NYC ATHEISTS JUNE BRUNCH & SPEAKER

  • June 10, 2012 · 12:00 PM
  • PRESS BOX

Dr. David Orenstein


How to Live the Atheist Life to the Fullest

 

‘Freeing Ourselves from Religion is Liberation!’

 

Admittedly, it’s sometimes hard to be an Atheist.  We are discriminated against in our mostly religious society, we are denied representation in government, we are considered immoral, we often have to hide the fact, on our jobs, that we are Atheists.  We are outsiders in most small to middle-sized towns across America, often shunned, disregarded and disapproved of.  And that’s not even counting the vituperation and violence that erupts when we “come out” or do a public action!

 

So it’s hard to remember, sometimes, how GREAT it is to be an Atheist. And it’s hard to know how to live the Atheist life to the fullest, fully convinced that it is indeed wonderful to be a nonbeliever--freeing, honest and pure as breathing in the fresh salt air on a beach.


“To many believers, Atheists come off as angry and unhappy,” says Dr. David Orenstein, who will be the speaker at Sunday’s NYC Atheist Brunch. “Sure, we get angry once in a while at the tenacity of something as irrational as an invisible god. But that’s not our definitive characteristic.


“We sometimes forget,” he adds, “that Atheism is a form of liberation. And that this liberation can provide nonbelievers with daily joy in how we see the world.”


A Narrow Escape


That joy is especially poignant to Dr. Orenstein because he almost didn’t live to experience it. As a preteen, rheumatic fever left him with a damaged mitral and aortic valve. At 17, he underwent open-heart surgery to replace the aortic valve. In 1987, the replaced valve was found to be calcified and he underwent a second open-heart surgery to replace it with a new non-organic valve.


“Each time I went under the knife I neither prayed nor pleaded with god to spare me. Frankly, I was more concerned with the heart doctor’s surgical experience. than with divine intervention or salvation,” says Dr. Orenstein


Today, Dr. Orenstein is healthy, hardy and enjoying life to the fullest.  On Sunday, at NYCA’s monthly Brunch, he intends to share his joy with his fellow Atheists, tell us why and how he became an Atheist and why he feels that Atheism is, for everybody, the way of life that allows for more happiness, productivity, progress and satisfaction.


The Honesty of Atheism Is Nurturing


The college professor--he now teaches anthropology at a small New Jersey college--will tell us how to live each day knowing that you will never live it again--and that’s OK. He points out that the honesty of Atheism is far more nurturing than any religious system that fabricates a false afterlife.


Join us on Sunday to find out why you should be glad you are a nonbeliever, why Atheism is the most honest and satisfying way to live and how your immortality can come not from false gods but from doing your best on this planet during your time on it!


EVENT SUMMARY


WHAT:   “HOW TO LIVE THE ATHEIST LIFE TO THE FULLEST,” a talk by Dr. David Orenstein, professor of Anthropology at Warren County Community College.


WHEN:    SUNDAY, JUNE 10, 2012 AT 12 NOON


WHERE:  THE PRESS BOX - 932 Second Ave (bet. 49 & 50th) - Second Floor


COST:     The Brunch is $20, which includes a selection of buffet entrees, salad, soft drink, coffee, tax and tip. We are avid fans of the Eggs Benedict.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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  • Jane E.

    David was lovable; we all wanted to hug him afterwards. David has completely convinced me that being an Atheist is the highest calling. Sharing the Atheist community with people as wonderful , as honest, as giving as David makes it worth while.

    June 11, 2012

  • A former member
    A former member

    awesome!

    June 11, 2012

  • Lawrence S.

    As always it was fine but the turnout was less than usual. David Orenstein's speech defending Atheism revealed his point of view quite well.

    June 11, 2012

  • A former member
    A former member

    And He shall hate the shoes not the people who love them.

    June 9, 2012

  • Jane E.

    Not if you are a shoe fetishist.

    June 8, 2012

  • A former member
    A former member

    Sorry to hear about the KKK call. Unpleasant but a reminder of the mentality of the creeps out there. Did you see the subway ad that says something like "New York, tolerant of your beliefs, critical of your shoes." Another reason to live here.

    June 8, 2012

  • Sarah - N.

    Funny enough, I am a Libertarian. But not in the new hipster "i hate and distrust all authority" definition. More the secular, "government is meant to protect us not dictate our daily lives" definition. But I digress, life WOULD be easier in a secular state. As for David's talk, I do this often: enjoying the freedom that being atheist affords me. Whether it's sleeping in on Sunday, or being friends with whoever I choose. Self-crafted shackles are the easiest to break! :D

    June 8, 2012

  • Jane E.

    What's this got to do with Dr. David Orenstein's talk at the Sunday Brunch? Only that I think he may be giving us a hard row to hoe.Yes, there are lots of pluses to being an Atheist, freedomwise, but how do we contend with the persistent persecution, subtle and not so subtle, by religionists?

    June 8, 2012

  • Jane E.

    Sarah, this just proves to me that religious people don't have a clue about what Atheists are all about and confuse us with being against democratic ideas. We love our democratic government! We just don't want it run by any religion. Including Mormonism.

    June 8, 2012

  • Jane E.

    Those who think you are an anarchist may be confusing Atheists with Libertarians. The dictionary defines "anarchism" as 1. The theory that all forms of government are oppressive & undesirable, and should be abolished; 2. Active resistance and terrorism against the state as used by anarchists and 3. Rejection of all forms of coercive control and authority. I don't know any genuine Atheist who feels that ALL forms of government are undesirable--except for utopian Libertarians--and they are few.

    June 8, 2012

  • Sarah - N.

    True enough Joey. Our primary attention should be on Separation of Church and State legislation. As the rest will all follow suit once people find their lives are no longer controlled by the religious opinions of others, it makes being an open atheist that much easier. As things stand now in this country, being an atheist is seen as intolerant and judgmental of theists and a danger to society. I spend great amounts of time each week trying to just convince people that I am not an anarchist.

    June 8, 2012

  • Jane E.

    Well, maybe the joys of Atheism do top the persecution we get. Still, I wish David could convince the Ku Klux Klan that it is liberating freedom to throw off the sheets. And by the way, Klansmen, stop leaving mean threatening messages on women's answering machines!

    June 7, 2012

  • Jane E.

    Well, I didn't exactly "engage" with the Ku Klux Klan guy...his message was on my telephone answering machine. These people go after us. It's scary. I don't know if David can convince me that the Joys of Atheism can overcome the scariness of all those so-called Christians out there who use unholy methods to try to get us to conform.

    June 7, 2012

  • A former member
    A former member

    There's nothing to gain by engaging with haters and religious extremists. And praying that the world were a more humane and rational place gets you nowhere. The most effective thing Atheists can do is to support the secular movement and to be politically active in pursuing the separation of church and state promised by the Founders in the Constitution. David is an Atheist who is rational, rock solid in his commitment and worth listening to. And it wouldn't hurt to become a dues paying member.

    June 6, 2012

  • Jane E.

    Have you been discriminated against because you are an Atheist? I just got a rather threatening phone call from a Ku Klux Klansman. I wrote about it in the NYCA newsletter.

    June 6, 2012

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