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Special film of Waiting for Godot at National Gallery, dinner after

  • Jan 8, 2012 · 3:00 PM
  • East Wing, National Gallery of Art

Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett is one of the most famous plays in history.  It ushered in a new era of theater that would include Harold Pinter, Tom Stoppard, David Mamet and many many others.  This is a famed teleplay from the short-lived but celebrated early 1960s WNTA-TV series Play of the Week, features Zero Mostel as Estragon and Burgess Meredith as Vladimir. "Godot and Play of the Week exemplify the potential heights the small screen could reach as a legitimate venue for meaningful and challenging dramatic arts"—Mark Quigley. (Alan Schneider, 1961, DigiBeta, 102 minutes) From the UCLA Film and Television Archive

This is one of the only screen adaptations of Godot, so if you've never seen it, you're in for a treat.  We'll meet at 3 so we can assess if we need to be in line early. Film starts at 4:30.  If not, we can go get a snack at the cafeteria or walk through some of the wonderful rooms there.  Afterwards, reservations have been made at Teaism for dinner and discussion.

There will also be a short film preceding Godot. Film, Samuel Beckett's only screenplay (the writer supervised the production as well), is a 20-minute, almost silent short, at once an abstraction and a deeply moving meditation. An aging and weary Buster Keaton engages in a kind of face-off with the camera lens and, by extension, with the world itself. Film's noted cinematographer was Boris Kaufman. (Alan Schneider, 1965, 35 mm, 20 minutes) Preservation funded by The Film Foundation and administered by the National Film Preservation Foundation

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  • Barbara

    It was a very nice experience. I'm looking forward to the next.

    January 9, 2012

  • A former member
    A former member

    I had a great time meeting everyone and discussing the film over dinner; it was a truly refreshing experience. I had no idea what to expect so my feelings about the film don't really count for much towards my rating but for what it's worth I am glad I got to see something that I wouldn't necessarily chosen on my own.

    January 9, 2012

  • David

    Two unanswered questions came up in our discussion of "Waiting for Godot": (1) Was Samuel Beckett an atheist? Answer (per Wikipedia): As a witness in a lawsuit, Beckett was asked "whether he was a Christian, Jew or atheist. Beckett replied, 'None of the three.'" (2) Why do the four adults in "Waiting for Godot" wear bowler-type hats? Answer: in the printed editions of the play, in a footnote, Beckett specified "All four wear bowlers."

    January 9, 2012

  • David

    Two unanswered questions came up in our discussion of "Waiting for Godot": (1) Was Samuel Beckett an atheist? Answer (per Wikipedia): As a witness in a lawsuit, Beckett was asked "whether he was a Christian, Jew or atheist. Beckett replied, 'None of the three.'" (2) Why do the four adults in "Waiting for Godot" wear bowler-type hats? Answer: in the printed editions of the play, in a footnote, Beckett specified "All four wear bowlers."

    January 9, 2012

  • Mary Frances K.

    While this has merit, it was a long play. I should have read about it before I came. I got lost in the middle. I agree that Godot could have been God, given the many biblical references made during the play.
    I had to go home and could not go to the dinner.

    January 9, 2012

  • Jackie

    Thank you.

    January 8, 2012

  • Ronn

    Yes, I'll have a sign and our group should be easy to spot. We'll stand outside the auditorium from 3 to 3:15 and then decide if we need to get in line or can just wander about a bit in the galleries.

    January 8, 2012

  • Jackie

    Does anyone know if the organizer will carry a sign or wear a unique scarf/sweater so that they are easy to spot in a crowd?

    January 8, 2012

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