The Miami Critical Mass Meetup Group Message Board › City of Coral Gables Bike Lane Outrage

City of Coral Gables Bike Lane Outrage

Kurt
cudak888
Miami, FL
Post #: 74
The photos:

Intersection, as seen from the north, looking south:


Bike lane merges to sidewalk w/no alternate route:


Bike lane begins from sidewalk, length under 7 feet. Merges immidiately into traffic within a T-shaped intersection, putting cyclists at risk of being hit from the side and from behind simultaneously:


Bike lane travels behind angled parking spaces. In the background (and currently broken up from the construction), the bike lane once edged right, so it would specifically butt up against two parallel parking spaces - creating a classic door-zone situation:


Again, bike lane begins from sidewalk, and travels directly into the door zone. The entrance angle of the bike lane also prevents motorists from viewing oncoming bicycles from their left mirror, increasing chances of door-zone incidents:


"Bikes 'Yield to Peds'" - conclusive evidence that northbound cycle lane is supposed to merge onto the sidewalk, rather then VC through the roundabout (not that I have a problem with cyclists yielding to pedestrians, if someone wishes to ride on the sidewalk):


The beginning of the intersection, viewed from the south, looking north. Note substandard width of lane that allows cyclists to use lane with VC privileges, as per Florida 316.2065:



The intersection:




The people to contact:
cityofcoralgables@coralgables.com - tell them that these bike lanes must be re-striped to indicate that cyclists may continue past the sidewalk exit. Likewise, VC signage at and around the roundabout would be ideal. Better yet, tell them that you want to see the door zone issues eliminated properly.

Keep in mind, this is only the City's first roundabout with sidewalk-inclined bike lanes. The construction visible in the background of photos #4 and #5 is the beginning of another. Let us collectively see to it that the City does not integrate the same mistakes again.

Stop the insanity and the injustice towards cyclists. Remember, if someone becomes involved in a VC-related collision in this intersection, that cyclist is most likely to be (incorrectly) blamed for riding outside the bike lane, even though treating this intersection as a sharrow is allowed under Florida Statute 316.2065. Additionally, this type of sinage encourages motorists to disrespect our right to cycle through this intersection as granted by said statute. Roadways should always be striped to represent the laws that apply to them - otherwise, such incidents will occur.

Your emails to the City will prevent this, and can help to positively influence the Gables towards pro-cycling measures.

Groups and additional discussion:

Flickr group: http://www.flickr.com/groups/coralgablesbikelanes/­
More discussion: Bikeforums.net: Coral Gables Bike Lane Outrage

-Kurt
Camilo P.
user 10444354
Miami, FL
Post #: 6
I have to admit, I have no idea how bike lanes would work at a roundabout. Have you got any examples of working roundabout bike lanes? I get the feeling that a lot of these horrid mistakes are likely the result of confusion as to how bike lanes should work around there. At least that's the vibe I get by eyeballing these.
A former member
Post #: 18
There are elements of poor design in all these pictures. Some, evidently, being worse than others. The sad thing is that it may not even be the City of Coral Gables but Dade County who put the lanes in. I have no idea... But when I look at the set of bike lanes in my neighborhood, in Kendale Lakes, I can see the inconsistencies all over in bike lanes that were designed by one single entity: Dade County.

The lanes I use are located along SW 142nd Ave, SW 84 St, Sunset Drive and the Kendale Lakes Country Club. These lanes all seem to have been designed by 10 different entities with no consistency in design and lots of errors. I find most errors deal with the start/end of the lanes and how they merge into traffic once they've run their course. It's almost as if the designers can't make up their minds about directing the cyclists to the road, the sidewalk or just nowhere as it's usually the case.

