Confirmed Truths and Remaining Mysteries Regarding the Origin of Our Universe

The Institute for the Science of Origins will welcome Lloyd Knox, professor of physics at the University of California at Davis, for a special lecture, titled “Confirmed Truths and Remaining Mysteries Regarding the Origin of Our Universe.” Knox will present his lecture Wednesday, Feb. 26, at 7 p.m. at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History.

In his talk, he will trace the history of the “big bang” picture of our origins, clarifying its observational successes and highlighting the remaining questions that drive us toward deeper exploration.

Knox is leading a nationwide team determining the basic parameters of the cosmos from the data recently acquired by the European Space Agency’s Planck satellite.

The event—co-sponsored by the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, The Center for Education and Research in Cosmology and Astrophysics (CERCA) and the Department of Physics of Case Western Reserve University—is free for students with an ID and for museum members; all others must pay the price of museum admission ($6 on Wednesday nights).

Thank you Justine for the heads-up on this!

See you there!

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  • shaggie

    A Ned Wright page explains the confusion about distance that can result when not realizing that the cosmological distance and time used in the Hubble law are different than those used in special relativity.

    http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/cosmo_02.htm#DH

    Ned Wright tutorial home:

    http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/cosmolog.htm

    March 2, 2014

  • shaggie

    Ned Wright has an informative cosmology tutorial website. A Java app in the link below accepts a redshift number and calculates the comoving radial distance. For a flat universe, entering a redshift value of z=10 shows a comoving distance of about 31.5 billion light-years and a light travel time of 13.2 billion years. Note that the comoving radial distance also depends on the cosmological model and its parameters (Hubble constant and amount of matter and dark energy), as these affect the rate that the universe has been expanding over its lifetime (analogous to the rate of the expansion of a balloon over time). The Java app allows these parameters to be entered.

    Java Cosmology Calculator:

    http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/CosmoCalc.html

    March 2, 2014

  • shaggie

    The universe has expanded during the time that the light has traveled to us, so the distance to a distant object is greater than the speed of light times the travel time. It's analogous to the distance between two crawling bugs on a balloon skin getting very far apart from each other as the balloon expands over a given time period. For the same time period in a non-expanding balloon world, the crawl rate of the bugs isn't enough to create such a large distance.

    Galaxies formed and started emitting light after the inflation era, so the expansion that causes the redshift of light we see from a galaxy today occurred after inflation. The actual distance between the object and observer is called the comoving radial distance.

    March 2, 2014

  • Mark T.

    I enjoyed the lecture- as others indicated, it may not have covered much "new ground" but I'm still perplexed by a few things. For instance, the most distant galaxy yet observed is estimated to be 30 billion light years away. I get it, I get it, we're observing it as it was 13 billion years ago but I'm having trouble reconciling how "hyperinflation" could have carried the object that far from us in that amount of time. Either I don't understand the hyperinflation or I don't understand the structure of the universe just after big bang. As usual, the best part of the meetup was hanging out with y'all. About 10 of us stayed pretty late at Mi Pueblo! :)

    1 · March 1, 2014

  • shaggie

    A 24-page article about symmetry and synthesis in science. http://theory.uwinnipeg.ca/users/gabor/symmetry/slide1.html

    Einstein's synthesis of Maxwell and Newton is mentioned as well as other examples of synthesis.

    http://theory.uwinnipeg.ca/users/gabor/symmetry/slide9.html

    February 28, 2014

  • Steven M. W.

    I didn't understand the part about the inconsistency between Maxwell's laws of electro-magnetism and Newton's Laws pof gravity and how general relativity harmonized the two theories.

    February 27, 2014

    • shaggie

      The following article qualitatively summarizes the conflict between Newtownian mechanics and Maxwell's electromagnetic theory and the approach that unified them. In short, the problem was that Maxwell's electromagnetic theory was not invariant when using the Galilean transformation of Newtonian mechanics. It was replaced with the Lorentz transformation which made Maxwell's theory invariant. Invariant refers to the physics theory being consistent for all observers who are moving in an inertial (non-accelerating) frame relative to one other.

      Maxwell's Electromagnetic Theory and Special Relativity
      Graham Hall*

      http://rsta.royalsoci...­

      pdf:
      http://rsta.royalsoci...­

      February 28, 2014

  • Tim C.

    My guess, Steven, is that the behaviour of light was inconsistent. The Theory of Electromagnetism (the idea that electricity and magnetism were two sides of the same coin and responsible for the production of light) made predictions that were valid within that theory, but did not match up to what Newton's Laws of Gravity expected! But to be honest, this part was a bit above my paygrade!

    1 · February 27, 2014

  • Christopher D.

    Not really "new nad exciting" information

    February 27, 2014

  • Morgan

    In case anyone missed us: we're headed now to Mi Pueblo, 116th & Euclid

    February 26, 2014

  • Justine R.

    Anyone still on their way want to give me a ride from Case?

    February 26, 2014

    • Morgan

      Mark's cell: (216)[masked]

      February 26, 2014

    • Justine R.

      I can meet you right outside of Rainbow Babies and children

      February 26, 2014

  • Ram

    Any plans for dinner afterwards? Brain burning lectures make me hungry. :-)

    2 · February 25, 2014

    • Robyn

      What about the Jolly Scholar? That is super close - .4 miles from the museum. According to their website, they are open until midnight.

      February 26, 2014

    • Robyn

      Oh and they are very reasonable.

      February 26, 2014

  • Mark T.

    Morgan & I will be arriving about 20 minutes early - let's meet up by that pendulum thingee.

    February 25, 2014

    • Debbi

      That's a Foucalt pendulum, I worked with Jerry Griesmer, the inventor of the magnetic actuator that keeps adding a kick to each swing to counter air friction. Fun with fields, lol.

      1 · February 26, 2014

    • Mark T.

      Cool Debbi, thanks! And see you at the Foucalt! :)

      February 26, 2014

  • Tim C.

    I'm cool if folks want to go out! Mama Santos is nearby as well. If not, I was planning to stop at Happy Dog on way home, But am open!

    February 25, 2014

  • Ram

    Tentative

    February 20, 2014

  • shaggie

    "Hacking the Cosmos" --Crunching Planck Data of Big-Bang Afterglow Reveals Daunting New Puzzles

    http://www.dailygalaxy.com/my_weblog/2013/03/-hacking-the-cosmos-crunching-new-planck-data-on-big-bang-afterglow-reveals-stunning-puzzles.html

    February 19, 2014

  • Maria

    Tentative as I may have to drive my son to airport that night.

    February 19, 2014

  • Jeff F.

    Nice event which I won't be able to make from Kansas... Hope to find it on youtube.

    February 18, 2014

  • laura s.

    In this weather it's just too difficult to take the trains.

    February 18, 2014

  • Mark T.

    Unfortunately it's an additional $6 for parking in the museum lot. Free street parking can usually be found, though, for those that don't mind a walk.

    February 18, 2014

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