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Washington Math Meetup Group Message Board › Math books to read?

Math books to read?

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A former member
Post #: 1
Hey all!
At this last Meetup we discussed some books that might be fun to read as a group. If you remember the ones you mentioned or have other suggestions, could you post them here?
Daphne, I forgot to ask -- does Reiter's ever carries the yellow math books published by Springer? There's a couple of books in their Undergraduate Texts in Mathematics series that I would like to work through some day:
* I've never taken a proper Real Analysis class, and Stephen Abbott's "Understanding Analysis" seems like a really good introduction.
* John Stillwell's "Mathematics and its History" does a good job of showing the history of, and connections among, all the major branches of math. I've skimmed the whole thing but now I'd like to go back and work all the exercises -- anyone else interested?
Cheers!
Jerzy
James H.
user 8251761
Falls Church, VA
Post #: 1
Hey all!
At this last Meetup we discussed some books that might be fun to read as a group. If you remember the ones you mentioned or have other suggestions, could you post them here?
Daphne, I forgot to ask -- does Reiter's ever carries the yellow math books published by Springer? There's a couple of books in their Undergraduate Texts in Mathematics series that I would like to work through some day:
* I've never taken a proper Real Analysis class, and Stephen Abbott's "Understanding Analysis" seems like a really good introduction.
* John Stillwell's "Mathematics and its History" does a good job of showing the history of, and connections among, all the major branches of math. I've skimmed the whole thing but now I'd like to go back and work all the exercises -- anyone else interested?
Cheers!
Jerzy

Here are some of the books I remember as well as two books I said I would look for:

Adventures of a Mathematician by Stanislaw M. Ulam
SICP -- Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs by Harold Abelson and Gerald Jay Sussman with Julie Sussman
The Art of Computer Programming by Donald Knuth
NIST Handbook of Mathematical Functions Edited by Olver, Lozier, Boisvert, and Clark
Atlas For Computing Mathematical Functions
Elements of Programming by Alexander Stepanov
Algebra: An Elementary Text-Book ( Two Volume Set ) by G Chrystol

Thank you for asking the question. That last book above is not as elementary as the title may lead you to believe.

A former member
Post #: 1
Thanks, Jerzy!

Here are some books I have read that are excellent:

The Equation That Couldn't Be Solved: How Mathematical Genius Discovered the Language of Symmetry (Mario Livio)
- If you've ever wanted to make a concrete connection between symmetry, group theory, and radical solutions to polynomial equations, this book will do it in an understandable way. This book does a good job of describing the lives of Abel and Galois.

Symmetry: A Journey into the Patterns of Nature (Marcus Du Sautoy)
- If you're interested in learning more about symmetry and how it manifests itself in art and in nature (especially quantum mechanics and other high-level areas), then this is something you need to read. Algebraists would find this very motivating.

The Golden Ratio (Mario Livio)
- Lucid prose describing the occurrence of the golden ratio in nature; how are the logarithmic spiral, the breeding habits of rabbits, how children climb stairs, and the arrangement of petals on a rose all related? The Golden Ratio describes all of these phenomena and the underlying commonality between them. A fantastic read...

Is God a Mathematician (Mario Livio)
- Mathematics seems too perfect a tool for describing the universe and the strange phenomena that take place within it. Livio asks if the creator of the universe is in fact a mathematician. The book i

The Man Who Knew Infinity: A Life of the Genius Ramanujan (Robert Kanigel)
- Biography...duh. Ramanujan was a giant of mathematics; his contributions are staggering. Kanigel exposes his life as a boy in India and his eventual work with G. H. Hardy both with a good eye for detail.

That's all for now...I'm too lazy to put down more books here, but I've read a bunch more that are really very interesting. If you've got some that you think are good, post them here, please!

Umar
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