align-toparrow-leftarrow-rightbackbellblockcalendarcamerachatcheckchevron-downchevron-leftchevron-rightchevron-small-downchevron-small-leftchevron-small-rightchevron-small-upchevron-upcircle-with-crosscrosseditemptyheartfacebookfullheartglobegoogleimagesinstagramlocation-pinmagnifying-glassmailmoremuplabelShape 3 + Rectangle 1outlookpersonplusImported LayersImported LayersImported Layersshieldstartwitteryahoo

Bluetongue vaccine

From: Philip R.
Sent on: Tuesday, October 27, 2009 10:01 PM

On the subject of vaccines, its not only humans suffering the indignity of forced vaccines: http://www.campaignforliberty.com/blog.php?view=26609


They Beta test on Farmers first: This article discusses widespread adverse reactions from cows to Bluetongue 8 vaccine, reported by The Scottish Farmer March 14th 2009. It is is typed from the original at the end of this article, which explains how the entire bluetongue scare and mandatory vaccination program are bogus and extremely damaging to cows and consumers.  

Hardy Heritage Breed cow common to Scotland


First part of the Scottish Farmer article:

Cattle are suffering adverse reactions to the compulsory bluetongue 8 vaccine now being administered around Scotland - but farmers are too afraid of being 'victimised' by the authorities to speak up about it.

This was the extraordinary claim of one Ayrshire beef cattle breeder, who told the Scottish Farmer this week that her entire herd of 158 Pedigree cattle had show a severe loss of condition since their second dose.

The breeder, who supplied her name but wished to remain anonymous, claimed that the vaccine manufacturer had since offered to pay for further veterinary testing of her herd to pay for further veterinary testing of her herd to determine the cause - but she was adamant that the vaccine was the sole root of her problems.

"The cattle were as fat as ever and thriving till they got their second dose, then the weight just fell off them. I'd estimate that the majority have lost between two and three hundredweight each. The calves were the least affected, but my best bull actually died.

"All the animals are eating as well as ever, and I've changed nothing in the feed - its just like the vaccine has done something to stop their guts working properly."

What clinched it for her was that one beast, destined for an early sale, was not vaccinated, and is now, she claimed, the only one in the herd gaining weight.

The breeder insisted that she was not alone* in her experience of the vaccine, but said there was a "climate of fear" preventing affected farmers from speaking up. "The feeling is, if you complain, your farm will be crawling with inspectors until they can find something to blame other than the vaccine." (*Note, original article had a typo, alone was spelt along)

However, the official line on the vaccine's excellent safety record remains unshaken, and was reinforced further by the results of a Europe-wide survey by the European Medicines Agency that found the frequency of adverse drug reactions to the bluetongue vaccine had been very low indeed, less than 1 in every 10,000 stock treated.


-----------------------------------


The article continues, as can be read below, to push the official position, and reinforce the legal force behind the ludicrous mandatory vaccination. Vaccination is mandatory in Scotland, following the Bluetongue (Scotland) Order 2008 (as amended). Following its first emergence in Scotland in 2007. This is to 'protect cows' from midges, which are the vectors of bluetongue. However, Scotland maintains its disease free status. The country is disease free because all cases to date have been from imported stock from Europe following unrestricted free trade of livestock within Europe, and Bluetongue is not contagious, as reported by the the BBC.

There is therefore no evidence that cows in Scotland are susceptible to bluetongue from native midges, no evidence that Scottish midges are vectors for bluetongue and no evidence that imports of infected cattle will cause an outbreak. Indeed, local breeds, as are common in Scotland, to deal with the harsh winter climate, will tend to have strong immunity to diseases carried by the local midge. This could help local people develop immunity also, because cows share antibodies via their milk, as do all mammals. Unfortunately, locals cannot benefit from these benefits, because most of the goodness in milk is destroyed by manditory pasteurization, raw milk is banned in Scotland, despite it being a safe, pure, wholefood. The hidden truth is, that pasteurized milk still sickens people, and in far greater numbers than the more heavily regulated raw product.


Returning to the issue of reported side-effects, could it be that the injection of Aluminum adjuvuncts, designed to agitate the immune system are part of the problem? The vaccine includes aluminium hydroxide and saponin adjuvants. One vaccine maker states that "the safety and the efficacy of the vaccine has not been established in breeding males." which would explain the farmer's particular problems with her breeding males. (click here for the manufacturers data page). Looking only at Wikipedia, we see that the pharmacological action of aluminum hydroxide is not known, but that it is associated with dementia and adverse neuropathy. It is not clear whether the compound reaches the gut, but if consumed orally it known to reduce stomach acid, which could affect their ability to digest food.

We also find that saponin complexes with cholesterol to form pores in cell membrane bilayers, e.g., in red cell (erythrocyte) membranes, where complexation leads to red cell lysis (hemolysis) on intravenous injection. In vivo (inside the body) hemolysis, which can be caused by a large number of conditions, can lead to anemia. Anemias caused by in vivo hemolysis are collectively called hemolytic anemias. Symptoms of anemia include fatigue, and late, heart failure. Jaundice may be present.

