The London Expat American Meetup Group Message Board › Bradley Manning, WikiLeaks and Afghanistan - US Citizen in Guantanamo

Bradley Manning, WikiLeaks and Afghanistan - US Citizen in Guantanamo

Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 3,996


Wikileaks Suspect Bradley Manning to be Tried, Says U.S. Tribunal
Bradley Manning, the US Army analyst accused of providing sensitive government data to the Wikileaks whistleblower site, must be tried, according to a military tribunal.
http://www.cio.com/ar...­

Computerworld UK — Bradley Manning, the US Army analyst accused of providing sensitive government data to the Wikileaks whistleblower site, must be tried, according to a military tribunal.

The tribunal recommended that Manning appear before a court martial. Its recommendation echoes that of prosecutors, who pushed for the same during a pre-trial hearing in December, , the BBC reported.

Private Manning, 24, was born in the US but has a Welsh mother, and charities including Amnesty International have argued that he deserves much more support from the British government. He stands accused in the US of "aiding the enemy" by leaking thousands of documents that detailed classified discussions between senior officials, as well as controversial videos of military events.

He was arrested in May 2010, after the Wikileaks cables became the biggest data leak in US history.

If convicted, Manning would likely face a long stint in prison, possibly receiving a life sentence. In December, his lawyers argued that he was struggling with complex pdychological issues, the BBC reported, and that he should not ever have been given access to the data.

In a statement, the US Army tribunal said it had concluded that "reasonable grounds exist to believe that the accused committed the offences alleged". Lt Col Almanza of the tribunal had "recommended that the charges be referred to a general court martial", it stated.

But the recommendation does not mean Manning will be compelled to face a court martial. This would only happen if the commander of the district, Major General Michael Linnington, agrees.

Manning remains under high security in the Fort Leavenworth prison in Kansas.

Meanwhile, Wikileaks founder Julian Assange continues to fight against extradition to Sweden on sex charges. His Supreme Court appeal hearing will take place on 1 and 2 February.
Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 3,997
Despite Clear Evidence of Bias, ‘Show Trial’ of Accused WikiLeaks Whistle-blower Set to Proceed
Press release from the Bradley Manning Support Network. January 12, 2012





[/img]





Wikileaks Suspect Bradley Manning to be Tried, Says U.S. Tribunal
Bradley Manning, the US Army analyst accused of providing sensitive government data to the Wikileaks whistleblower site, must be tried, according to a military tribunal.

Military refers all charges against Bradley Manning to court martial
Despite Clear Evidence of Bias, ‘Show Trial’ of Accused WikiLeaks Whistle-blower Set to Proceed
http://www.bradleyman...­

Press release from the Bradley Manning Support Network. January 12, 2012

WASHINGTON, DC — Military officers orchestrating proceedings against PFC Bradley Manning have referred all charges that were considered during last month’s Article 32 proceedings to a general court martial. Investigating officer Lt. Col. Paul Almanza rejected a request from lead defense counsel David Coombs to consolidate the 22 charges into three charges, expressing concerns that the military is over-charging PFC Manning.

“We’re disappointed but by no means surprised,” said Jeff Paterson, a lead organizer for the Bradley Manning Support Network. “The investigating officer showed no concern for the conflict of interest caused by his dual employment with the Justice Department, or the taint of bias arising from his commander-in-chief, President Obama, who publicly declared Manning to be guilty long before he ever had his day in court.”

Lt. Col. Paul Alamanza, the investigating officer who referred the charges to court martial, refused to recuse himself on the grounds that his employer — the Justice Department — is pursuing a separate investigation into WikiLeaks. He was also criticized for allowing all of the military’s witnesses and evidence to be presented, while prohibiting all but two of the defense’s witnesses from testifying, as well as evidence that could exonerate the accused WikiLeaks whistle-blower.

The recommendations, which now go before the Special Court Martial Convening Authority, include the most serious charge of “aiding the enemy.” Legal observers who followed the Article 32 proceedings noted that military prosecutors never provided evidence of how these materials supposedly harmed national security.

“These charges contradict the administration’s own impact assessments which showed that these WikiLeaks revelations posed no threat to our national security” said Kevin Zeese, a legal adviser to the Bradley Manning Support Network. “But since the Obama administration appears dead set on railroading Bradley Manning through their show trial, we can’t expect them to allow such critical evidence or testimony to be considered. This evidence could have shown that these materials were improperly classified.”

The new convening authority Maj. Gen. Linnington is expected to make a final recommendation on these charges in about a week, with the court martial anticipated to resume in three to five months.

Hundreds of supporters marched and demonstrated in support of Bradley Manning outside the Article 32 proceedings at Fort Meade last month. Organizers say that the Obama administration can expect even larger numbers at the court martial.



Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE

NEWS RELEASE
The U.S. Army Military District of Washington
Guardian of the Nation’s Capital

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE #12-01
DATE: January 12, 2012

Investigating Officer Provides Recommendation in the Article 32 Hearing – U.S. Government vs. Pfc. Bradley E. Manning

FORT LESLEY J. MCNAIR, DC – The investigating officer assigned to the Article 32 Hearing for Pfc. Bradley E. Manning forwarded his recommendation to Col. Carl R. Coffman, the Special Court Martial Convening Authority, on Jan. 12, 2012. The investigating officer concluded that the charges and specifications are in the proper form and that reasonable grounds exist to believe that the accused committed the offenses alleged. He recommended that the charges be referred to a general court martial.

