Portland Book Group

We are no longer meeting at the old TVFR station.  We are now at Station # 65 on SW 103rd Ave.  IF YOU HAVE A SUGGESTION FOR OUR NEXT BOOK, PLEASE SUBMIT IT NOW.

For June 12th, we will be reading the last half of the book, Chapter 6 through the Conclusion (pp 130-271), of Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain.  The book has been highly reviewed on Amazon and I have been eager to read it for some time.  It should be a fast read compared to some of our recent books.  I am finding that the book relates well to our last book, by Jonathan Haidt.

Here is the Amazon review:

The book that started the Quiet Revolution 

At least one-third of the people we know are introverts. They are the ones who prefer listening to speaking; who innovate and create but dislike self-promotion; who favor working on their own over working in teams. It is to introverts—Rosa Parks, Chopin, Dr. Seuss, Steve Wozniak-- that we owe many of the great contributions to society. 

In Quiet, Susan Cain argues that we dramatically undervalue introverts and shows how much we lose in doing so. She charts the rise of the Extrovert Ideal throughout the twentieth century and explores how deeply it has come to permeate our culture. She also introduces us to successful introverts–from a witty, high-octane public speaker who recharges in solitude after his talks, to a record-breaking salesman who quietly taps into the power of questions. Passionately argued, superbly researched, and filled with indelible stories of real people, Quiethas the power to permanently change how we see introverts and, equally important, how they see themselves. 

Now with Extra Libris material, including a reader’s guide and bonus content

There are two candidates for the next book, and I will take other suggestions if you have one.  First is Thinking Fast and Slow by Kahneman.

In the international bestseller, Thinking, Fast and Slow, Daniel Kahneman, the renowned psychologist and winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics, takes us on a groundbreaking tour of the mind and explains the two systems that drive the way we think. System 1 is fast, intuitive, and emotional; System 2 is slower, more deliberative, and more logical. The impact of overconfidence on corporate strategies, the difficulties of predicting what will make us happy in the future, the profound effect of cognitive biases on everything from playing the stock market to planning our next vacation—each of these can be understood only by knowing how the two systems shape our judgments and decisions.
Engaging the reader in a lively conversation about how we think, Kahneman reveals where we can and cannot trust our intuitions and how we can tap into the benefits of slow thinking. He offers practical and enlightening insights into how choices are made in both our business and our personal lives—and how we can use different techniques to guard against the mental glitches that often get us into trouble. Winner of the National Academy of Sciences Best Book Award and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize and selected by The New York Times Book Review as one of the ten best books of 2011, Thinking, Fast and Slow is destined to be a classic.

The second candidate book is Subliminal by Leonard Mlodinow:

Over the past two decades of neurological research, it has become increasingly clear that the way we experience the world--our perception, behavior, memory, and social judgment--is largely driven by the mind's subliminal processes and not by the conscious ones, as we have long believed. As in the bestselling The Drunkard’s Walk: How Randomness Rules Our Lives, Leonard Mlodinow employs his signature concise, accessible explanations of the most obscure scientific subjects to unravel the complexities of the subliminal mind. In the process he shows the many ways it influences how we misperceive our relationships with family, friends, and business associates; how we misunderstand the reasons for our investment decisions; and how we misremember important events--along the way, changing our view of ourselves and the world around us.



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  • A former member
    A former member

    Something came up. It was a good book -- sorry to have to miss the discussion.

    June 11, 2013

  • David J.

    Can't come this time, but would second Subliminal by Leonard Mlodinow for next time.

    June 10, 2013

  • Joan Reynolds

    I wanted to make it to the first one but I had too much grading to do. I think I can make it to this one.

    May 9, 2013

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