The start/end of the lanes, being where the most emphasis must be placed to create awareness of our presence on the road. Clearly, the county needs to get it together in the oversight of public works. It's almost as if they just leave it for the contractors to do the work as it occurs to them, without following any standards.
Muffdoc
user 8666313
Miami, FL
Post #: 22
At the Round-about on Ponce, just before US-1, I Jump in as a Car would. But you have to love the City Beautiful.
Kurt
cudak888
Miami, FL
Post #: 75
I have to admit, I have no idea how bike lanes would work at a roundabout.

They don't. Sharrows are the only answer; after all, cyclists are already granted the right to treat that intersection vehicularly by 316.2065.

The issue at this point is proper signage to reduce motorist altercations and potential accidents.

-Kurt
Kurt
cudak888
Miami, FL
Post #: 76
There are elements of poor design in all these pictures. Some, evidently, being worse than others. The sad thing is that it may not even be the City of Coral Gables but Dade County who put the lanes in.

All the more reason to call the city and find out who is responsible for the roundabout construction.

-Kurt
Collin
emperor_tomato
Group Organizer
Miami, FL
Post #: 164
This is a great post. Bike lanes are supposed to end before a round-about. I believe the rider should stay on road and go around the circle as they are a vehicle and should act like one.
County public works has this fascination with having cyclists leave the roadway, go on to a sidewalk that is never wide enough to be shared with pedestrians, and then the cyclists is supposed to get off their bike and act as a pedestrian. Then get on the other side of the road and back onto a bike lane.
I argue constantly about this, and think it's just foolish.
I just say either end the bike lane 100' before the circle as is the new standard, and begin it again on the other side. Remember, you don't have to use the sidewalk, and I would just merge into traffic and go around the circle.
A former member
Post #: 20
This is a great post. Bike lanes are supposed to end before a round-about. I believe the rider should stay on road and go around the circle as they are a vehicle and should act like one.
County public works has this fascination with having cyclists leave the roadway, go on to a sidewalk that is never wide enough to be shared with pedestrians, and then the cyclists is supposed to get off their bike and act as a pedestrian. Then get on the other side of the road and back onto a bike lane.
I argue constantly about this, and think it's just foolish.
I just say either end the bike lane 100' before the circle as is the new standard, and begin it again on the other side. Remember, you don't have to use the sidewalk, and I would just merge into traffic and go around the circle.

Exactly how it should be, accompanied with a plastering of signage, sharrows, etc.
Muffdoc
user 8666313
Miami, FL
Post #: 23
While we are at it, I would love it if they added a bikeway along sw 16th St. Other than making the street a tad wider, a way to cross the 826 would be hefty side of the capital expense. I know there's a catwalk over the 826 by 32nd St, but using 16th is such straight shot though the county. I'm only asking for usable bike routes in and out of the city. I'm lucky I've figured out a sheltered route.
Kurt
cudak888
Miami, FL
Post #: 77
County public works has this fascination with having cyclists leave the roadway, go on to a sidewalk that is never wide enough to be shared with pedestrians, and then the cyclists is supposed to get off their bike and act as a pedestrian.

Collin, I detect from your tone of voice that the County sticks their foot in the City of Miami's traffic construction, correct?

Does the County bother to read (or care) about what the Federal Highway Administration's MUTCD states? There's a paragraph in it that correlates your position nearly word for word:

"Standard:
12 Bicycle lanes shall not be provided on the circular roadway of a roundabout.
Guidance:
13 Bicycle lane markings should stop at least 100 feet before the crosswalk, or if no crosswalk is provided, at
least 100 feet before the yield line, or if no yield line is provided, then at least 100 feet before the edge of the
circulatory roadway.
"

Pretty hard to argue with FHWA, though knowing the County, they probably would.

-Kurt
Powered by mvnForum

Our Sponsors

  • Emerge Miami

    Hosting Bike Rides and connecting Advocates to bike issues.

People in this
Meetup are also in:

Sign up

Meetup members, Log in

By clicking "Sign up" or "Sign up using Facebook", you confirm that you accept our Terms of Service & Privacy Policy