The Special Court Martial Convening Authority will now review the investigating officer’s report and determine whether the charges should be disposed of at his level or be forwarded to Maj. Gen. Michael S. Linnington, the General Court Martial Convening Authority for disposition at his level.

Pfc. Manning is charged with aiding the enemy; wrongfully causing intelligence to be published on the internet knowing that it is accessible to the enemy; theft of public property or records; transmitting defense information; fraud and related activity in connection with computers; and for violating Army Regulations 25-2 “Information Assurance” and 380-5 “Department of the Army Information Security Program.”

If convicted of all charges, Manning would face a maximum punishment of reduction to the lowest enlisted pay grade, E-1; total forfeiture of all pay and allowances; confinement for life; and a dishonorable discharge.

Media queries may be emailed to the U.S. Army Military District of Washington Public Affairs Office at mediadesk@jfhqncr.northcom.mil
Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 4,004
It seems the US Embassy has some competition when it comes to being the worlds most crap embassy at protecting it's citizens rights.....



Australian Government Continues to Fail in its Duty to Protect the Human Rights of Julian Assange
Youtube - Previous Action at Australian Embassy in London Demanding the Protection of Julian Assange's Human Rights

PLUS Recent Open Letter to Australian Government Demanding they Protect the Human Rights of Julian Assange


1) Jan 10th. 2012 - Australian Government Conitnues to Abandon Australian Citizen Julian Assange to U.S. Driven Persecution
PREVIOUS ACTION AT AUSTRALIAN EMBASSY IN LONDON
http://www.youtube.co...­

YOUTUBE (5 mins 45 secs) Armed Police Arrive for "Australians in London for the Release of Julian Assange" who occupy the Australian embassy, delivering a letter of demands!. australian academics, artists, health workers, anti-war activists, expats & Catholic Workers gather at the australian embassy demanding the immediate release of Julian assange.


2) AUSTRALIAN GOVRNMENT CONTINUES TO ABANDON AUSTRALIAN CITIZEN JULIAN ASSANGE TO U.S. DRIVEN PERSECUTION

Julian Assange: Gillard govt 'unaccountable'
Tom Cowie
Tuesday, 10 January 2012

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange remains frustrated by the lack of assistance from the Australian federal government over his prolonged overseas legal plight, three weeks ahead of his appeal against extradition in the UK Supreme Court.

In an exclusive interview with The Power Index, the platinum-haired whistleblower revealed Foreign Minister Kevin Rudd's office had been in contact with his lawyers in the past month but with "no results".
When asked if he had been receiving adequate assistance from the federal government over his potential extradition from Britain to Sweden, Assange replied: "Of course not".

"Almost no Australian who is involved in trouble overseas receives the assistance they should," he said. "Australia is famous for its lack of assistance to its people who enter into difficulty overseas."
A clearly-discouraged Assange said Prime Minister Julia Gillard, former Attorney-General Robert McClelland and other members of the ALP had "risen above their population and developed network connections with elites in other countries".

"That is their game ... and in doing so they develop a base outside their own country and are no longer political accountable to the people of their country," he told The Power Index.

"[They] have been working their international connections, yes at my expense, but also at the expense of the Australian people."

ARTICLE CONTINUED.........
http://www.thepowerin...­


3) RECENT OPEN LETTER TO KEVIN RUDD AND AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT DEMANDING PROTECTION OF HUMAN RIGHTS OF JULIAN ASSANGE
signed by amongst others Malcolm Fraser, Andrew Denton, Wendy Bacon, John Pilger, Mary Kostakidas

http://images.smh.com...­

The Hon Kevin Rudd MP
Minister for Foreign Affairs
Parliament House ACT 2600

Dear Minister
We write to express our concern about the plight of Julian Assange.
To date, no charges have been laid against Mr Assange by Swedish authorities.
Nonetheless, we understand that should he be sent to Sweden, he will be held on
remand, incommunicado. We note your comments last year about the need for Mr
Assange to receive appropriate consular support. We trust that this consular support is
being provided and will continue.

We are concerned that should Mr Assange be placed in Swedish custody, he will be
subject to the process of "temporary surrender", enabling his removal to the United
States without the appropriate legal processes that accompany normal extradition
cases. We urge you to convey to the Swedish government Australia's expectation that
Mr Assange will be provided with the same rights of appeal and review that any
standard extradition request would entail.

Any prosecution of Mr Assange in the United States will be on the basis of his
activities as a journalist and editor (Mr Assange's status as such has been recently
confirmed by the High Court in England). Such a prosecution will be a serious assault
on freedom of speech and the need for an unfettered, independent media.
Further, the chances of Mr Assange receiving a fair trial in the United States appear
remote. A number of prominent political figures have called for him to be
assassinated, and the Vice-President has called him a "high-tech terrorist". Given the
atmosphere of hostility in relation to Mr Assange, we hold serious concerns about his
safety once in US custody. We note that Mr Assange is an Australian citizen, whose
journalistic activities were undertaken entirely outside of US territory.

