addressalign-toparrow-leftarrow-rightbackbellblockcalendarcameraccwcheckchevron-downchevron-leftchevron-rightchevron-small-downchevron-small-leftchevron-small-rightchevron-small-upchevron-upcircle-with-checkcircle-with-crosscircle-with-pluscrossdots-three-verticaleditemptyheartexporteye-with-lineeyefacebookfolderfullheartglobegmailgooglegroupshelp-with-circleimageimagesinstagramFill 1linklocation-pinm-swarmSearchmailmessagesminusmoremuplabelShape 3 + Rectangle 1ShapeoutlookpersonJoin Group on CardStartprice-ribbonprintShapeShapeShapeShapeImported LayersImported LayersImported Layersshieldstartickettrashtriangle-downtriangle-uptwitteruserwarningyahoo
Jane
user 6496504
Seattle, WA
Post #: 1
Japan switched off its last working reactor in early May amid a debate over whether the country should retain nuclear power in the wake of the Fukushima disaster last year. As it is already the world’s third-largest oil consumer, what role can alternative power generation play to help make up the country's energy shortfall?
Jane
user 6496504
Seattle, WA
Post #: 2
Guess renewable energy will have to wait. "Renewable energy contributes a rather small amount in both Japan and Germany, and it's inevitable that a large chunk of lost nuclear will be replaced by cheaper fossil fuels."
http://af.reuters.com...­
Krib S.
user 49646422
Bangkok, TH
Post #: 1
Personally, I don't think large nuclear power plant is the future but micro-nuclear reactor might be easier to manage in terms of risks but that would still leave how we deal with the radioactive waste. There's some school of thoughts that a redesign of nuclear power plant are needed in order to prevent meltdowns and radiation leaks. Saw something on Thorium as an alternative nuclear fuel but not sure how credible it is.

According to recent survey, "70 percent of Japanese believe the country should reduce its reliance on nuclear energy, up from 44 percent last year." If Japan is going to step away from nuclear how would they position themselves in having sufficient supply of energy for the demand that under normal working day. (Saw an article that Japan reduced its peak demand by asking companies and the public to reduce their electricity consumption. Think it was on Reuters as well.) Cheaper fossil fuels such as natural gas might be used. There still the limitation on space for Japan for construction of new power plants and the gap before these power plants become online. It will be interesting to follow how the Japanese government and public will react to these challenges and what solutions are used.
http://www.washington...­

Whether major economies such as Germany and Japan can shift to renewable energy would be quite interesting to watch. One of the drawback of renewable energy is its inconsistency in delivering power 24/7. There's a lot of technological research that is trying to break that barrier whether it be switching to biomass power plant (debatable on CO2 emission and its effect on food supply) and battery storage to manage the electrical output over demand period. Saw an interesting TED talk by Donald Sadoway on his liquid metals battery. http://www.ted.com/ta...­
Andreas
anho
Bangkok, TH
Post #: 1
The fact that both Japan and Germany has decided to switch off their nuclear reactors came up during our discussion (as one might expect). Someone asked how Germany—already a leader in clean energy—would ramp up production to account for the loss of output. Phil's answer, and I'm paraphrasing here, was that Germany had found a solution already: buying juice from nuclear plants in France. Sounds a bit shortsighted if you ask me but I guess it all harkens back to the adage Not-In-My-Backyard. Prisions, outreach programs, nuclear plats, and wind turbines are great... as long as they're not near my house. In the end, I suspect clean energy is as much an issue for policy and education as it is for technology (a fact that also came up during the discussion).
Jane
user 6496504
Seattle, WA
Post #: 3
Nuclear is back!
Japan plans to start nuclear power stations for the first time since last year's Fukushima according to Bloomberg. (Reuters) - Kansai Electric Power Co's (9503.T) No. 3 unit at its Ohi plant, in western Japan, will resume supplying power to the grid as early as Thursday, and its No. 4 unit will also restart this month, as the government seeks to avoid a summer power crunch. Japan will yet again have to find a balance between the costs of a complete withdrawal from atomic energy and the long-term benifit of renewable which currently is not enough to satisfy Japan's energy needs.
Globally, renewable energy accounted for around 20% of electricity production in 2011, according to Renewable Energy Policy for the 21st Century, with around 15% of that coming from hydropower.



Marian Y.
user 29443922
Bangkok, TH
Post #: 1
Perhaps the concentration for Japan is to focus on 'SAFETY', to which much can be done to secure the plants.
Going back to the same way of doing business is not wise. Eventually the condition of the plants will need to be corrected for any future disaster of 'history repeating itself'. Even a country like Japan, the corruption within the large corporations is rampant. The issue is always about how to improve 'SAFETY', which there are technology available to upgrade. Just do it!
Powered by mvnForum

People in this
Meetup are also in:

Sign up

Meetup members, Log in

By clicking "Sign up" or "Sign up using Facebook", you confirm that you accept our Terms of Service & Privacy Policy