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Boston Data Visualization Message Board › Data Visualization and Computer Vision in Astronomy and Medicine, Wed Apr 17

Data Visualization and Computer Vision in Astronomy and Medicine, Wed Apr 17

David S.
user 58962032
Cambridge, MA
Post #: 1
Hello Boston Data Visualization members!
You're invited to a meetup on data visualization and computer vision being held next week, featuring two exciting presentations - one on data visualization in astronomy and medicine and another on using NASA satellite imagery and computer vision to help predict damaging solar flares. This event is being held by the Boston Image Processing and Computer Vision Group - see details below. Hope to see some of you there!
Thanks,
David

Data Visualization and Computer Vision in Astronomy, Solar Physics and Medicine
Wednesday April 17, 7-9 pm
Commons Set Theater at Microsoft NERD Center, One Memorial Drive, Cambridge, MA
http://www.meetup.com...­

A meetup by the Boston Image Processing and Computer Vision Group. Food will be provided by Charles River Analytics. Here's an outline of the agenda:

7:00-7:30 pm: Networking session. Drinks and pizzas will be available.

7:30-8:05 pm: “Astronomical Medicine and beyond: Visualization challenges and solutions across the sciences”, by Michelle Borkin (Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences)

8:05-8:40 pm: "Studying the sun with computer vision and NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory", by Henry (Trae) Winter (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics)
______________________________________­_____

Astronomical Medicine and beyond: Visualization challenges and solutions across the sciences

Michelle Borkin, PhD candidate at Harvard's School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Abstract: What can help enable both the treatment of heart disease and the discovery of newborn stars? Visualization. Specifically interdisciplinary data visualization, the sharing and co-development of tools and techniques across the imaging sciences. In this talk I will share sample results from my own research and experience crossing disciplines and bringing together the knowledge and experts of astrophysics, computer science, computational physics, radiology and medicine. I will present new visualization techniques and tools inspired by this work for both the medical and astronomical communities.

Biography: Michelle Borkin works on creating new approaches to interdisciplinary scientific visualization and data exploration. She co-founded the “Astronomical Medicine” project at Harvard and collaborates with both astronomers and doctors to help them analyze and visualize their multidimensional data, and cross-fertilize visualization and analysis techniques across scientific disciplines. Michelle graduated from Harvard College with a BA in Astronomy & Astrophysics and Physics in 2006, and is now an Applied Physics PhD candidate at Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) where she also received a MS in Applied Physics in 2011. She has been published in journals from Nature to the Astrophysical Journal and is a National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellow and a National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellow. She was a TEDGlobal 2009 Fellow and an invited speaker at TEDxBoston 2011.


Studying the sun with computer vision and NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory

Henry Winter, astrophysicist at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

Abstract: The sun's activity is being observed in unprecedented detail by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), which was launched into geosynchronous orbit in 2010. The spacecraft's instruments return 1.5 TB of data each day, including high resolution images taken every ~10 seconds in multiple UV channels with the spacecraft's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). To cope with this volume of data, computer vision techniques are being applied to automate detection of solar flares and other solar events, which can be hazardous to satellites and disrupt radio communication and GPS navigation on Earth. Details of computer vision techniques applied to AIA imagery will be be discussed.

Biography: Henry Winter is an astrophysicist at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. He has a BS from the University of Memphis and a PhD from Montana State University.
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