Mr Assange is entitled to the best endeavours of his government to ensure he is
treated fairly. He is entitled to expect that his government will not remain silent while
his liberty and safety are placed at risk by a government embarrassed by his
journalism. Australians also expect that their government will speak out against
efforts to silence the media and intimidate those who wish to hold governments to
account.

We ask that you convey clearly to the United States government Australia's concerns
about any effort to manufacture charges against Mr Assange, or to use an unrelated
criminal investigation as the basis for what may effectively be rendition. We also urge
the government to publicly affirm that Mr Assange is welcome to return to Australia
once proceedings against him in Sweden are concluded, and that the government will
fully protect his rights as an Australian citizen once here.

We have copied this letter to your colleague, the Attorney-General.

Yours sincerely
The undersigned

Phillip Adams AO
Adam Bandt MP
Wendy Bacon
Greg Barns
Susan Benn
Senator Bob Brown
Dr Scott Burchill
Julian Burnside QC
Dr Leslie Cannold
Mike Carlton
Professor Noam Chomsky
David Collins
Lieutenant Colonel (ret) Lance Collins,
Australian Intelligence Corps
Eva Cox
Sophie Cunningham
Roy David
Andrew Denton
Senator Richard Di Natale
Peter Fitzsimons
Rt Hon Malcolm Fraser AC CH
Anna Funder
Professor Raimond Gaita
David Gilmour and Polly Samson
Kara Greiner
Senator Sarah Hanson-Young
Liz Humphrys
Professor Sarah Joseph
Bernard Keane
Professor John Keane
Stephen Keim SC
Steve Killelea
Andrew Knight
Mary Kostakidis
Professor Theo van Leeuwen
Ken Loach
Antony Loewenstein
Senator Scott Ludlam
David Lyle
Associate Professor Jake Lynch
Dr Ken Macnab
Professor Robert Manne
Alex Miller
Senator Christine Milne
Alex Mitchell
Reg Mombassa
Gordon Morris
Jane Morris
Julian Morrow
The Hon Alastair Nicholson AO RFD
QC
Nicolé Nolan
Rebecca O’Brien
Elizabeth O’Shea
Michael Pearce SC
John Pilger
Justin Randle
Senator Lee Rhiannon
Guy Rundle
Angus Sampson
Senator Rachel Siewert
Marius Smith
Jeff Sparrow
Professor Stuart Rees AM
Rob Stary
Stephen Thompson
Dr Tad Tietze
Mike Unger
Dale Vince
Brian Walters SC
Rachel Ward
Senator Larissa Waters
Tracy Worcester, Marchioness of
Worcester
Senator Penny Wright
Spencer Zifcak
Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 4,005
vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv



Replies

I fully support the statement...bravo!!
vacyv 1 year ago

Lastly, I will say this - I just hope America becomes a better, more honest country as a result of this. (And less willing to hide their dirty little secrets...Although, something tells me this won't quite happen entirely.)

I hope that we are no longer run by horrid presidents, like George W. Bush - who not only lied to his own country and to his own people, but lied to the rest of the world too! (And because of his selfish and wicked actions - we all must pay the price, unfortunately.)

GhostGal5 1 year ago
Bravo everyone! It takes some very brave human beings to stand up against and speak out against crimes and other atrocities committed by their own governments! (For this, I applaud you!)

However, what I want you to understand is - not all Americans are the same! Not all of them support the imprisonment of Julian Assange and/or the removal of the Wikileaks website! (I, myself, am an American - and highly praise Julian Assange and his team for what they have done: and that is to expose the truth.

GhostGal5 1 year ago
Love all this people!! :D

SuperHardPoop 1 year ago
FREEDOM OF SPEECH!!!

SuperHardPoop 1 year ago 2
Well done peoples. We had a vigil in Bristol in support of Wiki Leaks. Also gave out a load of leaflets in support of Bradley Manning. The struggle continues.

nicklearseg 1 year ago
what does aus gov and PM do?how they protect own citizen,his human rights and freedom of speach???

democracys real face?
vychodny 1 year ago




Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 4,025
Wikileaks : Big new Rolling Stone interview between Julian Assange & Michael Hastings http://t.co/fQjSQFbb...­ 11 mins ago

The Military Tribunal of Bradley Manning, the 24-year-old Army private alleged to have provided the War Diaries/ Collateral Murder Tapes to WikiLeaks. Assange has two lawyers representing him in the Maryland courtroom, and his name has been mentioned virtually every day during the initial hearing. The government's strategy, it has become clear, is to pressure Manning to implicate Assange in espionage – to present his work at WikiLeaks as the act of a spy, not a journalist.



Julian Assange: The Rolling Stone Interview
Under house arrest in England, the WikiLeaks founder opens up about his battle with the 'Times,' his stint in solitary and the future of journalism
http://www.rollingsto...­

By Michael Hastings
January 18, 2012 8:00 AM ET

It's a few days before Christmas, and Julian Assange has just finished moving to a new hide-out deep in the English countryside. The two-bedroom house, on loan from a WikiLeaks supporter, is comfortable enough, with a big stone fireplace and a porch out back, but it's not as grand as the country estate where he spent the past 363 days under house arrest, waiting for a British court to decide whether he will be extradited to Sweden to face allegations that he sexually molested two women he was briefly involved with in August 2010.

