30am, has been postponed.

The document, responding to questions posed to Surrey police by the committee before Christmas, is understood to detail for the first time how senior journalists from the News of the World not only obtained Dowler's phone messages in 2002 but also boasted in writing to police that they had done so, and played them a tape of calls.

Dowler went missing on 21 March 2002, prompting a search by Surrey police, although she was later found murdered. On 14 April 2002 the NoW published a story claiming police were "intrigued" by an alleged new lead derived from voicemails they had obtained from her phone.

The Sunday tabloid quoted verbatim from three voicemails, and gave the impression they had been retrieved by the police themselves. After protests from Surrey police, the story was modified in later editions to suggest that the lead was merely a hoax.

The delay in publishing the report, understood to be based on contemporaneous police files, comes as the news editor of the NoW at the time, Neville Thurlbeck, publicly claimed that it was the police themselves who could have been the source of the voicemails. He also claimed to have been not aware that Dowler's voicemails had been hacked by the paper's own hired private detective, Glenn Mulcaire.

Thurlbeck told Channel 4 News: "There are a variety of sources where this information could have come from. I'm not about to reveal where they came from. But they could have come from the police themselves. They could have come from a police 'source'. It's a mistake to jump to the conclusion that the people on the NoW knew that these voicemails had been hacked."

• To contact the MediaGuardian news desk email editor@mediaguardian.co.uk or phone 020 3353 3857. For all other inquiries please call the main Guardian switchboard on 020 3353 2000. If you are writing a comment for publication, please mark clearly "for publication".


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