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November Dinner & Discussion:On Beauty by Zadie Smith

  • Nov 21, 2013 · 7:00 PM
  • This location is shown only to members

For November we will be reading, "On Beauty" by Zadie Smith.

Truly human, fully ourselves, beautiful," muses a character in Smith's third novel, an intrepid attempt to explore the sad stuff of adult life, 21st century–style: adultery, identity crises and emotional suffocation, interracial and intraracial global conflicts and religious zealotry. Like Smith's smash debut, White Teeth (2000), this work gathers narrative steam from the clash between two radically different families, with a plot that explicitly parallels Howards End. A failed romance between the evangelical son of the messy, liberal Belseys;Howard is Anglo-WASP and Kiki African-American;and the gorgeous daughter of the staid, conservative, Anglo-Caribbean Kipps leads to a soulful, transatlantic understanding between the families' matriarchs, Kiki and Carlene, even as their respective husbands, the art professors Howard and Monty, amass matériel for the culture wars at a fictional Massachusetts university. Meanwhile, Howard and Kiki must deal with Howard's extramarital affair, as their other son, Levi, moves from religion to politics. Everyone theorizes about art, and everyone searches for connections, sexual and otherwise. A very simple but very funny joke;that Howard, a Rembrandt scholar, hates Rembrandt;allows Smith to discourse majestically on some of the master's finest paintings. The articulate portrait of daughter Zora depicts the struggle to incorporate intellectual values into action. The elaborate Forster homage, as well as a too-neat alignment between characters, concerns and foils, threaten Smith's insightful probing of what makes life complicated (and beautiful), but those insights eventually add up. "There is such a shelter in each other," Carlene tells Kiki; it's a take on Forster's "Only Connect;," but one that finds new substance here.
-Publisher's Weekly

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  • A former member
    A former member

    Looks like my other event will get over later than I thought - I'll be arriving too late to make an effective contribution to the discussion, so I'm bowing out.

    November 21, 2013

  • Faith R.

    Thanks for inviting me to attend but I have a commitment on that day and so must regretfully decline. Enjoy

    November 20, 2013

  • Jessica

    Here is an extra challenge to you avid readers...the author says she based this novel from her love of Forster's "Howard's End". I plan to read this one as well to add to the discussion.

    October 22, 2013

  • A former member
    A former member

    I am interested in this event but I need to know where it will meet.

    October 18, 2013

    • Jessica

      The restaurant will be updated soon. I will add it to the post once the reservation has been made.

      October 18, 2013

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