Assange sits on a tattered couch, wearing a wool sweater, dark pants and an electronic manacle around his right ankle, visible only when he crosses his legs. At 40, the WikiLeaks founder comes across more like an embattled rebel commander than a hacker or journalist. He's become better at handling the media – more willing to answer questions than he used to be, less likely to storm off during interviews – but the protracted legal battle has left him isolated, broke and vulnerable. Assange recently spoke to someone he calls a Western "intelligence source," and he asked the official about his fate. Will he ever be a free man again, allowed to return to his native Australia, to come and go as he pleases? "He told me I was fucked," Assange says.

"Are you fucked?" I ask.

Assange pauses and looks out the window. The house is surrounded by rolling fields and quiet woods, but they offer him little in the way of escape. The British Supreme Court will hear his extradition appeal on February 1st – but even if he wins, he will likely still remain a wanted man. Interpol has issued a so-called "red notice" for his arrest on behalf of Swedish authorities for questioning in "connection with a number of sexual offenses" – Qaddafi, accused of war crimes, earned only an "orange notice" – and the U.S. government has branded him a "high-tech terrorist," unleashing a massive and unprecedented investigation designed to depict Assange's journalism as a form of international espionage. Ever since November 2010, when WikiLeaks embarrassed and infuriated the world's governments with the release of what became known as Cablegate, some 250,000 classified diplomatic cables from more than 150 countries, the group's supporters have found themselves detained at airports, subpoenaed to testify before a grand jury, and ordered to turn over their Twitter accounts and e-mails to authorities.

Assange was always deeply engaged with the world – and always getting into trouble. Born in a small town in Queensland, he spent much of his youth traveling around Australia with his mother and stepfather, who ran a theater company. As a teenager, he discovered computers – his first was a Commodore 64 – and became one of the world's foremost hackers, going by the name Mendax, Latin for "nobly untruthful." After breaking into systems at NASA and the Pentagon when he was 16, he was busted on 25 counts of hacking, which prodded him to go straight. But as he traveled the world, working as a tech consultant through much of the 1990s, he continued putting his computer skills to use ensuring freedom of information – a necessary condition, he believes, for democratic self-rule.

"From the glory days of American radicalism, which was the American Revolution, I think that Madison's view on government is still unequaled," he tells me during the three days I spend with him as he settles into his new location in England. "That people determined to be in a democracy, to be their own governments, must have the power that knowledge will bring – because knowledge will always rule ignorance. You can either be informed and your own rulers, or you can be ignorant and have someone else, who is not ignorant, rule over you. The question is, where has the United States betrayed Madison and Jefferson, betrayed these basic values on how you keep a democracy? I think that the U.S. military-industrial complex and the majority of politicians in Congress have betrayed those values."

In 2006, Assange founded WikiLeaks, a group of hackers and activists that has been dubbed the first "stateless news organization." The goal, from the start, was to operate beyond the reach of the law, get their hands on vital documents being censored by governments and corporations, and make them available to the public. After a series of initial successes – publishing leaks about Iceland, Kenya and even a Pentagon document warning of WikiLeaks – Assange rocked the U.S. military in April 2010 with the release of "Collateral Murder," a video that revealed an American helicopter in Iraq opening fire on unarmed civilians, killing two journalists and several others. He quickly followed up with the release of hundreds of thousands of classified files related to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, creating an international firestorm. But soon after he began releasing the diplomatic cables, which were widely credited with helping to spark the Arab Spring, he was detained and imprisoned after spending a week with two female supporters in Stockholm, entangling him in a yearlong legal battle to win his own freedom.

Assange agreed to a lengthy interview at his new home, on the condition that the location be kept secret, along with the identities of the core WikiLeaks staffers who have stuck by him since he ran into trouble in Sweden. Though he continues to run the group from captivity, working on what he calls a new set of scoops concerning the private-surveillance industry, the media furor over his personal life has turned him into a pariah among many former supporters, making it difficult for WikiLeaks to raise money. He's been called a rapist, an enemy combatant, and an agent of both Mossad and the CIA. His two most prominent collaborators – The New York Times and The Guardian – have repeatedly tarred him as a sexual deviant with bad personal hygiene, while continuing to happily sell books and movie rights about his exploits. His own personality has also proved divisive: He's charming, brilliant and uncompromising, but he has inspired intense hatred among former colleagues, who portray him as a megalomaniac whose ego has undermined the cause.
Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 4,026
Wikileaks : Big new Rolling Stone interview between Julian Assange & Michael Hastings http://t.co/fQjSQFbb...­ 11 mins ago

The Military Tribunal of Bradley Manning, the 24-year-old Army private alleged to have provided the War Diaries/ Collateral Murder Tapes to WikiLeaks. Assange has two lawyers representing him in the Maryland courtroom, and his name has been mentioned virtually every day during the initial hearing. The government's strategy, it has become clear, is to pressure Manning to implicate Assange in espionage – to present his work at WikiLeaks as the act of a spy, not a journalist.



Julian Assange: The Rolling Stone Interview
Under house arrest in England, the WikiLeaks founder opens up about his battle with the 'Times,' his stint in solitary and the future of journalism
http://www.rollingsto...­

By Michael Hastings
January 18, 2012 8:00 AM ET

Con...

