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Re: [bookclub-792] Dan Ariely in Berkeley on June 3 (Thursday eve)

From: user 5.
Sent on: Friday, April 9, 2010 3:29 PM
Yes, there seems likely a point where excess abstraction and  
prediction limit
reproductive multigenerational success. Like having your kids become  
priests.

-0-

On Apr 9, 2010, at 3:19 PM, Peter B wrote:

> If he comes from an economics background, that might be why the  
> terms are
> conflated.
>
> Economists talk about a "rational consumer," or the myth thereof,  
> which
> really is a logical-within-an-ec­onomic-sphere-and-as­suming-the-models-
> capture-the-goals consumer.
>
> It turns out that some folks have very good luck modeling a lot of  
> animal
> foraging behavior assuming logical/rational economic underpinnings -  
> far
> more luck than often is had modeling people behavior.
>
> -Peter
>
>> Perhaps I'm misinformed, but isn't he talking about illogical, not
>> irrational?
>>
>> Especially if the illogical is rational, that is, good for us
>> personally.
>>
>> His main message seems to be that our instincts are statistical  
>> because
>> they're evolutionary. Evolution doesn't do logic.
>>
>> Ormond Otvos
>>
>> On Apr 9, 2010, at 1:38 AM, Peter wrote:
>>
>>> Dan Ariely, who wrote the book PREDICTABLY IRRATIONAL that we
>>> discussed
>>> in our group, will be speaking at the Hillside Club, 2286 Cedar St.,
>>> Berkeley, on Thursday, June 3, at 7:30 p.m.
>>>
>>> He'll be talking about his new book, THE UPSIDE OF IRRATIONALITY:
>>> The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home.
>>>
>>> Tickets are $12 in advance or $15 at the door
>>> http://www.berkel...­
>>> (This is the kind of event that Cody's and Black Oak Books used to
>>> host for free, but they went out of business because we, local
>>> residents, didn't reciprocate by buying enough books from them.
>>> So now we have to pay to meet authors on book tour.)
>>>
>>> Here's the blurb:
>>>
>>> You hear him frequently on public radio -- now meet the incomparable
>>> Dan Ariely when he introduces his new book The Upside of
>>> Irrationality!
>>>
>>> The 2008 economic crisis taught us that irrationality is an
>>> influential player in financial markets. But it is often the case  
>>> that
>>> irrationality also makes it way into our daily lives and
>>> decision-making -- in slightly different and vastly more subtle
>>> ways. In this enthralling follow-up to his New York Times bestseller
>>> Predictably Irrational, Dan Ariely shows how irrationality is an
>>> inherent part of the way we function and think, and how it affects  
>>> our
>>> behavior in all areas of our lives, from our romantic  
>>> relationships to
>>> our experiences in the workplace to our temptations to cheat.
>>>
>>> Blending everyday experience with groundbreaking analysis and new
>>> research into our how we actually make decisions, Ariely explains  
>>> how
>>> expectations, emotions, social norms, and other invisible, seemingly
>>> illogical forces skew our reasoning abilities. Using data from
>>> original experiments, he draws invaluable conclusions about how --  
>>> and
>>> why -- we behave the way we do, and reflects on ways we can make
>>> ourselves and our society better.  Dan explores the truth about:
>>>
>>> - What we think will make us happy and what really makes us happy;
>>> - How we learn to love the ones we are with;
>>> - Why online dating doesn't work, and how we can improve on it;
>>> - Why learning more about people makes us like them less;
>>> - Why large bonuses can make CEOs less productive;
>>> - How to really motivate people at work;
>>> - Why bad directions can help us;
>>> - How we fall in love with our ideas;
>>> - How we are motivated by revenge;
>>> - What motivates us to cheat.
>>>
>>> Drawing on the same experimental methods that made Predictably
>>> Irrational one of the most talked about bestsellers, Ariely  
>>> emphasizes
>>> the important role that irrationality plays in our day-to-day
>>> decision-making -- not just in our financial marketplace, but in the
>>> most intimate aspects of our lives.
>>>
>>> "A marvelous book that is both thought provoking and highly
>>> entertaining, ranging from the power of placebos to the pleasures of
>>> Pepsi. Ariely unmasks the subtle but powerful tricks that our minds
>>> play on us, and shows us how we can prevent being fooled."  --  
>>> Jerome
>>> Groopman, New York Times bestselling author of How Doctors Think
>>>
>>> Dan Ariely is the James B. Duke Professor of Behavioral Economics at
>>> Duke University, with appointments at the Fuqua School of Business,
>>> the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, and the Department of
>>> Economics. He has also held a visiting professorship at MIT's Media
>>> Lab. He has appeared on CNN and CNBC, and is a regular commentator  
>>> on
>>> National Public Radio's All Things Considered and Marketplace. He
>>> lives in Durham, NC, with his wife and two children.
>>>
>>> http://www.berkel...­
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> --
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>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
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>>
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>
>
>
>
>
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