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CFI-NYC Social Justice Book Club

  • Jul 28, 2014 · 6:30 PM
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The tools to make real change! The Social Justice Book Club aims to provide the background reading to progressive secular activism and expand the literary horizons of those interested in the diverse world of marginalized voices. Whether the intersection of race, gender, sexuality, class, ability, and religion is a little new to you or already fires up the passionate activist within, join us for some insightful literature and lively discussion Get your book TODAY! 

(Please make sure to read the selection before attending a discussion. Due to the nature of the subject matter, it's important that conversations don't get derailed due to a lack of direct knowledge of the text being discussed. Thank you!) 

Join the Facebook discussion group to keep the conversation going at

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1404247559847491/

For July we'll be reading 'Do They Hear You When You Cry' by Fauziya Kassindja, Layli Miller Bashir

'For Fauziya Kassindja, an idyllic childhood in Togo, West Africa, sheltered from the tribal practices of polygamy and genital mutilation, ended with her beloved father's sudden death. Forced into an arranged marriage at age seventeen, Fauziya was told to prepare for kakia, the ritual also known as female genital mutilation. It is a ritual no woman can refuse. But Fauziya dared to try. 

'This is her story--told in her own words--of fleeing Africa just hours before the ritual kakia was to take place, of seeking asylum in America only to be locked up in U.S. prisons, and of meeting Layli Miller Bashir, a law student who became Fauziya's friend and advocate during her horrifying sixteen months behind bars. Layli enlisted help from Karen Musalo, an expert in refugee law and acting director of the American University International Human Rights Clinic. In addition to devoting her own considerable efforts to the case, Musalo assembled a team to fight with her on Fauziya's behalf. Ultimately, in a landmark decision in immigration history, Fauziya Kassindja was granted asylum on June 13, 1996. Do They Hear You When You Cry is her unforgettable chronicle of triumph.'

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  • Ed B.

    Well done!

    July 29, 2014

3 went

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