When I arrive for my last day with Assange, I'm 45 minutes early. Most of his staff have gone home for the holidays, and he's alone in the house with only his personal assistant to keep him company. Assange is huddled over a laptop in the dining room he has turned into his office, monitoring what has become his sole focus over the past few days: the trial of Bradley Manning, the 24-year-old Army private alleged to have provided the diplomatic cables to WikiLeaks. Assange has two lawyers representing him in the Maryland courtroom, and his name has been mentioned virtually every day during the initial hearing. The government's strategy, it has become clear, is to pressure Manning to implicate Assange in espionage – to present his work at WikiLeaks as the act of a spy, not a journalist.

When Assange comes into the living room and sits on the couch, a small Jack Russell terrier jumps up onto his lap and remains there for most of the next five hours. "You use two recorders," Assange says, looking at the digital recorders I've put down on the small coffee table. "I usually use three." But as soon as we start the interview, the phone rings. It's Daniel Ellsberg, the man who leaked the Pentagon Papers, who had attended the Manning trial with Assange's lawyers. Ellsberg is in a car driving back to Washington, D.C. "I can hear you," Assange shouts, ducking into the dining room. "Can you hear me?"

Five minutes later he returns, energized by his talk with America's most famous whistle-blower. "Where were we?" he says. His assistant brings in two cups of coffee, and the interview begins.

Julian Assange: The Rolling Stone Interview
http://www.rollingsto...­

Con...

Why is WikiLeaks so focused on defending Bradley Manning?
Manning is alleged to be one of our sources, regardless of whether those allegations are true or not. He has now sat in various U.S. military prisons for the past 600 days as a result of what we published. So we feel that we owe him a duty of care. I have heard from people close to his defense that it is their view that the abuse of him was in order to get him to testify against us.

I understand that you believe the Justice Department has been attending the hearing, to see how it impacts their investigation into WikiLeaks.
There are three gray-faced men who always show up. They're so furtive: They refuse to identify themselves, or to even make eye contact with our lawyers. They go into the classified hearings when everyone else is kicked out. One of them, we have discovered, is a prosecutor for the Department of Justice on the WikiLeaks investigation. I believe they are there to make sure that the government, in presenting its case against Manning, did not reveal information that was critical to its investigation into us.

In diplomatic cables, the investigation into WikiLeaks by the U.S. government has been called "unprecedented both in its scale and nature." How much do you know about it?
Since last September, a secret grand jury was empaneled in Alexandria, Virginia. There is no defense counsel. There are four prosecutors, according to witnesses who have been forced to testify before the grand jury. The jury itself is taken from the local area, and Alexandria has the highest density of government and military contractors anywhere in the United States. It is a place where the U.S. government chooses to conduct all national-security grand juries and trials because of that makeup of the jury pool.

The investigation has involved most of the U.S. intelligence apparatus, the FBI, the State Department, the United States Army. It has subpoenaed the records of most of my U.S. friends or acquaintances. Under what are called Patriot Act production orders, the government has also asked for their Twitter records, Google accounts and individual ISPs. The laws which they're working toward an indictment on are the Espionage Act of 1917 and the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act of 1986.

And they're going after Manning, who is facing a life sentence, to get him to say that you're a spy?
To be another chess piece on the board in the attack on us. The U.S. government is trying to redefine what have been long-accepted journalistic methods. If the Pentagon is to have its way, it will be the end of national-security journalism in the United States.

How so?
They're trying to interpret the Espionage Act to say that any two-way communication with a source is a collaboration with a source, and is therefore a conspiracy to commit espionage where classified information is involved. The Pentagon, in fact, issued a public demand to us that we not only destroy everything we had ever published or were ever going to publish in relation to the U.S. government, but that we also stop "soliciting" information from U.S. government employees. The Espionage Act itself does not mention solicitation, but they're trying to create a new legal precedent that includes a journalist simply asking a source to communicate information. A few years ago, for example, the CIA destroyed its waterboarding interrogation videos. In the Manning hearing, prosecutors described how we had a most-wanted list, which included those interrogation videos if they still existed.

The WikiLeaks site had a "most-wanted" list of stories you were eager to get?
This list was not put together by us. We asked for nominations from human rights activists and journalists from around the world of the information they most wanted, and we put that on a list. The prosecution in the Manning hearing has been attempting to use that list as evidence of our solicitation of information that is likely to be classified, and therefore our complicity in espionage, if we received such information.

From a journalist's perspective, a list like that would be the equivalent of a normal editorial meeting where you list the crown jewels of stories you'd love to get.
Exactly.
Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 4,027
Wikileaks : Big new Rolling Stone interview between Julian Assange & Michael Hastings http://t.co/fQjSQFbb...­ 11 mins ago

The Military Tribunal of Bradley Manning, the 24-year-old Army private alleged to have provided the War Diaries/ Collateral Murder Tapes to WikiLeaks. Assange has two lawyers representing him in the Maryland courtroom, and his name has been mentioned virtually every day during the initial hearing. The government's strategy, it has become clear, is to pressure Manning to implicate Assange in espionage – to present his work at WikiLeaks as the act of a spy, not a journalist.



Julian Assange: The Rolling Stone Interview
Under house arrest in England, the WikiLeaks founder opens up about his battle with the 'Times,' his stint in solitary and the future of journalism
http://www.rollingsto...­

By Michael Hastings
January 18, 2012 8:00 AM ET

Con...

