New Event: Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides

From: Greg
Sent on: Sunday, August 26, 2007 9:36 PM
Announcing a new event for a ne{o}lit book club!

What: Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides

When: Wednesday, September 26, 7:30 PM

voluntary event fee: USD1.00 per person

Where: Click the link below to find out!

Event Description: Based on the consensus from August's meetup, the next book will be Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides (acclaimed author of The Virgin Suicides). It was also requested that we meet on a Wednesday, hence the change.

The location for this meetup may move, but we'll keep it in the Ohio City / Tremont area.

Amazon link for the book/reviews: http://www.amazon.com/Middlesex-Novel-Oprahs-Book-Club/dp/0312427735/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/002-8087807-9794461?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1188178386&sr=8-1

From Publishers Weekly
As the Age of the Genome begins to dawn, we will, perhaps, expect our fictional protagonists to know as much about the chemical details of their ancestry as Victorian heroes knew about their estates. If so, Eugenides (The Virgin Suicides) is ahead of the game. His beautifully written novel begins: "Specialized readers may have come across me in Dr. Peter Luce's study, 'Gender Identity in 5-Alpha-Reductase Pseudohermaphrodites.' " The "me" of that sentence, "Cal" Stephanides, narrates his story of sexual shifts with exemplary tact, beginning with his immigrant grandparents, Desdemona and Lefty. On board the ship taking them from war-torn Turkey to America, they married-but they were brother and sister. Eugenides spends the book's first half recreating, with a fine-grained density, the Detroit of the 1920s and '30s where the immigrants settled: Ford car factories and the tiny, incipient sect of Black Muslims. Then comes Cal's story, which is necessarily interwoven with his parents' upward social trajectory. Milton, his father, takes an insurance windfall and parlays it into a fast-food hotdog empire. Meanwhile, Tessie, his wife, gives birth to a son and then a daughter-or at least, what seems to be a female baby. Genetics meets medical incompetence meets history, and Callie is left to think of her "crocus" as simply unusually long-until she reaches the age of 14. Eugenides, like Rick Moody, has an extraordinary sensitivity to the mores of our leafier suburbs, and Cal's gender confusion is blended with the story of her first love, Milton's growing political resentments and the general shedding of ethnic habits. Perhaps the most wonderful thing about this book is Eugenides's ability to feel his way into the girl, Callie, and the man, Cal. It's difficult to imagine any serious male writer of earlier eras so effortlessly transcending the stereotypes of gender. This is one determinedly literary novel that should also appeal to a large, general audience.

Learn more here:
http://bookclub.meetup.com/17/calendar/6248260/

People in this
Meetup are also in:

Sign up

Meetup members, Log in

By clicking "Sign up" or "Sign up using Facebook", you confirm that you accept our Terms of Service & Privacy Policy