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Re: [Cleveland-AI-ML-support-group] Meeting tomorrow

From: Joe
Sent on: Saturday, February 4, 2012 12:06 AM
 Thanks for setting this up Timmy, I'm excited to take part in the Higher Education group. That site is ultra informative. This discussion is pretty interesting:
http://biostar.st...­

 They seem to be saying they have the ability to get huge amounts of data and an associated auto analysis system from commercial providers for a given genome, but even then find out there is still much work left, to uncover the information and connections they were looking for. Their discussion sounds not uncommon for software projects.

 From what I have found so far, intro Bioinformatics courses seem to use publicly available NIH tools: http://www.ncbi.n...­ And there are a few other popular ones also for specific tasks like Pymol.

 A leading Bioinformatics algo book has code in Perl, C and Java:
http://bix.ucsd.e...­

 It may be that most Bio people will be familiar with the NIH tools but not the algo material, unless they are specializing in Bioinformatics.

 The table of contents of this book shows that it covers much of the same material as the AI course, like hidden Markov models:
http://bix.ucsd.e...­

 Lisp was the most popular AI language until being out marketed by Perl, Python and Java in the 90's. It looks like modern Bioinformatics developed in that same time period and thus ended up with a focus on those languages.

See you tomorrow,
Joe

 



--- On Fri, 2/3/12, Timmy Wilson <[address removed]> wrote:

> From: Timmy Wilson <[address removed]>
> Subject: Re: [Cleveland-AI-ML-sup­port-group] Meeting tomorrow
> To: [address removed]
> Date: Friday, February 3, 2012, 9:30 PM
> Joe -- this is exciting -- i have the
> camera/mic/tripod -- the
> video/sound quality is pretty good -- this is the start of
> your long
> tv/film career mr O'Donnell
> 
> > I'll bet that person movement tracking system would
> > be useful in a hospital to help analyze and reduce the
> > spread of pathogens.
> 
> great idea!!
> 
> biobike looks interesting
> 
> this forum seems to attract a lot of computational
> biologists --
> http://biostar.st...­
> 
> the popular question categories paints a nice picture of
> current
> software demand -- http://biostar.st...­
> 
> i'm curious what the top biology schools use ?
> 
> 
> 
> On Fri, Feb 3, 2012 at 4:46 PM, Joe <[address removed]>
> wrote:
> >  I'll bet that person movement tracking system would
> be useful in a hospital to help analyze and reduce the
> spread of pathogens. There are so many new potential uses
> for AI/ML coming about.
> >
> >  Tomorrow I'll give a short presentation on
> programmable bioinformatics using the BioBike platform.
> BioBike is unique, in that it attempts and largely succeeds
> in being powerfully useful to both the none programmer and
> programmer Bioinformatics analyst. The none programmer can
> access Bioinformatics tools on an already setup unified
> platform, and store and manipulate the resulting data with
> diagrams. You can manipulate/program data with either code
> or diagrams.
> >
> >  I attended an Explorys event in Cleveland on
> Wednesday. Explorys looks like a future Google of Bio data.
> There are big things happening with Bio data in the
> Cleveland area. Imo Biobike is the most powerful molecular
> Bioinformatics analysis platform, and also the most future
> oriented.
> >
> >  On the last page of the below pdf, is a comparison of
> English language, Perl code and Biobike code for a
> Bioinformatics problem. It shows how the Biobike code is a
> closer, shorter and more understandable match to the English
> language statement of the problem. Biobike Lisp code is
> written like this: (+ 2 2) means 2 + 2 and returns 4. (* 3
> (+ 2 2)) means 3 X (2 + 2) and returns 12.
> >
> > http://www.commer...­
> >
> >
> > Joe
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > --
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> > This message was sent by Joe ([address removed])
> from Cleveland higher education support group.
> > To learn more about Joe, visit his/her member profile:
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> >
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> >
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> > Meetup, PO Box 4668 #37895 New York, New York
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> 
> 
> 
> --
> Please Note: If you hit "REPLY", your message will be sent
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> This message was sent by Timmy Wilson ([address removed])
> from Cleveland higher education support group.
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> profile: http://www.meetup...­
> Set my mailing list to email me
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