When I arrive for my last day with Assange, I'm 45 minutes early. Most of his staff have gone home for the holidays, and he's alone in the house with only his personal assistant to keep him company. Assange is huddled over a laptop in the dining room he has turned into his office, monitoring what has become his sole focus over the past few days: the trial of Bradley Manning, the 24-year-old Army private alleged to have provided the diplomatic cables to WikiLeaks. Assange has two lawyers representing him in the Maryland courtroom, and his name has been mentioned virtually every day during the initial hearing. The government's strategy, it has become clear, is to pressure Manning to implicate Assange in espionage – to present his work at WikiLeaks as the act of a spy, not a journalist.

When Assange comes into the living room and sits on the couch, a small Jack Russell terrier jumps up onto his lap and remains there for most of the next five hours. "You use two recorders," Assange says, looking at the digital recorders I've put down on the small coffee table. "I usually use three." But as soon as we start the interview, the phone rings. It's Daniel Ellsberg, the man who leaked the Pentagon Papers, who had attended the Manning trial with Assange's lawyers. Ellsberg is in a car driving back to Washington, D.C. "I can hear you," Assange shouts, ducking into the dining room. "Can you hear me?"

Five minutes later he returns, energized by his talk with America's most famous whistle-blower. "Where were we?" he says. His assistant brings in two cups of coffee, and the interview begins.

Julian Assange: The Rolling Stone Interview
http://www.rollingsto...­

Con...

So if you're going to jail, then Bob Woodward's going to jail.
Individuals like Sy Hersh and Dana Priest and Bob Woodward constantly say to their sources, "Hey, what about this, have you heard anything about it? I heard that there's been an airstrike in Afghanistan that's killed a bunch of civilians – do you have any more details, and can you prove them with paper?" And all those would be defined as conspiracy to commit espionage under the Pentagon's interpretation.

Given the broader implications, it's surprising that you haven't received much support from what you call the "Anglo-American press." In fact, The New York Times and The Guardian, both of which collaborated with you on releasing some of the documents, have done their best to distance themselves from you.
The Times ran in the face of fire; it abandoned us once the heat started from the U.S. administration. In doing so, it also abandoned itself, and it abandoned all journalists working on national-security journalism in the United States.

What the Times was concerned about is being swept up in the government's investigation. If Bradley Manning or another U.S. government employee had collaborated with us to provide us with classified information, and we, in turn, collaborated with the Times to provide it to the world, then the argument would run that the Times had been involved in a conspiracy with us to commit espionage. This is something that the Times was deeply concerned about. It said to us that we should never refer to the Times as a partner – that was their legal advice.

Bill Keller, the former editor of the Times, wrote a widely read and lengthy piece that attacked you personally. In it, he says four or five times that "WikiLeaks is a source, they are not a partner."
Keller was trying to save his own skin from the espionage investigation in two ways. First, on a legal technicality, by claiming that there was no collaboration, only a passive relationship between journalist and source. And second, by distancing themselves from us by attacking me personally, using all the standard tabloid character-assassination attacks. Many journalists at the Times have approached me to say how embarrassed they were at the lowering of the tone by doing that. Keller also came out and said how pleased the White House was with them that they had not run WikiLeaks material the White House had asked them not to. It is one thing to do that, and it's another thing to proudly proclaim it. Why did Keller feel the need to tell the world how pleased the White House was with him? For the same reason he felt the need to describe how dirty my socks were. It is not to convey the facts – rather, it is to convey a political alignment. You heard this explicitly: Keller said, "Julian Assange may or may not be a journalist, but he's not my kind of journalist." My immediate reaction is, "Thank God I'm not Bill Keller's type of journalist."

The publishing mindset at WikiLeaks, it's fair to say, is radically different than that of the mainstream press. Where a newspaper that received 500,000 documents might release 20, you released all of them.
Cablegate is 3,000 volumes of material. It is the greatest intellectual treasure to have entered into the public record in modern times. The Times released just over 100 cables. There are over 251,000 cables in Cablegate. So our approach is quite different to that of the Times. The Times in its security arrangements was only concerned with preventing The Washington Post from finding out what it was doing. But it told the U.S. government every single cable that it wanted to publish.

And in return, the Times has basically portrayed you as a pariah, despite being responsible for getting them all this incredible material, as well as setting up an innovative organization to gather and process all the leaked data.
Absolutely no honor or gratitude. I don't wish to make light of the difficulties the Times faces in working in the United States, but I do think it could have managed those difficulties in a more honorable way.
Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 4,028
Wikileaks : Big new Rolling Stone interview between Julian Assange & Michael Hastings http://t.co/fQjSQFbb...­ 11 mins ago

The Military Tribunal of Bradley Manning, the 24-year-old Army private alleged to have provided the War Diaries/ Collateral Murder Tapes to WikiLeaks. Assange has two lawyers representing him in the Maryland courtroom, and his name has been mentioned virtually every day during the initial hearing. The government's strategy, it has become clear, is to pressure Manning to implicate Assange in espionage – to present his work at WikiLeaks as the act of a spy, not a journalist.



Julian Assange: The Rolling Stone Interview
Under house arrest in England, the WikiLeaks founder opens up about his battle with the 'Times,' his stint in solitary and the future of journalism
http://www.rollingsto...­

By Michael Hastings
January 18, 2012 8:00 AM ET

Con...

