Re: [betaNYC] Need some help from the crowd!

From: Christopher E.
Sent on: Friday, August 1, 2014 10:31 AM
Chris, 

Three big differences (in order of importance) between NYC and LAC:
1. LA County picks up much of the tab. (In New York, the counties are NYC (each borough is also a county), so NYC's budget will naturally be higher. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_counties_in_New_York
2. Millions of people who don't count toward NYC's official 8.4 million commute into the city every day for work. Those people don't live here but they increase the demand for city services (sanitation, police, fire, transit, etc) upward nonetheless.
3. Same goes for tourists, and New York gets a ton of them. 

Chris 



On Fri, Aug 1, 2014 at 10:22 AM, Mark Headd <[address removed]> wrote:
Chris,

One thing I think you'll want to take into consideration when comparing across states is the different mix of services that are provided at the local level vs. state level in different states. for example, to the extent that states push the non-federal share of costs for things like entitlement programs down to local governments, you might be comparing apples and oranges by doing a per capita cost comparison between cities. New York State is one of the few states that requires local governments to kick in for the non-federal share for the cost of Medicaid.

In addition, you may want to take note of the source of revenue that is being budgeted. In order to spend any funds, regardless of where they come from, they need to be included in a budget and adopted as part of the official budget process. So (for example) even if a city is awarded a state or federal grant, they need to allocate that in the budget - you can probably control for this by looking at a city's General Fund budget - an excluding any special funds - but it's something to be aware of.

Hope this helps.




On Fri, Aug 1, 2014 at 9:59 AM, Chris Whong <[address removed]> wrote:
Hi BetaNYC,

I am working on a little side project to analyze the size of city budgets as compared to population.  

Did you know that New York City spends $8,317.65 per resident per year?  
Did you know that LA spends $1,978.61 per resident per year?
Why does it cost 4x as much to provide services to a New Yorker?  What does this ratio look like when we drill down to smaller cities?

I want to do a simple analysis of this ratio for the top 100 cities in the U.S.  I have a public google spreadsheet here that I need help filling in.

The task at hand is to find a figure for the FY14 [masked]) operating budget for each city, paste in the number, and paste in a link to where you found this number.  

I want to see what the curve of this data looks like and see where the outliers are.  

If you're interested in helping, please jump on the google doc and fire away.  Thanks!

-Chris




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