addressalign-toparrow-leftarrow-rightbackbellblockcalendarcameraccwchatcheckchevron-downchevron-leftchevron-rightchevron-small-downchevron-small-leftchevron-small-rightchevron-small-upchevron-upcircle-with-checkcircle-with-crosscircle-with-pluscrossdots-three-verticaleditemptyheartexporteye-with-lineeyefacebookfolderfullheartglobegmailgoogleimageimagesinstagramlinklocation-pinmagnifying-glassmailminusmoremuplabelShape 3 + Rectangle 1outlookpersonplusprice-ribbonImported LayersImported LayersImported Layersshieldstartickettrashtriangle-downtriangle-uptwitteruseryahoo

Draft and Dogma Message Board › What are your irrational beliefs?

What are your irrational beliefs?

Logan
loganmk
Group Organizer
Boston, MA
Post #: 4
At our next meet up we will use the topic of irrational beliefs to spring board into a conversation about the nature of faith. So let me ask the group: What are your irrational beliefs? Does your lucky shirt help the Celtics win? Is it bad luck to open an umbrella indoors? Let us know below and we might use your idea to get the conversation started next time.
Logan
loganmk
Group Organizer
Boston, MA
Post #: 5
Saw this article and it seems to apply to our next topic. http://thegospelcoali...­

Thoughts?
Allison C.
user 81765432
Jamaica Plain, MA
Post #: 1
Well, I Used to have a lot of irrational beliefs, the most notable is from my youth. I don't know how I got it into my head or who convinced me, as I am quite gullible, that steak was horse meat. For the longest time I just though that's what it was. Burgers was cow, bacon and ham and sausage was pig and steak was horse. I really don't know! ^_^
Allison C.
user 81765432
Jamaica Plain, MA
Post #: 2
About the article, I think it's spot on in some cases. Being a young Christian I get a lot of heat from my non-Christian friends about being no fun anymore or a totally different person. They would be right I'm not the party animal I used to be and that means, "I can't relate to them or hang with them anymore." Which is simply not true. For the most part a lot of atheists are God/Religion haters, I know this because I was one for nine years. The other atheists admit that they just don't believe in anything or care to believe/are not compelled to believe. The former are the group who do the loudest nay saying of religious organizations and people and are the ones most likely to start a fight with you. The Latter are much nicer people. In a lot of cases I've found that both parties have been hurt or misinformed about God, Jesus, the church, Religion in the past and have formed opinions and objections likewise. I was an Angry atheist for a long time.

However being an atheist and Being a Christian have their stigmas (some I touched on in the above paragraph) as does any cultural group you could identify with. Not all Christians are old dudes, a vast majority are actually young adults. Same for atheists, not all of them are prescribed "God Haters" some just grew up without religious affiliations of any kind.

These were my initial thoughts. What do you guys think?
Saurya V.
saurya
Hyderabad, IN
Post #: 1
Youth culture as it stands is deeply concerned with hedonism - I'm an atheist and I've gotten a similar reaction (can't relate, can't hang out) from a lot of my friends of various faiths, mostly because I'm into reading books or writing programs on the weekend rather than getting slizzered.

I have one slight amendment to make to your statement: "For the most part a lot of internet atheists are God/Religion haters" I work with a lot of atheists - about 2/3 of my team, and frequently go to atheist meetups. My (other atheist) friends who don't go to the meetups often ask me how the "church-burning neckbeards" are doing - simply based on their preconception of groups of atheists. Atheists definitely have a pretty poor reputation in the US. Though, honestly you should take that study with a healthy grain of salt - those confidence intervals are pretty wide.

As for atheists being misinformed about God or not caring, surveys don't seem to bear that out. A lot of us grew up without religious affiliations, but we grew curious and we researched it anyway (me and my sister, for example). Still, I think I've run into more folks who've grown up with religious affiliations and left those in adulthood. Anecdotal evidence, for now, since I haven't really researched this topic.

I'd love to continue this talk in person!

As for the article, I'd love to see the context of the quote. Otherwise, I get to say "Justin Taylor of The Gospel Coalition thinks unbelievers have a funky social life!" This is the very problem of metaphors: they'll rarely be similar enough to the situation being described to be bulletproof. They are merely talking points, a message to stick in the mind and aid understanding. This metaphor sounds a lot more like the argument in Atheism+ circles that atheism ISN'T a faith in and of itself since it implies no sense of moral understanding and hence humanism must follow an atheistic understanding of the universe.
Saurya V.
saurya
Hyderabad, IN
Post #: 2
The source article contains some choice statements:



"It is an odd target and an odder market. Modern Britain throbs with questionable faiths, objectively unproven but powerfully influencing personal behaviour and state policy. A brief list would include man-made global warming, the worthiness of liberal intervention in foreign countries, the existence of dyslexia, ADHD and addiction and the serotonin theory of depression. Honest scepticism about any of these is not welcome in mainstream publishing."


Oh boy, for one - yes skepticism IS welcome in mainstream publishing. Especially when it comes to the serotonin theory of depression - Google it and see how many articles scream about it. Or climate change questioning, for that matter - which occurs despite a great collection of correlation data and an understood causation.



"Religion, he says, is ‘exactly the same kind of thing as astrology’; religious believers are repeatedly equated with those who believe in fairies, goblins and dragons."


If he's implying that religious believers are inherently superior in some way, I'm sure Icelanders would be very unhappy with him.



"I urge him to study the works of his fellow atheist Thomas Nagel, Professor of Philosophy and Law at New York University, who writes eloquently of what he calls ‘the fear of religion itself’, saying he is strongly subject to such a fear and confessing that he wants atheism to be true and is made uneasy by the fact that some of the most intelligent and well-informed people he knows are religious believers."


Turns out, professors are people too and just as likely to fall prey to logical fallacies.



"It is my suspicion that Christians and atheists share one very strong emotion — the fear that God exists. The difference is that Christians also want Him to exist. The truly interesting question, unexplored in this book, is why each side wants what it wants."


From one statement of one writer, he projects a "very strong emotion" onto a group of people across the earth who don't share a language, a common text or culture.
Allison C.
user 81765432
Jamaica Plain, MA
Post #: 3
Yes thank you for amending that statement, it's always dicey to make generalizations so I'm glad someone disagreed with me! I would also like to talk more about it with you as I admit I'm not as knowledgeable on the topic. I can admit when I may be wrong and also that I have some pretty strong biases due to life experience but I'm always willing to see things differently and change my ideas when necessary. Thanks for the insight ^_^

I do agree thats youth culture is overly concerned with hedonism but I think we may differ in opinion on just why that is. It's clear the driving force in music and entertainment is the promotion of immorality (devoid of religions affiliations or lack there of). We are so over exposed to sex, drugs and rock and roll that it has become no big thing to us. As Britney Spears so affluently put it in her song 3, "Are you in living in sin is the new thing". People don't have to be Christians to understand that the behaviors being portrayed as acceptable are sinful in nature.

It's interesting to me to understand Atheists from a psychological stand point because they share a lot of similarities in thought and cognition as Religious people do, as you pointed out in your comment above, "It is my suspicion that Christians and atheists share one very strong emotion — the fear that God exists. The difference is that Christians also want Him to exist. The truly interesting question, unexplored in this book, is why each side wants what it wants." I too ponder the answer to this question often times considering personal experience and upbringing as evidence. Thoughts?
Powered by mvnForum

Our Sponsors

Sign up

Meetup members, Log in

By clicking "Sign up" or "Sign up using Facebook", you confirm that you accept our Terms of Service & Privacy Policy