When I arrive for my last day with Assange, I'm 45 minutes early. Most of his staff have gone home for the holidays, and he's alone in the house with only his personal assistant to keep him company. Assange is huddled over a laptop in the dining room he has turned into his office, monitoring what has become his sole focus over the past few days: the trial of Bradley Manning, the 24-year-old Army private alleged to have provided the diplomatic cables to WikiLeaks. Assange has two lawyers representing him in the Maryland courtroom, and his name has been mentioned virtually every day during the initial hearing. The government's strategy, it has become clear, is to pressure Manning to implicate Assange in espionage – to present his work at WikiLeaks as the act of a spy, not a journalist.

When Assange comes into the living room and sits on the couch, a small Jack Russell terrier jumps up onto his lap and remains there for most of the next five hours. "You use two recorders," Assange says, looking at the digital recorders I've put down on the small coffee table. "I usually use three." But as soon as we start the interview, the phone rings. It's Daniel Ellsberg, the man who leaked the Pentagon Papers, who had attended the Manning trial with Assange's lawyers. Ellsberg is in a car driving back to Washington, D.C. "I can hear you," Assange shouts, ducking into the dining room. "Can you hear me?"

Five minutes later he returns, energized by his talk with America's most famous whistle-blower. "Where were we?" he says. His assistant brings in two cups of coffee, and the interview begins.

Julian Assange: The Rolling Stone Interview
http://www.rollingsto...­

Con...

After the Afghan war diaries came out, the Times ran a hostile profile of Bradley Manning that psychologized him into being a sad, mad fag, and can only be described as a tabloid piece. Then, when we published the Iraq War logs, we discovered details about the deaths of more than 100,000 civilians, and details of the torture of more than 1,000 people. Every other paper ran the story. The United Nations and a number of countries investigated the allegations, and even the U.S. military's own internal documents referred to the abuses as torture. Yet the Times refused to use the word "torture" at all. Instead, they ran a sleazy hit piece against me on the front page that was factually inaccurate. It said, for instance, that I had been charged with sexual abuse when I had not, and that 12 people had defected from our organization when we had suspended one. I don't mind taking a hit, but it must be factually accurate. For the Times to descend into a tabloid hit piece on the front page when we had just exposed the deaths of more than 100,000 civilians was not commensurate.
Julian Assange Really Likes His Fans
The Atlantic Wire‎ - 2 hours ago
http://www.theatlanti...­
http://www.guardian.c...­

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange's new profile in Rolling Stone makes one thing very clear: Assange very much likes the people who like him and he'll remind you there are still plenty of them. The silver-haired provocateur sat down with Michael Hasting's for a five-hour Q&A (it's available online today), in which conversation zooms from Bradley Manning to Assange's high school days to Sarah Palin "calling for his assassination". But one thing that Assange makes very clear throughout is that he's very well liked and that he isn't ambushed by haters (as one would think with calls for his assassination), but rather by his adoring, very supportive fans. What caught our attention is that his groupies fans, admirers, supporters, advocates--whatever you call them--are even better than the press when it comes to hunting this elusive man down:

Julian Assange: The Rolling Stone Interview
http://www.rollingsto...­

"Collateral Murder" – the video you released in April 2010 showing a U.S. helicopter gunship firing on a group of Iraqi civilians, including two Reuters journalists and two children – was the first scoop that got you major media attention. You learned that The Washington Post actually had the video and had been sitting on it.
A Post reporter named David Finkel had the video. We had sources who explained that he had even shown them the video in his home. Yet he concealed it.

Finkel's response was, "There were a lot of bad days in Iraq."
He had been embedded with ground troops in that area for some nine months on the ground. He had clearly developed too close an affinity for the people he was embedded with and came out essentially campaigning on their behalf after the release of the video.

Were those kinds of failings by the mainstream media what inspired you to start WikiLeaks?
The things that informed me most were my experiences in fighting for freedom of the press, freedom to communicate knowledge – which, in the end, is freedom from ignorance. Secondly, my experiences in understanding how the military-intelligence complex works at a practical level. I saw that publishing all over the world was deeply constrained by self-censorship, economics and political censorship, while the military-industrial complex was growing at a tremendous rate, and the amount of information that it was collecting about all of us vastly exceeded the public imagination.

You first registered the domain name for leaks.org back in 1999, when you were working on encryption technology for dissidents and human rights workers. That was before the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon enabled the government to dramatically expand its power to keep information secret and spy on its own citizens.
Yes. On September 11th, I was on the phone with a friend, discussing encryption algorithms. Very quickly, within an hour, I saw what the counter-reaction would be, and that all the proposals that the military-industrial complex had to spy on everyone, to remove probable cause, to increase its funding, would be rushed forward again. That's precisely what happened.
Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 4,029
Wikileaks : Big new Rolling Stone interview between Julian Assange & Michael Hastings http://t.co/fQjSQFbb...­ 11 mins ago

The Military Tribunal of Bradley Manning, the 24-year-old Army private alleged to have provided the War Diaries/ Collateral Murder Tapes to WikiLeaks. Assange has two lawyers representing him in the Maryland courtroom, and his name has been mentioned virtually every day during the initial hearing. The government's strategy, it has become clear, is to pressure Manning to implicate Assange in espionage – to present his work at WikiLeaks as the act of a spy, not a journalist.



