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Mark T.
user 4783078
Cleveland, OH
Post #: 517
There's no getting around the fact that religion gets undeserved "special treatment" in our public discourse.

For example, the scientifically and philosophically empty idea of "intelligent design" is undeservedly given merit as an "alternative opinion", even though science nor logic supports such an idea. Supporters of ID may attempt to mask its foundational basis (religion), but the "mask" is transparent.

For explanations of apparent order in nature, we must look elsewhere-

SELF-ORGANIZATION­

EMERGENCE









Mark T.
user 4783078
Cleveland, OH
Post #: 518
This video concentrates on the mechanisms behind evolution... pretty mind-boggley! :)



A former member
Post #: 16
Stephen Wolfram - Rule 30: "This rule is of particular interest because it produces complex, seemingly-random patterns from simple, well-defined rules. Because of this, Wolfram believes that rule 30, and cellular automata in general, are the key to understanding how simple rules produce complex structures and behaviour in nature."

http://en.wikipedia.o...­

More wiki - Cellular Automaton
http://en.wikipedia.o...­

Quoted from Cellular Automaton link:
"...discrete model studied in computability theory, mathematics, physics, complexity science, theoretical biology and microstructure modeling. It consists of a regular grid of cells, each in one of a finite number of states, such as "On" and "Off" (in contrast to a coupled map lattice). The grid can be in any finite number of dimensions. For each cell, a set of cells called its neighborhood (usually including the cell itself) is defined relative to the specified cell. For example, the neighborhood of a cell might be defined as the set of cells a distance of 2 or less from the cell. An initial state (time t=0) is selected by assigning a state for each cell. A new generation is created (advancing t by 1), according to some fixed rule (generally, a mathematical function) that determines the new state of each cell in terms of the current state of the cell and the states of the cells in its neighborhood. For example, the rule might be that the cell is "On" in the next generation if exactly two of the cells in the neighborhood are "On" in the current generation, otherwise the cell is "Off" in the next generation. Typically, the rule for updating the state of cells is the same for each cell and does not change over time, and is applied to the whole grid simultaneously, though exceptions are known."
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