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Re: [humanism-174] Re: Article: "Can Your Child be Too Religious?"

From: Tim C.
Sent on: Friday, March 29, 2013 1:32 PM
Actually, the religious vs non-believing is only incidental to the issue.  Fact is that students at private schools GENERALLY do better academically than students at public schools, but I do not believe that religion is the major factor.  There are non-religious private schools (University School and Hawken and Hathaway Brown locally) that also outperform most public schools AND outperform many private schools.  And THAT said, there are public schools that compete well (Westlake HS and Shaker are often touted for their academic performance). 
 
More important factor is parental involvement and commitment.  Regardless of the school's format, when parents are involved and committed to the child's education, the child usually does well.  When the parents are not, then the child usually does not.  There are exceptions, of course, but we are dealing with generalities here.  There is a range among private schools as well, but in general, a student at St. Ignatius is not going to be outperformed by his counterpart at Hawken. 
 
Must also point out that parental involvement and the presence of tuition may not be a coincidence, but of course one asks which came first, the tuition or the parent?!!
 
Tim Campbell
 
 
In a message dated 3/29/2013 1:11:17 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, [address removed] writes:
My mom tried to convince me that the only reason for anything good in my life is God and everything bad is my fault. From her perspective, If it weren't for her invisible parental figure, my life would be a meaningless chain of negative effects on reality.
I still suffer the psychological, anti social effects of overcoming that upbringing.
I suspect Glens suspicion is merited. . . . lol


On Fri, Mar 29, 2013 at 12:33 PM, Glen <[address removed]> wrote:
I suspect that self-esteem may often go the other direction (south) with children in highly religious homes and/or schools, where they end up feeling a lot of guilt & shame when they don't meet expectations of parents and religious teachers, or think they may be in danger of going to hell, etc.  In terms of academic performance, I doubt anyone has shown that religious students do better than non-believing students.



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