Julian Assange: The Rolling Stone Interview
Under house arrest in England, the WikiLeaks founder opens up about his battle with the 'Times,' his stint in solitary and the future of journalism
http://www.rollingsto...­

By Michael Hastings
January 18, 2012 8:00 AM ET

Con...

When I arrive for my last day with Assange, I'm 45 minutes early. Most of his staff have gone home for the holidays, and he's alone in the house with only his personal assistant to keep him company. Assange is huddled over a laptop in the dining room he has turned into his office, monitoring what has become his sole focus over the past few days: the trial of Bradley Manning, the 24-year-old Army private alleged to have provided the diplomatic cables to WikiLeaks. Assange has two lawyers representing him in the Maryland courtroom, and his name has been mentioned virtually every day during the initial hearing. The government's strategy, it has become clear, is to pressure Manning to implicate Assange in espionage – to present his work at WikiLeaks as the act of a spy, not a journalist.

When Assange comes into the living room and sits on the couch, a small Jack Russell terrier jumps up onto his lap and remains there for most of the next five hours. "You use two recorders," Assange says, looking at the digital recorders I've put down on the small coffee table. "I usually use three." But as soon as we start the interview, the phone rings. It's Daniel Ellsberg, the man who leaked the Pentagon Papers, who had attended the Manning trial with Assange's lawyers. Ellsberg is in a car driving back to Washington, D.C. "I can hear you," Assange shouts, ducking into the dining room. "Can you hear me?"

Five minutes later he returns, energized by his talk with America's most famous whistle-blower. "Where were we?" he says. His assistant brings in two cups of coffee, and the interview begins.

Julian Assange: The Rolling Stone Interview
http://www.rollingsto...­

Con...

Then, two years later, the U.S. invaded Iraq.
The creation of WikiLeaks was, in part, a response to Iraq. There were a number of whistle-blowers who came out in relation to Iraq, and it was clear to me that what the world was missing in the days of Iraq propaganda was a way for inside sources who knew what was really going on to communicate that information to the public. Quite a few who did ended up in very dire circumstances, including David Kelly, the British scientist who either committed suicide or was murdered over his revelations about weapons of mass destruction. The Iraq War was the biggest issue for people of my generation in the West. It was also the clearest case, in my living memory, of media manipulation and the creation of a war through ignorance.

Before the scoops that centered on the U.S. government – the logs and cables regarding Afghanistan and Iraq – your focus was on other countries.
Initially we thought that our greatest role would be in China and some former Soviet states and in Africa. We did have early successes in Africa. I lived in Kenya in 2007, and we were able to source a document that exposed billions of dollars of corruption by the former president Daniel arap Moi and his cronies. The evidence ended up swinging the vote by 10 percent and changing the Kenyan election. But Moi's corruption didn't exist in Kenya alone. The money looted from Kenya was deposited into London banks, properties and businesses, into New York properties. There is no large-scale corruption in the developing world without Western corruption. That was an important lesson to me.

Another important lesson was that, very quickly, we started receiving information from what we presumed to be disaffected U.S. government employees about the actions of the U.S. military. The United States has historically been a relatively open society. But within the United States, there is a shadow state, and that is the U.S. military, which, as of September, held 4.3 million security clearances. That is equal to the population of New Zealand. That is a closed, totalitarian society that gathers and stores more information than any other society in the world.

WikiLeaks has been credited, even by its critics, with fueling the Arab Spring, and even Occupy Wall Street. Was this your plan? Did you imagine you could have this kind of impact?
We planned for most of what has occurred over the past 12 months. It is fair to say we're unexpectedly delighted that those plans came to fruition.

In relation to the Arab Spring, the way I looked at this back in October of 2010 is that the power structures in the Middle East are interdependent, they support each other. If we could release enough information fast enough about many of these powerful individuals and organizations, their ability to support each other would be diminished. They'd have to fight their own local battles – they'd have to turn inward to deal with the domestic political fallout from the information. And therefore they would not have the resources to prop up surrounding countries.

Would you like to see those regimes fall? What's the end result you're looking for?
When you shake something up, you have a chance to rebuild. But we're not interested in shaking something up just for the hell of it. I believe that if we look at what makes a civilization civilized, it is people understanding what is really going on. When Gutenberg invented the printing press, the end result was that people who knew something of what was going on could convey that information to others. And as a result of the Internet, we are now living in a time where it's a lot easier to convey what we know about our corner of the world and share it with others.

Do you think governments should be allowed to keep some secrets?
This is a question that is much more interesting than the answer. In some cases – tracking down organized crime, say – government officials have an obligation to keep their investigations secret at the moment that they are performing them. Similarly, a doctor has an obligation to keep information about your medical records secret under most circumstances. This is a question about obligations. It is absurd to suggest that simply because a police officer may have the obligation to keep secret certain information relating to an investigation, that the entire world also must be subject to a coercive force.
Wilber W.
WilberWebb
Group Organizer
London, GB
Post #: 4,078
Exclusive TV series hosted by Julian Assange to premiere on RT in March



Americans have steadily been watching less TV over the last 30 years


Powered by mvnForum

Our Sponsors

People in this
Meetup are also in:

Sign up

Meetup members, Log in

By clicking "Sign up" or "Sign up using Facebook", you confirm that you accept our Terms of Service & Privacy Policy