The manufacturer also states that "no information is available on the safety and efficacy of this vaccine when used with any other veterinary medicinal product. A decision to use this vaccine before or after any other veterinary medicinal product therefore needs to be decided on a case by case basis." But this is not possible with a manditory vaccine, and many cows are routinely medicated in anycase. And we see manditory vaccination of Bulls, when the manufacturer states that the affects on bulls are not known.
DEFRA and SEERAD, Government bodies advising on bluetongue, provide Orwellian doublethink for advice. They, on the one hand state that vaccines are the only way to guarantee prevention of the disease. Yet, in the same breath, they note that good husbandry can be employed to significantly reduce midge numbers. Surely, good husbandry is the solution, in a country with a disease free status? The bodies state that "Dung heaps or slurry pits should be covered or removed, and their perimeters (where most larvae are found) regularly scraped". It is therefore possible to reduce the risk to almost zero by properly managing dung and slurry. Imported animals ought to be tested, but it is likely that EU laws prohibit testing, in the name of 'free trade'.

But the guidance doesn't stop there. Notwithstanding the simplicity of managing dung and slurry, they recommend the spraying of insecticides and they recommend bringing cattle indoors between dawn and dusk, even though they admit that most dangerous midges come from dung and slurry. These recommendations are presumably for the lazy farmer, not bothered to properly manage their dung and slurry. Could this, like the government's partnership with big pharma vaccine companies, intend to provide chemical business funders with extra customers? Could it be that government don't always work for us? With this in mind. We ought to research the "vicious vaccines" government are attempting to mandate for human consumption.

Is it time that the biotech firms and the bureaucrat partners who force consumption of their products left farmers to do what they do best? To farm?! At this point is could be appropriate to quote Ayn Rand when she stated in Atlas Shrugged that, amongst other things, "you may know that your society is doomed ,, when you see that in order to produce, you need to obtain permission from men who produce nothing"



Transcript of the original Scottish Farmer article:

Cattle are suffering adverse reactions to the compulsory bluetongue 8 vaccine now being administered around Scotland - but farmers are too afraid of being 'victimised' by the authorities to speak up about it.

This was the extraordinary claim of one Ayrshire beef cattle breeder, who told the Scottish Farmer this week that her entire herd of 158 Pedigree cattle had show a severe loss of condition since their second dose.

The breeder, who supplied her name but wished to remain anonymous, claimed that the vaccine manufacturer had since offered to pay for further veterinary testing of her herd to pay for further veterinary testing of her herd to determine the cause - but she was adamant that the vaccine was the sole root of her problems.

"The cattle were as fat as ever and thriving till they got their second dose, then the weight just fell off them. I'd estimate that the majority have lost between two and three hundredweight each. The calves were the least affected, but my best bull actually died.

"All the animals are eating as well as ever, and I've changed nothing in the feed - its just like the vaccine has done something to stop their guts working properly."

What clinched it for her was that one beast, destined for an early sale, was not vaccinated, and is now, she claimed, the only one in the herd gaining weight.

The breeder insisted that she was not alone* in her experience of the vaccine, but said there was a "climate of fear" preventing affected farmers from speaking up: "climate of fear" preventing affected farmers from speaking up: "The feeling is, if you complain, your farm will be crawling with inspectors until they can find something to blame other than the vaccine." (*Note, original article had a typo, alone was spelt along)

However, the official line on the vaccine's excellent safety record remains unshaken, and was reinforced further by the results of a Europe-wide survey by the European Medicines Agency that found the frequency of adverse drug reactions to the bluetongue vaccine had been very low indeed, less than 1 in every 10,000 stock treated.

Privately, industry insiders concede that scare stories about the vaccine's side-effects are an inevitable consequence of making its use compulsory, as some farmers will always rail against being told what to do, and find proof to support their defiance.

By contrast, in England, where vaccination is not compulsory, there is now a concerted campaign underway to convince livestock keepers to act for the common good.

Charles Harding. Midlands sheep breeder and the 2008 president of the Suffolk Sheep Society, has stood up to be counted as one farmer embracing voluntary vaccination.

"We've got friends who are sheep breeders in Holland and Belgium whose flocks suffered with the disease in 2007 and the consequences are terrifying," said Mr Harding.

"We vaccinated all our stock in mid May last year, as soon as Leicestershire came into the protection zone. The fact that bluetongue did not spread last year is proof to me that the vaccination worked. I would recommend that every British livestock farmer vaccinates until we can be confident that bluetongue has been kept at bay."

Mr Harding believes that it would be short-sighted not to vaccinate against this time round, given the experiences in other parts of northern Europe. "For me, vaccination is a no-brainer - knowing the damage bluetongue can do, it is simply not worth risking the health of the flock and the business."

NFU Scotland this week welcomed confirmation that Scottish farmers had shunned imports of cattle and sheep from Europe in a bid to keep Scotland free of bluetongue.

The Scottish Government has confirmed that in January and February of 2009, there was no compulsory bluetongue tests carried out as no susceptible animals were imported directly to Scotland. By way of a comparison, 67 animals were imported into Scotland and required post-movement testing for bluetongue in the first quarter of 2008.

NFU Scotland president, Jim McLaren, said: "As producers, we are holding up our end of the deal. Imports of cattle and sheep from Europe, where the disease has been running rife, have been identified as presenting the greatest risk to our disease-free status. The news that, on the first few months of 2009, there have been no imports into Scotland from the disease hotspots in Europe shows that the messages for Scottish farmers to act responsibly are being heeded."




---------------------------------------------

"I swear upon the altar of God, eternal hostility to every form of tyranny over the mind of man."  Thomas Jefferson




Windows Live: Keep your friends up to date with what you do online.

People in this
Meetup are also in:

Sign up

Meetup members, Log in

By clicking "Sign up" or "Sign up using Facebook", you confirm that you accept our Terms of Service & Privacy Policy